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  1. #61
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    Default Men identified in snowmobile accident on Big Cedar Lake

    Men identified in snowmobile accident on Big Cedar Lake

    By LAURIA LYNCH-GERMAN

    Jan. 22, 2003

    Town of West Bend - An investigation continued Wednesday into what caused two men to plunge into the frigid waters of Big Cedar Lake while snowmobiling in the early evening Tuesday, killing one of the men.
    Michael J. Mann, 21, of the Town of Trenton, was pulled from the open water about 50 yards northwest of the largest island in Big Cedar Lake just before midnight Tuesday.
    He was taken by Flight for Life to Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital and declared dead at the hospital.
    Craig Davidson, 30, also of Trenton, was rescued about 7:35 p.m. when a teenager on his way to church heard cries for help and dashed to the lake with rope and a flashlight. He met up with two others and using the line, the three pulled Davidson to safety.
    Both Davidson and Mann were riding on a single sled, Washington County Sheriff Jack Theusch said. Reports do not indicate who was driving the snowmobile at the time.
    Theusch said Wednesday that it had not been determined if alcohol was a factor in the accident.
    Members of the Washington County Sheriff's Department and the West Bend Fire Department arrived at the scene, leaving a trail of flares to mark a path on good ice so crews could travel safely. Members of the Waukesha County Dive Rescue Team were called to recover the body.
    About 20 people gathered at the Big Cedar Lake Rehabilitation and Protection District building to await the outcome of the search.
    Torey Bringa, 17, heard cries for help about 7:30 p.m. as he walked out of his home on W. Lake Drive. "I was going to my car to go to church, and I thought I heard something," Bringa said. "It sounded like 'help' or 'call,' but it sounded pretty faint."
    Bringa said he got in the car and closed the door. Then he thought again.
    "I opened the car door and heard it again," Bringa said. "I walked down toward the front of my house, and then I could really hear it. I could hear someone yelling for help."
    Bringa said he ran into his home, grabbed some rope and a flashlight and headed onto the ice, following the cries. As he approached the open water, he met two other people who had heard the same pleas for help - and encountered a man struggling to stay afloat.
    "We threw in the rope, and the three of us pulled him onto the ice," Bringa said. "(The man) told us he had been hanging on to his friend's shoulders before we got there. He said he was pulling him down."
    Bringa, who was home alone at the time, said he didn't think twice about venturing onto the ice.
    "Even if I thought it was a joke, there was no harm in just checking," he said. "I'm glad I took that second chance to listen again."
    Theusch said initial interviews with witnesses indicated people were helping soon after the sled went in the lake. The man who was pulled from the water was very cold and was treated by the West Bend Fire Department at the scene, Theusch said.
    Theusch called Bringa and the two other rescuers heroic.
    "They didn't necessarily know where the bad ice is, and yet they went out there," he said.
    The area on the lake where the snowmobilers went in has been a popular spot for ice fishing most years but has been free of ice for most of this winter.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM


  2. #62
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    Default 45 Minutes - (WOW - good thing it was not an emergency)

    http://www.zwire.com/site/blocks/opinion/opinion.cfm

    Wednesday 22 January, 2003

    Loudoun Times-Mirror

    Middleburg, Va - Sterling Rescue Squad paramedic Chris Simon and Sterling Fire Department firefighter Steve Gingras worked for more than 45 minutes Saturday afternoon to break through the ice at the Algonkian Regional Park boat ramp. They were trying to help Maryland authorities rescue two fishermen trapped in a boat on the ice. Shortly after the Sterling rescue workers broke though the ice, Maryland rescuers reached the fishermen from the other side of the river.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  3. #63
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    Default Crazy night on Houghton Lake

    http://images.trafficmp.com/tmpad/co...expedia16.html

    Crazy night on Houghton Lake

    Houghton Lake Resorter
    By Thomas Reznich

    January 23, 2003
    Houghton, Lake, MI - “I can’t for the life of me understand why anyone would be out there tonight.” That is the first thing Roscommon County Sheriff Fran Staley said when I found him on Long Point Saturday night.
    Scanner traffic had alerted the Resorter that rescue personnel were searching the large stretch of open water that runs along the southern edge of Long Point to the West Shore of Houghton Lake after receiving reports of someone yelling for help and another of witnesses who thought they saw snowmobile lights disappear into the hole.
    A trip around the lake revealed what struck me as an almost surrealistic scene with groups of snowmobiles going by, some at high rates of speed, rescue equipment, including two Argos and a hovercraft stuck out on the ice, a Coast Guard helicopter and the Sheriff Department airboat conducting searches, all under a full moon.
    Then as I looked out across to the emergency lights on Long Point, fireworks, big ones, began to go off from somewhere just behind the road end the rescue workers were parked at.

    Thankfully, the reports of snowmobilers in the open water turned out to be unfounded, as did an impromptu fire alarm on the West Shore, and all of the rescue workers made it off the ice in good condition. Unfortunately, the film I shot during these goings on did not survive the full moon.

