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  1. #1
    Forum Member WFDjr1's Avatar
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    Default Now that things are back to normal(I hope)... A winter ops question.

    What are some of the things you guys do to prepare for the winter firefighting season, and what are some things you do differently in the winter that seem to work well regarding exterior ops and other things we do? And yes, I slightly borrowed this idea and modified it a little bit from the senior's forum. Hopefully, it's also better than the "What lights and sirens?" stuff that's been going on too.
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

    Johnny Greene: 2/3/45-5/2/04
    Forever in our hearts


  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Top tips for winter junior firefighting ops:

    *keep an extra set of clothes in your locker at the firehouse
    *wear wool socks (bunker boots are little more than steel shank and rubber, they don't insulate well from the cold, especially when you're standing in a snow drift.
    *keep a couple packages of those little hand warmer thingies in your pockets
    *be careful of ice, especially if you have to go into surround and drown mode and there is a lot of water flowing (and don't laugh at the chief when he slips and falls...it'll probably be you sitting on the ice next )
    *learn from the more experienced FFs... they know how to deal with the specific weather conditions that your region gets.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber Engine58's Avatar
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    Default WELLLLLL

    Well...First I put new Brighter Bulbs and More strobes on my vehicle toget through the dense blinding snow...to quicken my response to the firehouse..JUST KIDDING!! Had to do it..anyways..I keep an extra set of work gloves in my turnout jacket for BS work around the scene..Rollin hose, setting up ladders etc... Other than that I use my regular gloves.. I carry and extra nomex hood in case the other one gets wet for some reason...and carry extra socks in my jacket also with the rest of the junk in my pockets I was thinking about buying the hand warmers but we really never get any extended operations in winter time...But I guess its better to be prepared..theres always a first time...
    Andrew
    Firefighter/EMT
    New Jersey

  4. #4
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    We put our Juniors/Cadets on Speedy Dry duty. When icing is occurring, they spread speedy dry and/or sand (when available) on the ice to help with traction around the fire scene. Lot's of lights help in the dark also. When we have a big snow, they get together and make sure hydrants are shoveled out.

    WFDjr1 - good thread.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    keep dry socks and gloves at the station and becare full when your are out doing stuff and driving to the station.
    never forget 343 FDNY
    in memory of 40 ENGINE/35 TRUCK
    normal people spend their life's avoiding intense situations.....a fireman's life is an intence situation.

  6. #6
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    Have a can of windshield de icer sitting by your keys to quickly clear your windshield. They only cost a buck or two and melt the ice in seconds.

  7. #7
    Member smatt2003's Avatar
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    we have an air supply/rehab trailer for fires and when it comes time for winter we stock it with extra blankets and extra lighting and coffee to prep for the winter fires
    FF. EMT-B M. Hesek
    Northborough Fire Dept
    Northborough MA

    NEVER FORGET DECEMBER 3rd '99

  8. #8
    Forum Member WFDjr1's Avatar
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    Well...First I put new Brighter Bulbs and More strobes on my vehicle toget through the dense blinding snow...to quicken my response to the firehouse..JUST KIDDING!!
    LOL! You forgot to add that new speaker to your siren and put some sort of cover over your Federal "air raid" siren that is on the roof of your vehicle, to prevent it from being clogged with snow.

    Thanks for the responses guys, there are some really good pointers in here. Another thing I have learned over the past few weeks is that if you are allowed to perform some sort of overhaul work using the booster reel, be sure to leave the nozzle cracked open to keep the pump cool, as well as keep the hose from freezing. Frozen rubber hose doesn't go back on the reel too well. You guys stay safe out there and keep the ideas coming!
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

    Johnny Greene: 2/3/45-5/2/04
    Forever in our hearts

  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    Default I case of Snow

    Change of cloths (but thats just common sense) and I found that if your doing flowing or anything wet, wear a pair of ems gloves inside your bunker gloves, because eventually they will get wet and then your hands will go very numb. And those hand warmers things arnt worth it in my opinion cause for the most part your hands are being used and then they get in the way if there in your gloves. And sometimes down where my local is, we haft to use some of the members four wheelers(quads) to respond to some calls cause of the snow.
    "DISTRICT 63 FOR LIFE!!" ~Me

    "There is nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer" ~Thomas Jefferson

    When I die, burry me deep. Place the stereo by my feet. Put the speakers by my head, and play for me, some greatful dead.

  10. #10
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    I don't know how much the medical gloves will protect you from the cold, although maybe the fire gloves on top will take care of that part. I work at a gas station(cleaning), and the mechanics and I wear latex gloves such that our hands are not completely covered in oil, .... After emptying the outside trash cans, and putting some tires into the dumpster (10 mins), I went back inside, and could barely feel my hands. LOL It does appear that the gloves would be very useful to protect from moisture, but I'm going to get something to keep the hands warm. (I don't really mind being cold too much[see funny story below], but any wetness and cold I cannot stand!)

    Funny Story
    -After 2nd Alarm Dwelling Fire
    Rolling hose at 11PM, begins to snow heavily for about 30 seconds, extremely cold. I in shorts and t-shirt from work, am rolling hose next to another junior, wearing jeans and turnout coat to stay warm. They keep saying I'm crazy and I don't know why!
    Last edited by JRFireman; 12-23-2002 at 03:35 PM.
    Any statements I have made are my statements, and my statements alone.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber fyrfyter33's Avatar
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    Default

    If its about to get frigid, our biggest thing, is draining the pumps on all the trucks, so that you have to reprime them before you start pumping, that or we make sure that the truck is at least circulating at low idle any time the truck sits at any scene. In addition to this, all vehicles are left running at the scene and the hospital too so the drugs don't freeze. Squad heaters that can be turned on from the front control panel of the squad are nice too, so the box is nice and warm when you get in it.

  12. #12
    Junior Member
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    Default Maby I didnt make myself clear

    "I don't know how much the medical gloves will protect you from the cold, although maybe the fire gloves on top will take care of that part" ~JRFireman

    Maby I didnt make it clear on what I was saying. If you flowing water and you have your bunker gloves on, they will get wet, and there for your hands will get wet and very numb. By wearing the medical gloves under your bunker gloves your hands wont get wet, and therefore they can get warmed up faster.
    "DISTRICT 63 FOR LIFE!!" ~Me

    "There is nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer" ~Thomas Jefferson

    When I die, burry me deep. Place the stereo by my feet. Put the speakers by my head, and play for me, some greatful dead.

  13. #13
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    I know, I was just saying that you might want to get something to keep them warm after as well.
    Any statements I have made are my statements, and my statements alone.

  14. #14
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    Default

    -Extra clothes in locker at the station.
    -2 pairs of socks.
    -Wear my winter Nomex.
    -Get a truck to get to the station, although in Minnesota it's been kind of a downer year for snow.
    -Have a 2 or 3 extra pairs of gloves.
    -Hand warmers.
    -Sand for ice.
    -Drink the hot coffee/hot chocolate the fire fighter's wives give you on scene.

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