1. #1
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Below Whale sh#@ on the sea bottom
    Posts
    7

    Default Dump Truck Roof??

    Here is the scenerio for you, a dump truck vers mini van head on, 55 mph plus roadway, severe damage to front of mini-van(driver was ejected and DOA on arrival).

    You have the driver of the truck which is a single axle truck with a grain style box on the rear laying on the passenger side, the driver is laying agianst the door, with her head between the ground and the roof(ground is soft, snowy). The truck is on a small bank leaning slightly downhill(truck is empty), but seems fairly stable, the patient is concious and able to verbalize, no odvious injuries are noted. Your heavy rescue has arrived on scene, a second rescue is responding, WHAT WOULD YOU DO??

    Do you remove the roof, or flap it?? How would you stabalize?? What is your first priority??

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    rmoore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    819

    Default

    I don't understand exactly if the patient is pinned along the bottom of the cab or not. From your scenario, it sounds like there may be no entrapment.

    You also mentioned a slight embankment and the soft, snow-covered ground to consider.

    In truck rollovers such as this, hazard control that includes stabilization is always near the top of the list of things you must do. Since the truck was empty, your hazards include things such as vehicle fluids, electrical shutdown, working near sources of heat along the underside of the vehicle, traffic control along the roadway, scene lighting if it were a nighttime incident, and vehicle stabilization.

    You would not want the truck to slide or roll any further over since you will be working on the downhill side to free the patient. I don't know how much of an incline you're talking about or if the vehicle has sunk into the ground and is pretty well settled. With your organization's resources, you could use the winch on Rescue 7 if that can be rigged up to exert a pulling, tension force on the underside of the truck. Your Hurst ram could also be used on the downhill side as a strut since you don't have actual strut stabilization equipment on your Rescue.

    Initial access to a patient inside the cab of a truck like you described is almost always done through the windshield opening. The rubber-mounted glass probably even fell out during the rollover anyway. If the windshield would be obstructed for some reason, your alternative initial access point would be to open the driver's door and crawl down inside to establish patient contact.

    Once the scene is stable, hazards controlled, and patient access established, total roof removal is the recommended protocol. If you decide to "flap" a roof in this case, consider cutting the driver's A-pillar and the fatter driver's side B-pillar and laying the roof structure down towards the ground. Flapping the roof rearward as you might do for a vehicle on its' wheels would not be as effective here.

    I had a cement truck rollover similar to your scenario. The uninjured driver got himself free of his seatbelt, kicked out the windshield, and climbed out before we arrived. Looks a lot like the scenario you described.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    rmoore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    819

    Default

    Speaking of this type of truck in a rollover, here's an example of where the challenge of vehicle stabilization can get a little bit more intense.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
    rmoore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    819

    Default

    Yes, the cab has separated from the chassis of this truck. It is a vehicle specially designed to haul new trash dumpsters around. This vehicle was hit off-center head-on by an 18-wheeler rock hauler that crossed the double yellow center line.

    Murphy TX Fire Rescue crews initially accessed the driver through the passenger's door window. The injured driver was not trapped within the loose cab so he was longboarded out the passenger's door once it was opened.
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  5. #5
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Below Whale sh#@ on the sea bottom
    Posts
    7

    Default Sorry Ron!

    It's kinda hard to explain without any pictures, the truck came to rest very similar to the pic of the cement truck you showed. The driver's head was trapped under the roof, what would have been the top of the window and that section of the roof that runs with it. She also layed in a position inside the truck that would afford no room to work or get her out through the windshield opening.

    Hopefully that will better explain the scenerio and with a few replies I will let you know what actually was done and what a few of us learned from it.

  6. #6
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Below Whale sh#@ on the sea bottom
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Wish that I had a pic to share with you, the drivers head was under the truck but not crushing it. An airbag was used to take any remaining wieght of the driver's head, but her torso was in a position the did not allow us to remove her thru the window. Lot,s of small cribbing was used but seemed to do very little good, when all was siad and done a winch, plus the airbag and several peices of cribbing were used to lift the truck only a few inches. We had long cribs to make an "A" frame with us but were not used. The windshield was removed, "A" post's cut with recip saw, then the "B" post was attempted with recip saw and "O" cutters, this proved to be tuff. Eventually that was abandoned for a relief cut in the roof and flap.

