1. #1
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    Default Denied... I live too far away

    Well, I got my letter from the POC station I applied at stating that I live too far away to be considered for employment. I called the station to find out their boundaries, and it looks like I'm about 2-miles too far away. So... on goes the search. I'm planning on moving soon, so I'm going to head in the direction of the next nearest POC station, and hope for the best.

    One question though. If I'm not able to get on board one of these two stations, should I just apply at a full-time station and see if they'll take me part-time? I'd rather not go full-time just yet, but I do want to get my foot in the door as well as get started on my training.

    Any advice?

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    Default

    From past experiance, if a FD does not have any part-time employees, they aren't even going to look at anyone that doesn't want to be full-time. Apply to career departments and take your chances. They'll train you if you don't have it already. Departments don't just make spots for people who want part-time employment. Good luck

    *Mark
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    Not to belittle a great career, but. Working for a career dept. is almost like working part-time, depending on how they run thier shifts. That is one of the best benefits of this job. Start applying now, the process can be very lengthy and the tests are usually not given that often. You can always turn down a spot if offered it. Good luck.
    When Life Is On The Line. We Are Never Off Duty.

  4. #4
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    When applying at full-time stations, do I need to wait for a testing date... or can I go ahead and put in an application? Also, do they hang on to the application for a while, or do I have to re-apply every few months?

  5. #5
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    Question No Easy Answer.....

    Ratchet, You have some very valid questions, but there are no easy answers to the questions. Paid jobs in the vast majority of places are a government function, from start to finish. You are not a fire dept. employee, you are a government employee. State, County, City, Fire District,.... Lots of variations on that alone. I have never seen a situation where two jurisdictions do everything the same. First, I wouldn't waste a lot of time looking for applications a fire stations. Go to the personnel office of that jurisdiction. They are almost always the place that controls hiring. Second, We have a 24 on, 72 off shift here. I know people on my dept. who commute from 5 other STATES. That's right, 5 other states. We could care less where you live, just so you get to work when you are supposed to. Avoid any dept. that has a residency requirement, anyone who is that far back will have other problems also. (still using horses?) Hopefully, one day there will be a law barring that sort of stupidity, but don't hold your breath. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    When applying at full-time stations, do I need to wait for a testing date... or can I go ahead and put in an application? Also, do they hang on to the application for a while, or do I have to re-apply every few months?
    Most dept's do make you wait for an open application period. Thier are some where you can file an interest card and they will then notify you when they are accepting applications. Once you submit your ap you will be notified when the next step is. After the testing is over and if you did not get on, you would need to reapply whenever they start accepting aps again. basicly you just have to watch the cities web site, local newpaper and if you know people on the dept that can tell you too.

    Avoid any dept. that has a residency requirement, anyone who is that far back will have other problems also. (still using horses?) Hopefully, one day there will be a law barring that sort of stupidity, but don't hold your breath

    While I agree with the last part of your statement, the first part is painting with a large brush. My city does have a residency requirement, but sometimes they don't apply it. That is how I got on, unless your a lateral entry medic. then it does not matter at all. Strange how that works. I am going to be pressing the Unions to fight to get this 1970 ruling out so that all of the people who really want this job can get it and not limit it to city residents. heck most people just get a city address if they want it bad enough, not to mention how many guys live in PA. There are several "big" cities that have a residency requirement of some sort and are considered some of the best.
    Last edited by McpFFemt; 12-29-2002 at 10:53 AM.
    When Life Is On The Line. We Are Never Off Duty.

  7. #7
    55 Years & Still Rolling
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    Red face Oops..............

    Hope I wasn't misunderstood..... My blatant dislike for residency requirements is directed solely at the politicians. In no way do I have anything detrimental to say about a brother. In fact, I would think that most of you would join me in opposing residency because it limits talent available to the department. Do you want to work with someone who really wants to do the job, or with one of those "I live here and I'm entitled..." loads? Sorry there I go again. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  8. #8
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    Lightbulb

    Our volunteer company has a rule that requires active members to live within the limits of the fire district. This seems to work out well in that it allows a somewhat reasonable response time.

    A few of our neighboring companies have done away with this type of rule only to find problems with members getting mad and quitting and going to the station in the next town. A few stations have had to install revolving doors to accomodate this practice. I know one guy that needs velcro on his turnout coat to change the dep't name on the back.

    One company a few years back found after a few months that ALL of it's active members lived outside the district.

    I can see the reasoning of hwoods and others regarding residency requirements for larger career/combination dep'ts. But for our small rural volunteer company, It seems to be a good thing. It essentially does away with the "I'll take my toys and go play in somebody elses sandbox" crowd. They may leave, but they cannot ride the fence.

    Just my opinion,

    Stay Safe,

    Jim

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    I think you need to decide what your end goal is here.

    First of all, if you want to become a full-time paid firefighter, you need to find out what the requirements are for the departments that you want to work for. Some career departments have residency requirements---some don't. Some require residency for up to a year before hiring.