    By all current predictions, the open water that spurred concern last Saturday will still be there for the second weekend of Tip-up Town 2003. Local officials and rescue personnel are praying that caution will keep tragedy at bay once again.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  4. #64
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    Default Snowmobiler dies in Washington County lake

    http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/3606529.html

    Snowmobiler dies in Washington County lake

    The Associated Press
    Published Jan. 23, 2003

    TRENTON, Wis. -- A man died in a Washington County lake after he and another man rode a snowmobile into a patch of open water.
    The sheriff's department received a call around 7:35 p.m. Tuesday that a snowmobile with two people on it had gone through the ice on Big Cedar Lake, Lt. Michael Hetzel said.
    Members of the Waukesha County Dive Rescue Team recovered the body of 21-year-old Michael J. Mann of rural West Bend about four hours later in 30 feet of water, authorities said.
    A teenager on his way to church helped rescue the other man, Craig Davidson, 30, of West Bend, Sheriff Jack Theusch.
    Torey Bringa, 17, said he heard cries for help as he walked out of his house to his car.
    ``It sounded like 'help' or 'call,' but it sounded pretty faint,'' Bringa said. He got in the car but thought again and walked toward the sound.
    Bringa said he ran into his home, grabbed some rope and a flashlight and headed onto the ice, following the cries. As he approached the open water, he met two other people who had heard the same pleas for help. They threw the rope to the man and pulled him up.
    ``(The man) told us he had been hanging on to his friend's shoulders before we got there. He said he was pulling him down,'' Bringa said.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  5. #65
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    Default Woman drowns in Larimer pond

    http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,...3%257E,00.html

    Woman drowns in Larimer pond

    January 24, 2003
    FORT COLLINS, CO - A woman who ventured onto an icy pond after her dog Wednesday drowned in what investigators called "an extremely tragic accident," the Larimer County Sheriff's Office said in a news release.
    Tracy D. Bragg was reported missing at 8:30 p.m. after her dog returned home from a walk without her, the release said. Her husband and a friend searched the area and called the Sheriff's Office when they found footprints leading to the pond at Eagle Ranch Estates in eastern Larimer County.
    The Sheriff's Office sent a dive rescue team to the site, and searchers later recovered her body. Authorities believe she slipped from the ice into open water.
    Bragg had been a co-owner of Needlepoint of View Gallery in Niwot, which closed in March after the owners retired to spend more time with families.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  6. #66
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    Default Fines for ice rescues

    Jan. 22, 2003

    Some want to issue fines for ice rescues

    Greenbay Press Gazette
    By Paul Srubas
    psrubas@greenbaypressgazette.c om

    The prospect of having to pay a hefty fee for their own rescue is unlikely to deter fishermen from going out on dangerous ice, a Green Bay fishing enthusiast says.“I don’t think anybody goes out there saying, ‘I might fall through,’” said Daryl Warren, an ice fisherman and manager of a bait shop. “They don’t go out there thinking, ‘If I fall through, somebody will come get me, but it won’t cost anything.’ They go out thinking the ice is safe or that it’s going to happen to somebody else. They go out thinking, ‘I won’t have a problem.’”
    Rescue crews in Brown County and most other areas of Wisconsin don’t charge for their services. But that could change in Winnebago County, where Sheriff Michael Brooks has asked the Winnebago County Board to establish a rate schedule for charging people who ignore warnings and break through thin ice on local lakes.“
    I don’t believe I as a taxpayer should have to pay for damage and recovery costs when people are out there and they shouldn’t be out there,” Brooks told a Winnebago County Board committee this month.
    He made the request after police and fire departments spent nine hours and damaged two county-owned hovercrafts trying to rescue people stranded on the ice of Lake Winnebago in late December.
    Rescue crews in the Brown County area perform their share of ice rescues on the bay and area lakes and streams, but there is no organized effort to impose a fee on people being rescued.“We don’t impose any charges at all,” said Tom Madigan, director of County Rescue, a nonprofit company that provides ambulance and rescue services under contract with 19 municipalities in Brown County.
    Madigan runs the area’s STAR team — the Specialized Trauma and Rescue team of divers, climbers, pilots and others who perform a variety of emergency rescue operations. And County Rescue’s two helicopters, though intended for emergency medical transport, are frequently called up for search-and-rescue operations.
    Aside from the pilot’s salary and insurance costs, helicopter rescue operations cost an estimated $450 an hour in fuel and depreciation, Madigan said. That means that County Rescue, which helped Winnebago County get the men off Lake Winnebago in that late December operation, cost the company about $1,800, Madigan said.But Madigan and most police and fire departments regard rescue operations as part of the job.
    “The reason we don’t want to impose a charge is, we want people to call,” Madigan said. “Once you impose charges, the next person could hesitate because they’re worried about a bill.”
    But like Winnebago County’s sheriff, many public officials find it frustrating when fishermen and snowmobilers ignore warnings and get into trouble on thin ice, forcing rescuers to endanger themselves.
    “I remember being out on one where we had to slide a ladder after one of our men, so that if he fell in during the rescue, he’d be able to get out,” said Harold Kaye, a former Green Bay firefighter and current chairman of the Brown County Board’s Public Safety Committee. Kaye said no one’s talking locally about imposing a rescue fee, but he’d like to see something done. “I think someone — the (state Department of Natural Resources), the sheriff — should determine whether it’s safe or unsafe, and if it’s unsafe and they go out anyway, there’d be some sort of fine,” he said.However, Kaye said, thanks to liability concerns, no government official likely would ever be willing to declare that ice was safe. In fact, the DNR won’t.
    “Our pat answer is, no ice is safe ice,” said DNR game warden Mike Stahl, Oconto Falls. “There’s no way we know every ice condition on every body of water, and conditions can change daily. … We can’t guarantee it. Nobody can.”The general rule of thumb, Stahl said, is that it should be at least a foot thick before you drive a vehicle on it. “It should be at least 6 inches for an ATV or snowmobile, and 4 inches for it to be walkable,” he said.“Check with local sporting good shops and fisherman” to find out local conditions before venturing out on the ice, he said
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  7. #67
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    Default 2 teens die at Lake Minnetonka, MN

