1. #1
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    Question Hurst manifold block

    Anybody that uses a manifold block with their Hurst system:

    How much does it slow down operation of the tool?

    Do you leave it hooked up all the time, or only use it when you know you'll need more than one tool?

    How long are the hoses between the manifold and the tools?

    Any other bits of info you can offer?

    Thanks!
    TW
    Essex Junction Fire Dept.
    Vermont

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    Dont do it! There are better thing out now you dont need a manifold.
    When you hook up to it,it is pressure on demand. The stronger more dominant tool wins every time. Use as a last resort. The hoses are 16' most of the time. coming from a 30' section.

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    We have had ours preconnected on a 75' reel for the last 12 years at least. The hoses from the block to the tools are from 10' - 20'. Difference operating 1 tool with and without block has been neglible(sp?). Using more than 1 tool at a time slows down all the tools. We did find, and confirmed through our local rep, the rams need to be the last tool on the block. 99% of the time we are only using 1 tool at a time, but it's nice not having to disconnect/connect the tools during a call. We hook up 3 tools and are ready to go.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    We use this block also. You must make sure that the supply hose comes into the block at the right connection. The block is numbered 1 thru 3 in large letters with the power in connection lettered in smaller type. It is a natural inclination for the firefighters to connect to the #1 connection. This will cause the tool to operate very slowly without a load and will not work under load. The hydraulic fluid may eat the stickers off also.
    We have this preconnected to our second line on a dual pump setup. We do not use two tools at the same time off one line, the block is there to allow us to cut in a third tool without having to disconnect any thing thus saving us time(in theory).
    Just make sure the firefighters train often with so they are comfortable with it.

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    My department ran with the HURST manifold and a single power plant for years. The HURST rep. also told us that the manifolds with the dump valve have more flow restriction than one without the dump valve. When we speced out our new rescue we made sure that the most tools where preconnected on their own reel, we have 4 reels, 3 with single tools preconnected. The third has the manifold block preconnected and we use that for connecting the rams. We have noticed a big diffrence in the tools as far as power and speed.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by cutitout
    Dont do it! There are better thing out now you dont need a manifold.
    cutitout- What are some of the better things that I can look into? While I'd love to be able to operate more than one tool at a time, that sounds to me like "new power unit", which I'm not able to pursue at this time. I was looking at the manifold block so at least we could switch from one tool to another without having to shut down and disconnect/reconnect.
    TW
    Essex Junction Fire Dept.
    Vermont

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    The MTM was not designed to "operate" more than one tool at a time. It was designed, however, to allow up to three tools being connected to a power supply. This was to speed up operations by not having to connect and disconnect tools as required.

    There were many of those items sold under the premise that it would allow more than one tool operation. If you understood the principal of a series connection... that is all a MTM is... a series connector. Some have dumps and some don't. Keep in moind that it is only a piece of steel / aluminum... if you try to out-think it... you will most likely loose.

    One of my biggest training issues as a dealer is the MTM. I have 2 that are cut aways to "show" what happens in operation.

    Information only... if you are using a tool on #1... and someone else wants to use a tool on #2... the only way the #2 tool moves is by the fluid being displaced from tool #1...

    Let me know if I can answer any additional questions.

  8. #8
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    Smile Hurst manifold block

    I am the past Director of our access team. We purchased a used set of Hurst tools that came with a model 32B, a JL150 cutter, a gas power unit, 1 16' hose, 2 30' hoses and a distribition block. There is no loss of power by using the distribution block but you do loose some performance if you are using two tools at the same time. Many times this is no problem unless you need maximum power for each tool. We have since that time purchased a combination tool and several rams for our team.We have the power unit attached to the block with a 16' hose and depending upon our sizeup we usually hook up the combination tool and the cutter upon arrival with 30' hoses. We also have the 32B hooked up to a 30' hose as well and can hook that up to the block if necessary. The more connections you can eliminate in the field in times of emergency and stress the better off you will be. You do have to be careful to hook up the hoses in the correct order, on the distribution block. The decal does get eaten up by fluid spilling on it an you have to hook the hose from the power unit up to the correct connection. By having the power unit at least 16' from the dist. block and having someone right there with the power unit it keeps any chance of ignition of flamable substances down as well as if a hose breaks someone can shut down the flow of fluid quickly. I hope this has been some help to you. LT. Scot Sabins

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    The block is a waste of money. You can hook up the hoses to do the same thing.

    With the new pumps you can use two tools at the same time, don't buy a block.

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    I wish that I had read ADSNWFLD's reply before we bought one of the worthless pieces of junk. We have used Hurst tools since 79 & are getting ready to order a Hurst Trimo pump, 2 telescoping rams, and a Maverick Combi tool. I'd like for Hurst's manifold inventor to (well never mind)!

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by TWEJFD


    cutitout- What are some of the better things that I can look into? While I'd love to be able to operate more than one tool at a time, that sounds to me like "new power unit", which I'm not able to pursue at this time. I was looking at the manifold block so at least we could switch from one tool to another without having to shut down and disconnect/reconnect.
    Does HURST have a transfere valve like Phoenix has on many of their power units? That would be the way I would go if that is an option. You have both tools connected and switch from one tool to the other with a switch of a lever. You get 100% operation from the tools this way. The drawback is that you need to commit a person to control that valve so that you can switch quickly when you need to.

    Get that, and then save your $$$ to buy a true simo pump.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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