1. #1
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    Default Breathing Apparatus safety line

    I am a Fire Officer From Scotland and have designed a Firefighters safety line to assist Fire crews retrace their way out of large buildings in smoke and darkness. The design has been endorsed by fire crews and will hopefully be adopted by all of the United Kingdom Fire authorities. It is simple and easy to understand and will be a great benefit to fire crews throughout the world. More information on the design is available from www.simfireandsafety.com and I would appreciate any comments or opinions on this subject.

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    From a firefighting point of view, there are two comments I would make -

    1) Having some means of determining the direction to an exit on a main guideline is an improvement on the current guidelines that we use, as long as it doesn't impeed the movement of a snaphook on a personal guideline as it is moved along the main guideline.

    2) The biggest problem with main guidelines (and probably why they are only used very reluctantly) is not with the guideline itself, but rather it is that they are very rarely deployed correctly, and hence end up entangling the very firefighters they are supposed to be helping.
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    Default Breathing Apparatus safety lines

    Thanks for your comments, firstly the standard snap hook passes over the indicator tabs with little resistence, although a lot of the United Kingdom Fire Brigades have switched to karabiner clips on their personal lines which are a big improvement.
    Fire-fighters in the UK are also reluctant to use guidelines, but if they are simpler and easier to understand, this must make them more user friendly and this point has been made by firefighters in this country who have evaluated the new design.

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    Scotfire.

    Can you PM me with contact details, I would be interested in discussing this in more depth.
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    In South Australia we have always had little metal bands on our guidelines, we have 4 metal bands, on your way in you would feel 1 then a short space then 3 more, on your way out you would feel 3 then a short space and 1. The way we remember is 13 is bad so you are going toward the fire, 31 is good so you are heading out ! I personally have never had a problem feeling them even with thick gloves on because you just feel for the sequence of bumps, but all of you are right because they are a real pain when you start getting branch lines coming off, half the times crews can't tie knots properly and you end up with a huge tangle !

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    Just a few comments: Any system which identifies the way in/out on a guide line is esstential. In NZ, we use metal ferrals on the line which consist of 4 ferrals, one of which is 150mm from the other three, which are then spaced at 20mm intervals. The point I'm trying to make is that any system must have a training package or some system that installs in to firefighters minds an easy way to remeber the way out. In our case the ferrals work in the manner that they are an arrow pointing out, or in the case of the dark humour of the Fire Service an officer & 3 FF going in which the officer last in First out :O).

    Guide lines by their very nature are difficult & clumsy to use to any system that improves them is of good value. Best of Luck

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    The problems that we have in the UK seems to be the same the world over as we have trouble in tying off the guideline and also difficulty in denoting the correct direction of travel to the exit.

    What if there was an emergency escape line fitted, in large or complicated buildings that allowed the occupants to find there way out to an exit, even in total darkness, and also could be utilised by fire crews to find and extinguish the fire quicker and safer, which should result in less fire damage and less insurance claims.
    The SIMLINE is simple, and so easy to understand that even my 6 year old boy can use it.
    We firefighters need something simple and easy to understand, especially when our lives may depend on it and if it works for us, why not use it to evacuate the premises, prior to our arrival.
    Again, I would appreciate the comments and views of fellow Firefighters on these points.

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