    Jan. 23, 2003

    2 teens who died at Lake Minnetonka identified

    BY AMY MAYRON
    Pioneer Press

    After crashing into open water on Lake Minnetonka in a car, a 17-year-old girl pulled herself out Tuesday night and then walked and crawled a short distance in near-zero temperatures before dying on top of the ice.
    And the body of a 16-year-old boy who was in a car with the girl was found in the water Wednesday after a day of searching for him with cameras and divers at Robinsons Bay in Deephaven.
    The Hennepin County Medical Examiner identified the victims as Jacqueline Hannah Fricke, 17, and Evan Wilson, 16. Both were from Minnetonka. Earlier Wednesday, Hennepin County sheriff's deputies traced the girl's steps from an open area of the water, where tire tracks from the car ended. Authorities believe she died about midnight or before, when it was about 1 degree above zero.
    "It was clear she was in the water; then she walked, collapsed and crawled for 200 yards," said sheriff's Capt. Bill Chandler. "It's very painful to look at the scene."
    The deaths brought the state's ice-related fatalities to 10 so far this winter — double the number for the entire season last year. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and local sheriff's offices repeatedly have warned people in the southern two-thirds of the state to stay off the ice. After last year's abundant precipitation, heavy discharge of warm groundwater into lakes has caused severely dangerous conditions with thin ice and holes as big as several acres.
    The girl's parents called the Hennepin County sheriff's office about 6 a.m. Wednesday to say their daughter hadn't come home Tuesday night and had been driving on the lake with a friend. Sheriff's deputies found her body about 7:30 a.m.
    Both victims are from Minnetonka and were juniors at Minnetonka High School, sheriff's and school officials said.
    The high school released a short statement expressing sympathy to the families and announcing that grief counselors had spent the day at the school and would remain available into the week if students needed them. Officials at the school would not comment further.
    Hennepin County Sheriff's Water Patrol divers searched all Wednesday afternoon for the boy before finding his body at 5:05 p.m., just as deputies were calling off the search for the night. The car, which belonged to the boy, had not been located and it was unclear who was driving when the accident happened.
    Searchers used underwater cameras to try to find the car before diving into the dangerous conditions. Thin ice, frigid temperatures and a water depth of about 32 feet posed obstacles to the divers.
    The water was about 40 degrees and clear, said sheriff's spokeswoman Roseann Campagnoli. But when the divers emerged to temperatures ranging from zero to 4-above, they ran the risk of hypothermia. So the Water Patrol used an airboat to whisk them to a heated boathouse on the shore.
    The Ice Angel, as the boat is called, saw its first major use since it was bought about a year ago.
    The boat can quickly glide across thin ice, keeping rscuers safe on surfaces that crack and break as soon as they step on them.
    Although Lake Minnetonka was open to vehicles Tuesday and Wednesday, the area of Robinsons Bay at the border of Deephaven and Woodland had been marked with orange flags to warn against the open water, which was believed to be about 2 to 4 acres in size. Flags dotted the perimeter about every 50 feet.
    The water had just opened during the weekend and changes in size daily.
    It is not uncommon for vehicles to drive on Lake Minnetonka. But police and water safety experts said they were not aware of it being a popular activity for teenagers.
    Because of the extreme ice conditions this winter, the DNR has been advising people in the southern two-thirds of the state to stay off lakes, said water safety specialist Tim Smalley.
    But many people aren't heeding the warnings.
    "We know lots of people do it," Campagnoli said of people driving on the ice. "Just since we've been standing out here today, one truck drove carelessly close to the open water."
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  8. #68
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    Default Fundraiser to help ice rescue operations

    http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp...7&nav=51s7DZgm

    Fundraising Fisheree to Help With Ice Rescues

    January 25, 2003
    WBAY-Action 2

    Boom Bay, WI - Some Fox Valley volunteer firefighters hope to better their rescue efforts on the ice. The Boom Bay Volunteer Fire Department plans to buy an airboat to service the north end of Lake Poygan.
    Firefighters held a fisheree on Saturday at the Duck Inn Supper Club to raise money for the airboat.
    The fire department is also in the process of buying two ice suits and other gear.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Plane crashes in Delaware River

    http://www.nj.com/news/bridgeton/ind...7304242870.xml

    Plane crash kills two

    Monday, January 27, 2003

    By JOHN BARNA
    Staff Writer

    PEA PATCH ISLAND, Del. -- Two people died after a single engine plane crashed and burned Sunday night on an uninhabited island in the icy Delaware River.
    The plane crashed in snowy weather on Pea Patch Island about 5:40 p.m., said Dave Carpenter Jr., public information officer for the Delaware City Fire Co.
    The Beech Bonanza V-35 craft, en route from Wings field in Ambler, Pa., to Columbia, S.C., burst into flames after it crashed on the 228-acre island
    With the river iced over, emergency crews from the Delaware City Fire Co. used a Delaware State Police helicopter to reach the island. The first crews arrived at 6:20 p.m. and used hand-held extinguishers to battle the flames, Carpenter said.
    Smoke and a fiery glow were visible from Delaware City docks, where emergency crews and reporters gathered. Dozens of residents left their homes nearby to watch the rescue effort.
    The state police helicopter was able to make two runs to the island before snow and high winds made it impossible to be safely operated, Carpenter said.
    Fire boats from the Wilmington, Holiday Terrace and Port Penn fire companies in Delaware were eventually able to make it to the island, a quarter-mile from the Delaware shoreline and about a mile across the river from Finns Point State Park in Pennsville Township.
    It took upwards of two hours to extinguish the fire.
    Firefighters pulled two bodies from the plane.
    The Delaware River surrounding the island is iced over thanks to two weeks of sustained bitter temperatures, according to the U.S. Coast Guard in Philadelphia.
    Winstead said police didn't yet know if weather was a factor in the crash.
    A boat from the Lower Alloways Creek Fire Co. was among those dispatched to the site, according to Salem County emergency communications. Clergy also were transported to the crash site by the Delaware City Fire Co.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  10. #70
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    Default Rescue crews re-enact rescue for TV cameras

    http://www.reformer.com/Stories/0,14...138879,00.html

    Monday, January 27, 2003

    Local crews re-enact rescue for TV cameras

    By DANIEL BARLOW
    Reformer Staff

    NEWFANE, VT -- As emergency workers pulled the pale boy out of the icy waters, a mother's fearful screams were quickly halted by a director yelling, "cut."The once frantic mother quickly became calm after the cameras stopped running. The pale-faced boy, who appeared to be close to death, was only a life-like dummy.Emergency crews from Brattleboro and NewBrook became the stars of a drowning re-enactment Sunday, filmed by a production crew working on a series that will be aired on the Discovery Channel later this year.The story, filmed in a small pond behind WW Building Supply in Newfane, is based on the 1987 drowning death of a young boy in Warwick, R.I.."It was a drowning involving three children," said Capt. Steve Rowell of the Brattleboro Police Department, who was wearing a dry suit in case he needed to jump into the freezing water. "After they fell through some ice, two were brought back and resuscitated, but one boy died."


