1. #1
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    Default Rounding out the tool box...

    Looking towards next year's budgets, the Chief is asking for suggestions on equipment.

    We have very good hydraulic tool capabilities, a decent amount of dunnage, air bags, and plenty of all the normal handtools. But we could use some more tools to round out our tool box for the more unusual stuff we run into.

    My first three thoughts are:
    -- Stabilizer struts, for rolled over cars
    -- "Wizzer" pneumatic cut-off tool for removing pedals
    -- Cordless Reciprocating saw.

    a) Anything else people can think of? Neat toys, etc?
    b) Any recommendations, or as I know the commercial guys here can't "advertise" just any links to know who is out there for struts?

    Yes, I'm being lazy and not searching the archives
    Matt

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    We are looking into an exothermic torch for our new rescue. A neighboring department has one and recommended that we get one as well. Can do the job of that "Whizzer" as well as some other neat tricks.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    Default Re: Rounding out the tool box...

    Originally posted by Dalmatian90
    "Wizzer" pneumatic cut-off tool
    Does anyone have any idea where to find information on these?

    I've thrown dozens of key words at Google with no luck... and I've never seen or used one.

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    AFAIK, "Wizzer" is just a generic name for a air-powered Cut Off Tool:



    Since the body is about the size of a fist, it seems like it would be easy to get into tight quarters for pedal jobs. We had a tough one last year where we couldn't get tools in on the pedal, and the front of the work van was completely mashed in (the driver of the other vehicle was DOA), and best us and the other department could do was get a chain around it and use four firefighters and pry-bar pulling on the chain to move the pedal. I remember sizing that situation up and just wishing we had one of these -- I had plenty of room to get in and hook the chain, I would've had plenty of room for a wizzer.

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    Dal,

    Here is some info for you on struts:

    Paratech (www.paratech-inc.com) and Airshore (www.airshore.com) both make heavy duty structural support struts which are more than adequate for vehicle stabilization, but are REALLY expensive, REALLY big, and are pretty tough to use on vehicles. Airshore also makes a smaller set of struts for vehicles called "ART Lite". These used to belong to Hurst and were sold as the "Warthog". Hurst dropped them due to poor sales and customer complaints. I haven't found anyone who owns a set of the ART Lite yet, so I don't know if they are any better than the Wartgogs were.

    There are several of us making struts specifically for NFPA 1670, Chapter 6 types of rescues (Vehicle and Machinery). They are:
    Rescue 42 TeleCribbing (That's my company...)- www.rescue42.com
    Rescue Logic VSU's - www.rescuelogic.com
    Alpha Reacue "The Crutch" - www.alpharescue.com
    Cepco Tools "Res-Q-Jack" - www.cepcotool.com
    Junkyard Dog "Nightmare" Struts - www.glickfire.com/Rescue/struts.htm

    Another flavor of these are the "Cut Wood" struts made by cutting 4X4's at the scene and putting special fittings on one or both ends:
    Z-Mag Rescue "groundpads" - www.zmagrescue.com
    Howell "Capabear Claw" - www.howellrescue.com/capabear_claw_hd_kit.htm

    Which is best for you? You'll have to decide. I, of course, am biased...

    Tim
    www.rescue42.com

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    hey dal, you say cordless sawzall, to you have a corded one already??
    We have an ancient one that will probably survive a nuclear winter. But that's another cord...and we've never had "extrication" blades for it. Many a partition fire has been exposed by it over the years though.

    plus if you need to cut up timbers for odd-job shoring, it's allot more user friendly then breaking out the chainsaw.
    Also carry an ancient Skilsaw...never mind shoring, I've used it to cut off the contaminated ends of dunnage to red bag it at scenes...shivers....

    what's your air power for the "wizzer" do you have a work-compressor, or will you be running it off SCBA bottles?

    I can't imagine it takes that much air.

    We still carry 4 low pressure SCBA bottles to run tools, plus we can tap the air brake systems on our ET and Ladder, and I have the parts in my truck to put the tap on our Service truck's CAFS system to tap into it's 40cfm @ 100psi compressor -- so air shouldn't be a problem. Maybe a double female would be good for our Rescue truck to tap into it's airbrakes, too (it already has a male fitting for the air shoreline in the station).

