1. #1
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    Question Tubular Webbing With Carabiners

    I've read quite a few posts here of people carying anywhere from 12 feet to 100 feet of some kind of tubular webbing and 2-4 beeners.

    What all can you do with this webbing, what is the "best" width (I've seen it range from 1/2 inch to 3 inches) and in realaty how long is long enough???

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    I carry 20 ft of 1in tubular webbing with a beener. It can be used for many things. RIT, self rescue, victim removal. You could use it as a simple 2:1 to remove a victim or FF from a small hole or collapse. You can make a number of harnasses out of it. If you needed to get out a 2nd story window or higher, you could loop it around a tool and hang it out of the window and use it to get lower to the ground before jumping. It can be used to extend a search, have one guy stay on the wall holding one end of the webbing while you go out and search.

    These are just a few use, there are many more. All these uses and many of the other things you can do with webbing are not easy. It takes alot of practice and expirence to use the webbing properly in any of these situations. As with any tool or job in the fire service, make sure you fully understand what you are using and how to use it. You need to know what the tensile strength of the webbing is. Can it withstand a two person load. The condition of the webbing needs to be checked often.

    Stay Safe.
    B Holmes

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    Buy yourself some webbing, at least 1" in width, and then just take it to training and start working with it. It is a personal choice how long you want your webbing and what type of operations your department is "typically" involved in. In our county we do not have any high rise buildings (only in the city) so we are not likely to need ours to escape down several floors of a building, so a long line is not as necessary. However, we have a lot of trailers and one story buildings and having around 10' seems to work very well. It is enough to search a room with if you have to leave a partner at the door while you look, can be used to help carry a victim, or tie the ladder off atop a roof or window. I have found if you place a caribeaner on each end of the webbing it is easy to wrap it around the victim and clip it to itself or to part of the scba straps if it is a firefighter. This saves trying to tie a knot in gloves under deteriorating conditions. Just take some webbing and some beaners and practice for what works best for you. Do make sure you buy legitimate beaners, the clip on keychain versions sold widely at walmart and hardware stores are NOT load bearing devices. Also, have some webbing used for odd jobs like tying off ladders, and have one set designated for rescues only. The webbing will deteriorate when readily exposed to the heat and chemicals encountered in routine firefighting. The webbing is relatively inexpensive, so replace it whenever you even suspect it may be degrating and especially if it has been exposed to any heat. Yourequipment is only as good as the care and knowledge you put into it. Good luck!

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    I have the normal flat webbing and the round climbing rope that I carry. On the rope I have a beener at each end. It is a great tool for everything on the fireground and anywhere else.

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    Everyone has already mentioned using tubular webbing for various rescue purposes. I use it more for utility reasons. You can hitch it around a 2.5" handline and loop it over your shoulder to help control the line with less fatigue. I often use it to tie back a door when using PPV, to keep the door from blowing shut. Tying off ladders and hoisting equipment have already been mentioned. It can be used in extrication to tie back a flapped roof or a popped door. I prefer the webbing to rope because it lays flatter and takes up less space in your turnout pocket.

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    Post Webbing

    I have found that using 12' of 1" tubular webbing works great. I bought 12'6" of webbing and tied to water knots (on a bight) in the ends. I then clipped two biners through each. I found it long enough to use on searches, as a sling for carrying saws to the roof (not running, I must add the safety factor) and as a potential sling for bail out (luckily I haven't had to do this).

    To make the bail out sling I clipped the two biners together to form a loop. Hold the loop behind you, reach back through your legs and grab the webbing. Then grab the webbing on both sides of your waist. This should form a sling that cradles your back and each leg. Just clip one biner to the three loops in front of you. This is a pretty good makeshift sling (our new turnouts are coming soon with harnesses).

    Just my two cents worth.
    Jonathan Martin
    martinj@wpi.edu
    WPI Mechanical Engineering
    "Be safe, use smoke detectors...be safer, sleep with a firefighter..."