    The footage will be part of an hour-long show called "Critical Rescue" and will air in six to nine months, according to a member of New Dominion Pictures, the production team behind the show.Crews were at the small pond in Newfane from early Sunday morning and worked into the late afternoon filming and re-filming dramatic scenes of rescue.Fire trucks and ambulances from Grace Cottage Hospital were at the scene sporting the logos for the Warwick fire and ambulance services, as well as Rhode Island license plates. A small crowd gathered near the pond all day, a mix of extras and curious onlookers.The dramatic rescue of one of the young boys from the water was shot a half-dozen times Sunday afternoon as a small crew of divers made their way in and out of the freezing waters.Each time director Greg Francis yelled "action," a young mother in the crowd screamed her son's name over and over again as friends and firefighters held her back from the scene.A dummy of a young boy was used in the water scenes, said a woman on the production team who asked not to be identified. Careful editing and quick cuts will make it look like the dummy is actually the body of a young boy, she said.Most members of the production crew were hesitant to discuss the historic case the re-enactment is based on. One crew member said this drowning was chosen because the grandmother of the dead boy successfully petitioned the state of Rhode Island to pay for ice rescue training and equipment for fire departments and rescue services.The Newfane site was chosen because the production team had previously filmed another show in the area a few years ago, said another crew member.The production team was attracted to the idea of using area rescue officials in the re-enactment because it would appear more realistic and take less time, said one crew member."Working with real firefighters and real emergency personnel makes production easier," she said. "Shooting real people doing their real jobs makes production so much quicker."Brattleboro Fire Chief David Emery said the show's producers asked to use his department's crew and equipment because the NewBrook team didn't have the correct cold-water rescue equipment. His department was happy to volunteer the time to be on television, he said."It was really neat," Emery said. "It's something that doesn't happen to you every day."Emery's son, Chad, was also chosen to play Michael Moan, the Warwick firefighter who arrived alone at the scene and saved the lives of two of the boys. The producers flew Chad to Virginia on Wednesday to record some scenes for the episode.For the fire and rescue crews, working on the show was an opportunity to test out some equipment and brush up on some training."I've been working with these people since 6 a.m. and it's been great to try out some of these exercise in a non-emergency situation," said Rowell. "We always try to keep training for situations such as this and this was our opportunity to do that."
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Firefighters learn ice rescue skills

    http://www.stjoenews-press.com/print...bSectionID=272

    Firefighters learn ice rescue

    January 26, 2003

    By MARSHALL WHITE

    St. Joseph, MO - Participants in exercise will soon teach techniques Passers-by were surprised to see a group of people dressed in red or yellow suits moving around on Corby Pond Saturday.The opportunity to witness an ice rescue was the last thing he expected to see Saturday, said Barry Nouzovsky, a senior at Lafayette High School. “I stopped because it was really neat to see something I’ve watched on television,” Mr. Nouzovsky said.Sixteen firefighters, including six from St. Joseph, were out on the Corby Pond ice for some hands-on experience in learning how to teach ice rescue techniques. Their equipment included a Stokes basket, a firefighter’s pike and lots of ropes.Mr. Nouzovsky and other passers-by who stopped at the pond observed a series of rescues when a hole was cut into the pond ice. The three-day class teaches firefighters how to conduct an eight-hour class on the fundamentals of ice rescue.Dave Jephson, a trainer with Dive Rescue International, Fort Collins, Colo., conducted the class, which was sponsored by the St. Joseph Fire Department.“The primary concern in ice rescue is to get the victim and the rescuer to shore safely,” Mr. Jephson said.In some rescues, a victim may sustain cracked ribs during the recovery process, he said. That’s all right, if the rescuer succeeds in getting that person to shore, Mr. Jephson said. Those ribs will mend, he said. Mr. Jephson, who lives in British Columbia, Canada, said he was excited about the class.“Within a month these 16 instructors will have taught at least 320 other rescue personnel the ins and outs of ice rescue,” he said.The six men from the St. Joseph Fire Department are going to be instructing their entire department on ice rescue procedures, he said.The ice was about eight inches thick Saturday. The future instructors got a surprise when at one point during the class there was a loud cracking sound. A portion of the ice began to sink under their feet, but no one had to be rescued.Before leaving the scene, firefighters replaced the blocks of ice. The ice would refreeze overnight, Mr. Jephson said.Today, the new instructors will teach a class and be critiqued on their presentations, he said
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Lisbon Fire Dept. plucks dog from icy pond