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    Originally posted by Rescue 42 (edited)


    Which is best for you? You'll have to decide. I, of course, am biased...

    Tim
    Tim you are to be complimented on the informative and un-biased nature of your post! I got to agree with YOU! Get your hands on these valuable assets to your cadre, check out the specs, play (oops, Evaluate) with them, Try before you buy! Again I do not care which one you get, but you really need this option in your arsenal. I will also pass along that the ZMAG RESCUE Tools Site is currently under construction but ZMAG (Mike Schmidt) can still be reached at Zmagrescue@aol.com
    Last edited by Carl Avery; 12-05-2002 at 10:31 AM.
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

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    I'm not a big fan of MAC tools,but they have a cutoff saw that you can angle the cutting head 45 degrees to the Air motor.Quite handy for those really tight spots.Rescue 42 we won't hold your bias against you,I've got my opinions too. Hehe T.C.

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    one of the things i've enjoyed the most lately has been those combo kits that they sell at lowe's or home deport or what not that has the battery operated drills, recip saws, buzz saws, flashlights in the same box. it's a great thing and it usually doesn't take up all the much room.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
    IACOJ Attack

    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

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    Dal.. good ideas

    We use paratech and zmag struts. Once you start using these things you will find so many more uses for them. Your use for normal box cribs will really decrease. Get something flexible and expandable. Try anything you want to buy. Some of these that are out there look pretty crude and cheesy.. not sure how much testing if any they received. We are very happy with both the Paratech and Zmag stuff.

    The Milwaukee Super Sawzall (11 amp motor) has worked really well for us and is light years different from our old sawzall. The Milwaukee 18V cordless sucks (In my opinion). We bought it right after it hit the market so it may be tweaked, but it is weak, the keyless chuck is completely unreliable and the batteries don't last long. The 24V Dewalts are really nice, we got the AC cord adapter also for those. Their keyless chuck is much better.

    I'm not sure I'd use our whizzer saws on pedals. I have cut some stuff with them and they are small and maneuverable, but take a while for anything of any size. I like the hurst pedal cutter for hardened steel. Im sure there are other similar brands. The whizzers are cheap and serve a purpose, so buying them will help in other areas.

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    HEY! I'm back! It seems as though when this board did a few modifications I somehow fell in a black hole and couldn't get out. Some silly thing like my screen name not haveing enough letters and some other cyber mystery. Anyway, I have been watching the postings just couldn't get on to comment.

    First ... Tim, fine job. That was an excellent and informative posting on struts.Maybe we have finally broken the trend that was forming on here of the "My tools better then your tool" ugly stuff. Many of you know that one of my pet peeves is using an educational and information forum as a free sales tool. I only have one correction to add to your posting. Most users of my "Ground Pads" carry 3 foot and 5 foot lenghts of 4x4's, No "Field cutting" as you mentioned. This selection will work well over 90% of the time.

    Second ... Thanks to Carl for filling in for me while I was battleing the cyber demons that had me locked out. And as he mentioned I am useing this slow time of year (got really white outside today) to work on my new and exciting website. My webchick tells me that we need a "critique" team to pick it apart and make comment, so I will be asking a few of you to do that for me. Stay warm, and lets keep learning.

    Zmag

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    Drkblram,

    Sorry to confuse you. I see that I was not clear enough in my post.

    I think Paratech and Airshore heavy rescue struts are outstanding tools! If you are already carrying these struts, there is probably not a need for NFPA 1670, Ch. 6 type struts. Paratech does not have dedicated "vehicle" struts, but uses their smaller(?) structural struts as vehicle stabilizers. As you agreed, they take up a lot of room and are very expensive. Because their primary purpose in life is to hold up heavy buildings, they also lack a lot of the versatility, flexibility, and ease of use we are able to incorporate into our lighter duty vehicle and machinery rescue kits. Our "Long" Strut telescopes from 3 feet to 8 1/2 feet in about 5 seconds. Doing that with a Paratech or Airshore would require carrying and getting out extensions, plugging them in, etc. The amount of storage required to do that is large and it takes a lot of time to put them all together. Same goes for the Airshore line with the exception of the ART Lite system which IS made for vehicle rescue, and about which I have not heard good things.