    The "B" post was much thicker, wider and heavier constructed than that of a normal car, attempting to cut this proved to be a waste of time when a roof flap could have been performed.

    Although we had worked and trained several times before with the other rescue company, we share two very different modes of operation on scene, although this rescue went fairly well and timely, it could have went better given more interaction and understanding between the two. I would have liked to seen more efoort on the stabalization of the vehicle and was not the only person with the same view.

    We have had a few extrications involving larger vehicles and always call a second company for the extra tools, cribbing and manpower as these calls generally take more than one rescue can handle well on it's own.

  7. #7
    Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Agreeing with 12Rescue7, the first picture that rmoore posted is quite similar to the position of the truck in our incident, though our truck had sustained much more front-end damage. Here is an article that was posted, the second pic is the extrication from the truck and the first is what was left of the minivan:
    http://www.withthecommand.com/2002-Dec/PA-gvems.html
    You can see Res7cue in the background of the second picture, when its winch was hooked to the underside of the truck. It's not really a good picture, but it provides some clarification.
    12Rescue7, what do you think of me using the sawzall if I had room to maneuver it when I was inside the cab with the pt, as the pillars were above and just forward of me? In hindsight, it seems like it would have been an easy cut from that point, instead of climbing on the truck. Then again, hindsight is 20/20...

    TIMMY!

  8. #8
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Below Whale sh#@ on the sea bottom
    Posts
    7

    Default

    drkblram-

    There wasn't an issue as far as the power tools go, just the width and strength of the post was more than could be cut in a timely fashion(hind sight is 20/20 you know). As far the hydraulics go, both company's have a hurst certified service company complete a yearly service on the entire set. This was just done about 1 month before the incident, so failure is highly unlikely.

  9. #9
    FIGJAM
    lutan1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    I come from The Land Down Under!
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    I've attended 2 MVA's just like this in the last year. (Involving cars, not trucks)

    Why does everyone seem to go for airbags to lift the vehicle? Unless the bags and air are set up and on line as soon as you get there, they can be very cumbersome to set up.

    Why not use your hydraulic spreaders? In most vehicles they're set up and live as soon as you arrive. Place your cribbing as you lift the load and away you go! By cribbing as you lift, you're not tieing up your tool in case it's needed for something else....
    Luke

  10. #10
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Below Whale sh#@ on the sea bottom
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Lutan-

    That would be a consideration but, the ground was pretty soft. We could have used a plywood sheet to help as we carry them for use with our air bags. My favorite for lifting a car or small truck would be high-lift(farm jack). Much faster than having to wait for power tools to be deployed.

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Here's my take on the dump.If it were resting like the mixer I would take my first heavy rescue and position it so I could run a two part line to a chain bridle set front to rear of the dump, set to the lower frame or a strong suspension member.This should keep the dump from sliding.As the second rescue becomes available (assuming they both have winches)I would rig a two part line to a SHORT bridle running from about the rear front spring shackle to just behind the cab around the frame.Just lightly tension this line for now.Rig your bags or hydraulics,make sure you have ample cribbing.Now start the lift.As you do continue to tension the UPPER winch line.The bags/hyds and the winch interact to give you a controlled slow lift.Once you have gained the required space secure the crib(I hope you've been cribbing as you go)and complete the rescue.At this point you can secure your tools and cribbing or wait for the tow truck and get the cribbing at this point.Of course if I had my druthers I'd rather use tow trucks,but I thought I'd let you do it with your own stuff this time. Now on the "lugger"(refuse truck)you really only have two problems.If the "can"hasn't fallen off at this point it is HIGHLY UNLIKELY that it will.Chock the chassis anywhere and everywhere you can and secure the cab.Case closed.Going to be a pain for the poor sob that has to tow it though,BTDT.Nylon ratchet straps are a wonderful thing. Anyone interested there is a similar rescue that has been performed at WWW.Tow 411/Towing & Recovery/December spotlight using a heavy tow truck.A good job with a happy ending.Merry Christmas everyone,you too Luke!T.C.
    Last edited by Rescue101; 12-24-2002 at 08:41 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register