    http://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/...ws/846576.html

    Saturday, January 25, 2003

    Family dog plucked to safety from icy pond

    By Amy Beth Preiss
    Norwich Bulletin

    LISBON, CT --Abbey is alive today thanks to the Lisbon Fire Department. The 3-year-old Australian cattle dog was rescued early Friday morning from the icy waters of a pond at 114 Town House Road. Rescuers with the volunteer fire department responded to a call at 4 a.m. that a canine had fallen through ice on a pond on the side of the house. The dog belongs to the Green family, who is thankful to the fire department. "My husband let the dog out to do her doggie thing," Mary Beth Green said Friday. Green said the dog decided to take a stroll on the pond, something it has done numerous times. She said the dog is usually very careful about walking on ice and usually gets off as soon as she hears a crack. "But then my husband heard her barking and he went right back out to find her," she said. There was one very small area of the pond that was not frozen and Green suspects her dog was trying to drink from that spot. Her husband attempted to rescue the dog using a ladder. When he was unsuccessful, the family called the fire department. Green said she suspects the dog was in the water for 45 minutes. "He realized he couldn't get her out himself," Green said. "We just can't believe it, most anything wouldn't have survived that. We can't believe she has no frostbite or anything. She is perfectly fine. We can't believe it. She is acting normal and actually wants to go back outside. The Lisbon Volunteer Fire Department was excellent. Deputy Fire Chief Thomas Sparkman said Chief Mark Robinson arrived on the scene to find that the small dog had fallen through the ice about 35 feet from shore in approximately 12 feet of water. Rescuers put on their cold water rescue suits, went out onto the pond, entered the frigid waters and rescued little Abbey, Sparkman said. "The little thing was just paddling away in the ice there waiting for us to get to her," Sparkman said. Sparkman said the department purchased the cold-water rescue suits late last year. And, by luck, Lisbon Fire Department members and members of the Baltic Fire Department completed a certification course last Sunday, which allowed rescuers to place the suits in service. "We just can't believe she is OK," Green said. "It's a miracle she is fine. The Lisbon Volunteer Fire Department was excellent."
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Rescue mission breaks the ice

    http://www.dailyrecord.com/news/03/0...s5-icenine.htm

    01/27/03
    The Daily Record

    Rescue mission breaks the ice

    By Abbott Koloff, Daily Record

    This time, they had time to talk about technique, to listen to instruction, and to correct mistakes. Members of Jefferson Fire Company No. 2 spent a cold morning on the ice of Lake Hopatcong, some of them in freezing water, where they practiced saving lives.John Zylinski, along with more than a dozen others, wore a protective neoprene suit, known as a Gumby suit, and practiced pulling people out of the water. He said this was nothing like the real thing, when his heart races, his adrenaline's pumping, and he races to save a victim whose body temperature is dropping."You know the clock is ticking," Zylinski said.More than 50 members of Fire Company No. 2, along with members of the Jefferson Township Rescue Squad, held an ice rescue practice session Sunday morning at the Lake Forest Yacht Club.Trip to lakeAt a time when many people were still curled up in bed, they gathered at headquarters and packed up equipment to take to the lake. Once there, men and women who during the week are accountants, salespeople and utility workers practiced riding a special two-pontoon sled that glides on ice and floats on water. They passed victims from the sled to a stretcher. They tested a rescue basket that can be placed on another sled and towed off the ice by an all-terrain vehicle."We try to do this once or twice a year," said Jonathon Van Norman, 28, chief of Fire Company No. 2 and a automobile sales manager.Officials said the company usually gets more than three calls each winter to rescue people from the lake. Sometimes, passers-by get victims out of the water before the ice rescue team arrives. Otherwise, firefighters know they sometimes have only minutes to save a victim before their body temperature drops too low.The company hasn't performed any rescues this year because the lake froze quickly, officials said, and there have been fewer areas of thin ice than usual. There weren't any rescues last year because the water didn't freeze. But there are plenty of snowmobiles on the lake this year, along with windsurfers, ice fishermen, ice skaters and people who simply like to stroll across the lake's frozen surface.And while the ice is 10 inches thick in places, Mickey DeLoreto, a past chief of Fire Company 2, said Lake Hopatcong is known for underwater springs producing areas of thin ice.Three years ago, the company rescued a man who had fallen through the ice while walking with his wife. The man helped his wife out of the water and she called 911, officials said. That was an especially difficult rescue, firefighters said, because it was dark and snowing.Also three years ago, a snowmobile hit some rocks in the middle of the lake and its passengers were injured. Firefighters commandeered passing snowmobiles in order to reach them. Since then, the township purchased two ATVs for the company.Tim Johnson, an 18-year-old firefighter, played the first victim of the day. He donned his Gumby suit and walked across the ice, looking for a good place to fall into the water. The Gumby suit offers protection in 35-degree water for about six hours but it's not completely sealed at the neck.DeLoreto, standing on a nearby dock, suggested that Johnson get on his hands and knees so he wouldn't fall straight down and be completely submerged, allowing water to seep into his suit. With water temperatures just above freezing, DeLoreto said that wouldn't be terribly comfortable.Bob Place, in the department for five years, straddled the pontoons of the rescue sled and pulled Johnson on board. He practiced the same maneuver several times while DeLoreto, standing on a nearby dock, made suggestions about how to fine-tune his technique. Performing a rescue in a Gumby suit can be tricky, firefighters said."You've got no flexibility," said Place, 41.Firefighters later practiced passing victims to rescue squad members. Bill Flatt, captain of the rescue squad, said his squad members would then cut off a victim's clothes and pack them in blankets to raise their body temperature. He said a victim can survive perhaps 10 to 15 minutes in the water.So firefighters practiced new techniques, such as getting in the water to get a sling around victims. Afterward, they went back to the firehouse, where they had soup and sandwiches, and their chief, Van Norman, reminded them of some of the dangers of ice rescues. All it takes is one misstep, he said, for a firefighter to go from rescuing someone to needing to be rescued.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Ice complicates water rescue attempts

    http://www.nj.com/popups/classifieds...l?zzDoNotCount

    Ice complicates water rescue attempts

    Tuesday, January 28, 2003

    By EMILY M. SHAFER
    Staff Writer

    Steering a boat through ice is no easy feat.
    But when there's an accident on frozen waters and the temperature is below freezing, sometimes it has to be done.