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    My Dept (Kettering Fire Ohio) actually issues us a 6foot piece of 1" webbing with a biner. The biner is clipped to a small loop in one end and there is a loop in the other end big enough to pass the biner through. We call them hose straps but they work great for lots of things. Since we all have them they can be clipped together for a big room search, they can tie off a ladder, they can loop around a person for pulling or lowering.
    I personally have that and then also 40' of 7mm rope. I try to keep the rope nice and clean and safe for life rescue purposes, but sometimes its needed for a utility rope. Then it gets replaced and for a while I'll actually have 2 40' ropes with me. The good rope is kept in a pocket inside the 'tails' of my bunker coat.

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    Smile Me Too!.....

    Add me to the long list of those who carry a 20' piece of tubular webbing and 2 locking 'bieners. There are more uses for this combo than you can think of. The best thing to do is get some and experiment with it. Try anything that comes to mind at least once. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

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    Thanks for the ideas, going to grab a 20 foot chunk of the webbing & have a hoop sown into each end for a biner or two.

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    Make sure that witht he rope you untie the knots once or twice a year to clean them and retye them. You must maitain rope and webing like any other peace of gear.

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    Red face Sew What??

    Originally posted by Shrike9
    Thanks for the ideas, going to grab a 20 foot chunk of the webbing & have a hoop sown into each end for a biner or two.
    If you are going to do ANYTHING that alters the webbing from it's "as purchased" condition, get some advice from people who know the gear and it's limitations. You could, by sewing, weaken the webbing and not realize it. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

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    If you are going to use the webbing in life safety applications, you must be careful about what you buy. There is webbing on the market that looks like tubular, but is not. Check to make sure you are not buying webbing that is folded and stitched and merely looks like it is tubular. The folded and stitched variety is junk.

    I carry 20 feet of tubular webbing for search and rescue with two hand loops pre tied at the ends. Saves time that way when you don't have it to waste. I also carry another 20 feet to use as utility line.

    If you are going to use the webbing as an anchor, be sure you know how to tie the water knot, and make certain the webbing used in the anchor is at least 2 inch tubular. Carabiner's are nice, I carry 2. Make sure they are the locking type.

    Webbing has it's uses, but for get out of dodge fast line, I carry 40 feet of 1/2 inch static kernmantle. A little bulky, but I can get my gloves on it even when they are wet and not slip. Try doing that with webbing. The stuff is light weight and I roll it up and put the stuff in left bunker bellows pocket. Takes almost no room that way.

    It has it's uses, but carry rope too.

    Just one mans opinion
    If you can keep your head about you, while those around you are losing theirs, then you will be a man my son.

    Rudyard Kipling.

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    Lightbulb

    Put me on the list of those who carry a 20' peice of webbing with a beener.Want an idea on smoething else? How about a golf ball? Great way to vent a second floor window or if you lose your sence of direction, roll it on the floor and listen.

    stay safe

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    Jack,
    I don't know what kind of windows you got down there in the south, but if I threw a golf ball at a double pain thermal window like most houses around here have, I would probably get hit in the head as the ball shot back at me! I like the idea about sliding thing on the floor(if it is not a rug). If lost you could use anything you find or have. I have used my folding spanner wrench in a drill to find a wall. Another idea, if you are on a cement floor find an expansion joint and follow it to a wall. If on a wood floor feel for or look for the directions the board are laid, follow them to the wall. Just a few tips.

    Stay Safe
    B Holmes

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    Gotta love some of these replies! I've learned more "tricks of the trade" reading these forums than in almost two decades of jobbing. No I'm not being sarcastic either!. A simple question about 1000lb (my nickname for webbing), and all of a sudden we learn about new uses for golfballs. These forums are great aren't they Keep the ideas flowing guys...

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    Add me to the list. I carry a 15' section of 2" tubular webbing, 2 locking biners, & a 25' section of 1/2" kernmantle. Typically I use the webbing for carrying tools, victim/firefighter retrieval, and possibly tied or wrapped around something in a room if I have to go out a window (that's what the 1/2" kermantle is for, and I wear a "rescue belt" as my standard duty belt). I can also use the 1/2" kermantle for searches (particularly in highrises and large open spaces).
    IAFF 995
    When it has to be done right,
    CALL THE RESCUE CO.!!!!!

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