    Depending on where you want to be a full-time firefighter will have an effect on what you do now. For instance, the Tulsa FD could care less if you have every certificate in the book or have rank at your local house--they run everyone through basic FF academy and EMT upon hiring.

    For several suburbs of Tulsa, your experience may get you hired over a less experienced applicant.

    It's different everywhere.

    If you want to be a volunteer, POC or part-time firefighter, things are different. Again, individual residency requirement go from one extreme to the other, but there are a lot more volunteer, POC and parttime houses out there than full-time.

    So....

    Decide what it is you want to do and make an educated decision. If you're moving to get closer to a fire station so you can get on, don't you think it would be better if you knew you would be eligible before you invest the time and money?
    Bryan Beall
    Silver City, Oklahoma USA

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    Default

    Thank you all for the reply's. I can understand a residency restriction from the aspect that there needs to be a reasonable response time from all firefighters... otherwise a truck would be sitting there waiting while the house is burning.

    As for my goal, yes, I want to get on to a full time department. I've done a little checking, and it seems like they want you to be an EMT-B before getting on board. The POC stations around here put you through the training, so getting on board with one of them would be very beneficial. I think I've figured out where I'm moving to, and the POC station in that town gets around 1500 calls a year. I believe they actually have two stations. If I can't get on with them, then there's one more POC station a town over that I may have a shot at.

    I guess in the mean time, I'm going to go through my First Responder course (starts January 14th), and just keep plugging away at schooling until I get hired somewhere. Hopefully, it'll be sooner than later though... I'm getting tired of being a mechanic.

    Thanks again guys! Any more advice would be much appreciated.

  11. #11
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    Default

    I'm about 2-miles too far away.
    Seems kind of anal to me--- 2 Miles is not far enough--did they even give you an opportunity to relocate?

    Seems to me like it's thier loss, not yours~ Keep searching! You find something~
    "When you are safe at home, you wish you were having an adventure-when you're having an adventure, you wish you were safe at home"

    --Thornton Wilder

  12. #12
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    Default

    Looking back, I'm thinking this was probably best. It is a small department with only about 350 calls a year. They didn't give me an opportunity to re-locate because I guess they were going over all the applicants, and weeding out those that live too far away, and hired the ones that fit the shoe.

    The one I'm aiming for now gets around 1500 calls a year, so it will be better there for getting experience, as well as pay (I'm guessing). I've also found out that there are about 4 paid-on-call FD's within reach from the apartment I'm looking at getting. So... hopefully one of them will take me in. If not, I guess I'll just continue on with my schooling on my own, and then apply to full-time departments when the time is right.

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    Originally posted by Ratchet
    As for my goal, yes, I want to get on to a full time department. I've done a little checking, and it seems like they want you to be an EMT-B before getting on board. The POC stations around here put you through the training, so getting on board with one of them would be very beneficial.
    That's great that you plan on being a full-time firefighter some day and that joining a volunteer dept. will get you your EMT but I wouldn't mention this when applying. If they think you are just going to use them for training and then quit if and when you get a full-time FF gig, they'll shy away from you very quickly.

    Good luck in your future of this great profession. I think you'll find it definitely gets in your blood
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

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    Actually... I wasn't thinking of quiting the POC station when I go full-time. I would have no problem working for a FT station as well as a paid-on-call station.

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    I would have no problem working for a FT station as well as a paid-on-call station
    but the IAFF might.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  16. #16
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    Arrow

    Originally posted by Ratchet
    Actually... I wasn't thinking of quiting the POC station when I go full-time. I would have no problem working for a FT station as well as a paid-on-call station.
    But if you get hurt working for the POC station, will the insurance from your full-time job cover you?

    I gave up a paid-per-call spot on one department that sees some good fire to get a career spot on a department that's in a more medical run oriented area. I would love to still run calls with my old combo. department so I could fight more fire... But it's too big of a risk. I have solid disability insurance through work, but it's likely not to cover me if I'm injured with another department. And as much as I enjoy fighting fire, I'm not ready to take that risk right now.

  17. #17
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    Question

    This is probably the wrong place, but.....

    In reguards to Bones point.

    I think its a shame things are like that. My own "thoughts/ ideas" I think it would be better if the IAFF embraced vol's in a different manner. If all FF's spoke with one voice, I think more could be accomplished to improve manning #'s, safety, and convert more volunteer departments to atleast combo in areas that are "border line". I don't believe its feasible to have a paid department for a area that has a hand full of calls per year, but there are many areas that would be better served having a manned firehouse that could afford it as well.

    Just my 2 cents

  18. #18
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    Default Really?

    At a few of the stations I've talked to, they made mention of working at several departments. Maybe things are a little different around here, or maybe I misunderstood them. Either way, if I can do both, I will... if not, I guess I'll have to make that choice when the time comes.

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