    This weekend the dangers of attempting to navigate and ice-filled river were illustrated again.
    U.S. Coast Guard workers and emergency personnel in Lower Alloways Creek Township responded to a small plane crash on Pea Patch Island on Sunday night, despite the portion of the Delaware River being frozen.
    "When there are icy conditions it will limit any type of boat you send out," said Lieutenant Commander Tim Meyers of the U.S. Coast Guard base in Philadelphia. "First thing we usually consider (in these conditions) is sending a helicopter."
    The atmospheric weather conditions, such as wind and visibility, also play a role in determining whether to send a helicopter or boat, Meyers said. Helicopters also have a swimmer on board.
    The LAC river rescue team responded to Sunday's plane crash, but when they got halfway there, the ice in the Delaware River shifted, LAC Fire Chief David Hinchman said. They had to wait for tugboats to come out and break the ice. Two tugboats did come and the rescue boat followed close behind.
    According to Hinchman, the river hasn't been frozen this bad since the mid 1990's. LAC Fire Department is one of two departments in the county that has marine rescue capabilities, the other being Salem.
    "This is the first time we ever really had a problem getting out in the winter," Hinchman said. "Everybody was trying to get through the ice. Some ice clusters are sharp enough to cut a hole in the regular boat if you hit it hard enough."
    Meyers said that the Coast Guard station has two ice breaker boats that are on call all the time for search and rescue. They also have larger ice breaker boats that are also buoy tenders. They may send one of those, depending on what vessel is closer to the area.
    On Sunday, they sent a buoy tender and also dispatched a helicopter. When rescuers from New Jersey and Delaware arrived on Pea Patch Island, they found the burned single-engine plane. The two people aboard were killed.
    "In the last few years, we haven't had conditions that were quite this bad," Meyers said. "Icy conditions do limit our response capabilities. We are not able to respond as we could without the ice."
    Aside from getting through the ice, Hinchman said that one of the main concerns is preventing hypothermia. There are special suits that the rescuers where so they don't get frostbitten. Hinchman also said that paramedics check the volunteers when they come back to make sure they're OK.
    "When the river is frozen in the winter, marine rescue is a lot harder to do," Hinchman said.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Another snowmobile goes into Winnebago

    http://www.wisinfo.com/thereporter/n..._8524043.shtml

    Feb. 05, 2003

    Another snowmobile goes into Winnebago

    By Lee Reinsch
    the reporter

    Winnebago Co., WI - Despite the fact that two men died on Lake Winnebago over the weekend and that officials are telling people to stay off the ice, another snowmobiler went through the ice on Tuesday.Luckily, the person involved in the most recent mishap wasn’t hurt.
    Fire Department Battalion Chief Toby Leeds says the man had been snowmobiling on the Fond du Lac River channel and had just gotten to the mouth of the river at Lake Winnebago when he hit thin ice and went through.It happened around 6 p.m. Tuesday about 30 feet offshore from Frazier Point, in the same spot two cars went through the ice a week ago, said Leeds. No one was hurt in that incident a week ago, either.
    Two other cars went though the ice early Monday morning, resulting in the drowning of Zacheria Pickart, 19, of Fond du Lac. A 36-year-old Ripon man, Dennis Scheuers, was killed Saturday night when his snowmobile hit a chunk of ice and went airborne, throwing him from the machine.Regarding Tuesday’s incident, Leeds said, “He was up and out of the water right away.”
    Leeds said his department did not take down the man’s name after checking him out. “He was cold and wet, but that’s about it,” said Leeds.The water was very shallow in the spot where Tuesday’s snowmobiler went through the ice. Leeds estimates it at only two or three feet.
    “You could see the handlebars (of the snowmobile) sticking up out of the water,” Leeds said.Department of Natural Resources Conservation Warden Ed McCann says the ice is dangerous and people should stay away from it. He said he has several public talks slated over the next two days in which he will try to get the message out to the public. He will speak on local radio stations.
    Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Department Chief Deputy Mick Fink has deemed ice conditions on Lake Winnebago “treacherous.”
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Frantic effort made to save life on icy lake

    http://www.wisinfo.com/thereporter/n..._8492874.shtml

    Feb. 04, 2003

    Frantic effort made to save life
    Attempts fail after two cars plunge into open water

    By Peggy Breister
    the reporter

    Winnebago, WI - Seven young men did everything they could to rescue a friend after the cars in which they were riding plunged into the icy waters of Lake Winnebago shortly after 11 p.m. Sunday, Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Department officials say.Zacharia Pickart, 19, of 533 Monmouth St., was the driver of one of two cars that drove into open water about 1½-miles from the West Shore and about the same distance north of Lakeside Park.
    Preliminary autopsy results indicate Pickart drowned, said Sheriff’s Department Detective Chip Capoyianes. Sheriff’s Department divers found him under the water about eight feet from his vehicle shortly after 9 a.m. Monday.The accident comes one year to the day that Fond du Lac resident Rose Roberts died when her snowmobile went into open water on Lake Winnebago.
    Pickart and two friends were in a car following another car on the lake shortly after 11 p.m. when the driver of the first car realized he was off a marked ice road and was heading toward open water, according to Sheriff’s Department reports. The driver of the first car, Chad Fraley, 23, of Taycheedah, tried to stop but his car was struck in the rear end by Pickart’s car and both cars plunged into a large hole in the ice. They were traveling about 30 mph, according to reports.Sheriff’s Department Chief Deputy Mick Fink said the second car hit the first car with enough force to discharge the airbag in the second car and cause front-end damage.
    Fraley and four passengers in his car — Ben Freiberg, 19, of 332 Sibley St.; Ben Johnson, 21, of 354 Bank St.; Steven Scott, 23, of 565 W. Scott St.; and William Van Gorder, 22, of 448 N. Hickory St. — were able to get out of the vehicle.
    Pickart and two passengers in his car — Blake Freiberg, 15, and Bryan Freiberg, 20, both of 332 Sibley St. — also were able to get out of Pickart’s car. Pickart was holding on to two of the Freiberg brothers, but he lost his hold and disappeared into the water as they worked their way to ice that would support their weight, according to a report.
    The seven moved around to distribute their weight on the thin ice, Capoyianes said.
    “They were cold. They were shaken up,” he said. “I think they did everything they could to try and rescue their friend.”
    Although most of the occupants of Fraley’s car had been drinking prior to the accident, only one person was cited for underage drinking. Tests of the other passengers revealed that they did not meet the requirements for alcohol citations, according to the report.
    Before the seven walked more than a mile to shore to get help, one of them pushed some snow into a pile to mark the spot where the cars went into the water. The cars sank to the bottom in about eight to 10 feet of water.Some of the people in the cars were very familiar with the lake and had spent time on the lake earlier in the day ice fishing, according to the report.Fraley said he was driving on the lake when a car started following him. He told Sheriff’s Department officers he didn’t know at first who was in the other vehicle.
    “We told him two days ago, ‘Don’t go out there at night,’” Fraley’s mother, Karen Fraley of Taycheedah, said Monday. “He said, ‘Oh Mom, it will be all right.’ Now he sees… We’ve had a rough night.”
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Department eyes purchase of ice rescue boat