    If you have lots of room on your rig, have a big budget, and need to carry heavy structural support struts, then the Paratech and Airshore heavy rescue struts are the way to go. I'm jealous! I'd like to carry them, too.

    I make tools for the rest of us...

    Tim

    www.rescue42.com

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    Dalmatian
    You probably already know, and depending on the situation you can pull the pedals sideways and they break very easy. They are made to be strong vertically (pressure up and down), but are very week when pulled to the side.

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    Thumbs up

    I will go with Halligan84 on this one, the 24V Dewalts are really nice with the AC cord adapter and a demolition blade, that is a good option. That is what we are looking into adding to our arsenal.

    We are one of the Resq Co's on our area with struts (Para-tech) and they are very nice. Definetly a nice addition to complement a Rescue.

    As for another tool to look into for this year's budget, 2KW Honda Portable Generator with 500W attachable light. Again another tool we are looking into. I have found pricing for this around $1500. Can light up and work area and with 1500W left over, surely run a reciprocating saw and another electrical tool with ease.
    Keep Safe!

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    I hate to sound stupid and I guess I was just a bit lazzy as I did not scan all the way back threw all the posts. But DID any Body say adding a Tool Box to your Tool Box?? OK I know some of you are scratching your heads, while others of you are thinking He is as crazy as I thought he was! But here is what I am getting at! A good assortment of Hand tools with various wrenches, Screw Drivers and other assorted tools can get you out of a real mess some times. Dwight Clark refers to Pushing, Pulling and Cutting as the three basic operations we deal with. But for those of you that have training in agricultural Rescue (ie: FarMedic) YOU know that we have yet another option. That option is Disassemble! Every once in a while you will find a Rescue Challenge where a good set of Craftsmen, Husky, Snap-on, (your favorite Brand here), etcetera etcetera will enable you to achieve the Rescue like No "Jaws" or Saws ever could ! Just some more food for thought!
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

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    I agree with Carl. We have a 160 pc. Socket set along with some box end wrenches and a pneumatic socket driver on our rescue. In the case of Industrial rescue sometimes its easier and safer to disassemble than it is to pry, cut or spread. For air we use the air lines provided on the truck and have a couple spare 2216 air bottles if the air lines wont reach.
    Shawn M. Cecula
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    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

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    That option is Disassemble! Every once in a while you will find a Rescue Challenge where a good set of Craftsmen, Husky, Snap-on, (your favorite Brand here), etcetera etcetera will enable you to achieve the Rescue like No "Jaws" or Saws ever could ! Just some more food for thought!

    Yeah...but if you're anything like my company, before using those tools you'd have to go,

    "QV Dispatch from Rescue 490."
    "QV's on Rescue 490."
    "Could you blow our Knox Box tones to unlock the tool box?"
    "Roger."



    Screwdrivers, wrenches, and sockets seem to have a short life around the station. Not that someone deliberately takes them, but people work on something, and put tools back in the wrong truck, or personal and company tools get mingled and all put back in a personal toolbox.

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    Dal,
    You can mark them, ( I am sure that you already thought of this) engrave or use a paint marker. Mark for each truck differently that way the tools can be differentiated. And hopefully the people that are allowing the FD tools to mingle with their personal tools will realize and put them back where they belong.
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

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    Originally posted by Dalmatian90 (edited)
    [i]

    Yeah...but if you're anything like my company, before using those tools you'd have to go,

    "QV Dispatch from Rescue 490."
    "QV's on Rescue 490."
    "Could you blow our Knox Box tones to unlock the tool box?"
    "Roger."



    Screwdrivers, wrenches, and sockets seem to have a short life around the station. Not that someone deliberately takes them, but people work on something, and put tools back in the wrong truck, or personal and company tools get mingled and all put back in a personal toolbox.
    Hey your crew ain't a whole lot different than ours or any other one that I know of. But I would say this; We are so willing to spend money at the Drop of a hate sometimes! BUT when you consider the cost of a simple set of tool, Periodic replacement should be considered no more than maintence cost. I know this sticks in our craw but I honestly do not know how to STOP IT, Engraving and Color coding does help slow the process. But lets not through the baby out with the bath water here! If that is what we need then that is what we need.
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

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