    http://www.wisinfo.com/thereporter/n..._8492962.shtml

    Posted Feb. 04, 2003

    Sheriff’s Department eyes purchase of ice rescue boat

    By Peggy Breister
    the reporter

    If the accident that sent two cars into the icy waters of Lake Winnebago around midnight Sunday had occurred two weeks from now, the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Department may have had a quicker means of getting to the cars and the missing driver.

    On Tuesday, Feb. 11, the Fond du Lac County Board will be asked to support a resolution from two committees for the purchase of a $30,000 iceboat (airboat).

    A public hearing on the purchase will be held during the meeting because the money necessary for the purchase is not part of the budget. Two-thirds of the board must then support the purchase.In recent years, the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Department has relied on hovercrafts from the Winnebago County Sheriff’s Department to assist in rescue efforts on Lake Winnebago.“They were our ace in the hole,” said Fond du Lac County Sheriff Gary Pucker. “But they’re down right now.”The hovercrafts were damaged during a rescue attempt on the lake more than a month ago. Both are being repaired, and one should be operational sometime later this month, a spokeswoman for the Winnebago County Sheriff’s Department said. The other is expected to be down longer.

    Without the option of using a hovercraft from Winnebago County, the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Department was forced to call Michigan and Green Lake County for help in the attempted rescue early Monday on Lake Winnebago. The U.S. Coast Guard in Traverse City, Mich., could not fly early Monday due to the weather. The Sheriff’s Department dive team was whisked to the scene by a hovercraft from Princeton. Fond du Lac County will be billed for the use of the craft and the time spent by emergency workers.Through some detective legwork, the department located a used Ice Angel airboat in Princeton, Minn.
    The boat (airboat) can run on ice, snow or water and is powerful enough to cut through marsh vegetation. It has a front hoist for retrieving submerged items.

    Although purchasing an iceboat(airboat)like this one may cost about $83,000 if it were new, the owner of the boat is willing to sell it to the department for $30,000. Chief Deputy Mick Fink traveled to Minnesota and checked out the boat. He said it is in good working order and could be ready to go as a local rescue boat in a couple of days after it is purchased. When the Sheriff’s Department has to rescue someone off the lake, the person rescued may be billed for the use of the boat. Likewise, if the boat is used in mutual aid rescues with neighboring departments, those departments would be billed as well. The fee, he said, would be $500 for the craft and about $34 per hour for each officer involved in the rescue.“We have to find a way to pay for the boat,” Pucker said. “This is one way to do that.”The department has no choice, he said. “This office shares a large responsibility for Lake Winnebago and we have to have the equipment to respond,” Pucker said. “Last night was a classic example of what can go wrong out there,” he said Monday.
    Last edited by H2oAirRsQ; 02-23-2003 at 10:03 AM.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Plow driver saved after icy plunge into river

    http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?...VFeXk2MzM5MzU3

    Plow driver saved after icy plunge into river

    February 9, 2003

    By RAGHURAM VADAREVU
    Staff Writer

    HACKENSACK - Firefighters rescued a driver from a pickup truck Saturday morning after the vehicle plowed through a chain-link fence and slid down the bank of the Hackensack River near The Record's River Street headquarters.
    The front of the truck was submerged in the icy water, and rescue personnel worked quickly and used some ingenuity to pull Carmine Romano safely from the truck as water trickled into the cab, a fire official said.
    Romano, a longtime employee of North Jersey Media Group, The Record's parent company, was treated at Hackensack University Medical Center for minor injuries and released, officials said.
    "The response from the Fire Department and the paramedics was great," said Harry Schmidt, the company's safety manager. "They were in there, did their job very professionally, and left."
    Romano's ordeal began late Friday night at the end of his shift. Using a truck with a plow, he was clearing the last snow from the parking lot outside the company's home-delivery distribution center and repair shop, Schmidt said.
    Schmidt said the truck may have hit a patch of ice and skidded off the pavement across a strip of gravel about 15 feet wide, through the fence.
    About 12:06 a.m. Saturday, firefighters arrived and tied the cable from the rescue truck's winch to the rear axle of the pickup so it would not slip further into the river, said Deputy Fire Chief Joel Thornton.
    "It appeared as if the truck was down in the mud in the bank area, but you can never be sure," Thornton said.
    Rescue personnel decided against launching the Fire Department's rescue boat because the river was clogged with ice floes, Thornton said.
    Deputy Fire Chief Ed Virgin, who was on the scene, had a solution, Thornton said.
    First, Firefighters Mike Martinelli and Joe Ackerman were tethered by lifelines. Then, they gingerly went down the riverbank and along the truck, and pulled Romano out the rear window, Thornton said.
    After the save, Martinelli and Ackerman ended their 24-hour shifts at 8 a.m. Saturday, Thornton said.
    Romano was recovering at home.
    The company was investigating the incident.


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    Default One dead, three rescued after thin ice gives way

    http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial...09/1013331.asp

    One dead, three rescued after thin ice gives way

    By JAY REY
    News Staff Reporter
    2/9/2003

    One person died and three others - including a 10-year-old boy - were rescued in two separate incidents Saturday, after venturing onto thin ice on area waterways. A North Tonawanda man died in the freezing waters of the Erie Canal on Saturday afternoon, after he and his 10-year-old son tried to walk across the ice-covered canal. A couple of hours later, two ice fishermen fell into Lake Erie off Hamburg Town Beach. Both were able to get out of the water safely; they were spotted and picked up by an Erie County Sheriff's Department helicopter two to three miles off the Hamburg shoreline. "No ice is safe ice," Sheriff Patrick M. Gallivan said Saturday, "especially with the shifting, high winds we have been having. Predictability of the ice can change from hour to hour with these winds." Andrew Heft, 35, of Old Falls Boulevard in North Tonawanda, died in the Erie Canal, but only after he helped get his son out of the water and safely to shore on Old Niagara Falls Boulevard in Amherst. Divers pulled Heft's body from the canal shortly after 5 p.m., about three hours after he and his son, Michael Daken of Mead Street, North Tonawanda, slipped through the ice. Heft was able to boost his son out of the water onto more solid ice so that a witness could drag the boy to shore, Amherst police said. "Witnesses said that the father actually helped get the boy out of the water," said Amherst Police Lt. Stephen McGonagle. "And then he went down," McGonagle said. Michael - who lives with his mother, Jennifer Daken - was taken to Women's and Children's Hospital, where he was recovering Saturday night, authorities said. "They're getting his body temperature up. He's awake and alert. He sounds pretty good," Amherst Police Lt. Paul Fels said Saturday night. It began with a trip to McDonald's on Saturday afternoon. The father and son left Heft's home on Old Falls Boulevard in North Tonawanda, which abuts the northwest border of Amherst. The two were walking to the nearby McDonald's restaurant on Niagara Falls Boulevard, but noticed that their route - the bridge on Robinson Road - was congested with traffic, according to what Daken told police. Instead, the two decided to walk across the ice-covered canal, which runs near Heft's home. The section of the canal they chose to cross is just north of Robinson Road, near North Tonawanda's Botanical Gardens and Greenhouse. It's here where the canal splits Old Niagara Falls Boulevard in Amherst and Sweeney Street-Old Falls Boulevard in North Tonawanda. A small park and boat launch on the North Tonawanda side provide easy access to the water. The father and son were about 20 yards from shore, or closer, when they hit a thin spot in the ice and fell through, McGonagle said. The two apparently kept trying to get onto the ice, but the ice kept breaking, authorities said. A young girl spotted the two struggling in the water and ran to get her father, John Harrison, who lives nearby, police said. Harrison grabbed a 100-foot extension cord and tossed it to the father and son. "Mr. Heft was able to push the boy out onto the ice, and Mr. Harrison dragged (Michael) to shore," Fells said. "Shortly after, Mr. Heft slipped under the ice." Police received a call at about 2:15 p.m., and the search for Heft began. Responding to the scene were Amherst, North Tonawanda and state police, the Coast Guard and firefighters from the Ellicott Creek, Getzville, North Amherst, Wendelville, Clarence Center, East Amherst and North Tonawanda fire companies. The Sheriff's Department helicopter helped break the ice on the canal and searched for Heft from the air. Divers found Heft's body in the frigid, dark water just after 5 p.m., about 20 yards from shore. Police said it's not unusual for people to walk on the ice covering the canal. Meanwhile, Saturday morning in Hamburg, David E. Crawford, 45, of Hamburg, and his fishing partner, William Nelson Jr., 39, no address available, drove a snowmobile and heavy sled about three miles onto the Lake Erie ice, sheriff's officials said. As they began to pack up to leave sometime before 5 p.m., the snowmobile and sled went through the ice. The fishermen were able to get out of the water, but their snowmobile, sled and equipment were lost. The two had been walking on the ice toward shore for about 20 minutes before Capt. Kevin Caffery and Flight Officer Art Litzinger, in the sheriff's helicopter on a routine patrol, spotted the two and picked them up. Crawford could not be reached to comment Saturday night. "These men are lucky to be alive," Caffery said. "This year, we have seen an abundance of people venturing farther and farther out onto the ice, either using their all-terrain vehicles or snowmobiles. It is a dangerous practice and could be deadly."
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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    Default Snowmobiler lost in whiteout rescued

    http://www.portclintonnewsherald.com...ws/970763.html

    Snowmobiler lost in whiteout rescued

    News Herald reports
    PUT-IN-BAY, WI -- A Coast Guard helicopter crew from Detroit rescued a Rattlesnake Island snowmobiler from frozen Lake Erie early this morning after he spent three hours on the ice. The man, Pete Lacomb, was taken by a Coast Guard rescue helicopter to Magruder Hospital, where he was released after treatment. Early reports show Lacomb was last seen around 11 p.m. on his snowmobile between South Bass Island and Rattlesnake Island. A caller reported to the Coast Guard that his headlights disappeared when winds swirled to nearly 50 mph and a whiteout engulfed Lacomb and his snowmobile. The Coast Guard dispatched its helicopter rescue crew from Detroit to search for him, and after nearly three hours they spotted him, according to reports.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

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