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  1. #1
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    Smile Which coupling to follow

    I've read articles on which coupling to follow out of a bldg one says follow the follow the female and than another will say to follow the male!!!It seems to me that you would follow the male coupling out.Any Feed back.Thanks Stay safe Out There


  2. #2
    Forum Member SCOOBY14B's Avatar
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    I guess it depends on your translation of "following". The MALE coupling is pointing toward the truck and that is the way you wanna go.

  3. #3
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    OK, your lost in a building and find a hoseline and follow it until you find brass. Which way are you going?

    If the first thing your hand hits are long lugs then your hand is on the male end of the hose, and continuing will bring you to the hose team.
    If you hit a smooth collar then short lugs you are on the female end and pointed out.

    You need to practice this with a gloved hand not using your vision until it is second nature, because it could make the difference in you making it out.

    Just remember your hand needs to be touching lugs then hose to be pointed out (worded different if it is easier to remember).

    Practice, practice, practice.

  4. #4
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Threaded discharges on most apparatus have a male fitting. Therefore, to connect a hose, the female end of the hose coupling gets connected to the male end. Following this logic, male ends point towards fire, female ends point towards engines.

    The male side of a coupling has larger tabs than the female side. If you have a coupling in your hand, feel for the larger tabs and go that way as the large tabs on the male end will be the further end of hose away from the engine.

    This is not always true, but will be close to 99% of the time.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  5. #5
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    Here's how I train my guys.

    Straddle the hose. Find a coupling. In one hand, place the smooth part of the coupling. With the other hand, find the lugs. The direction of the lugs from the hand on the smooth part is the direction that leads you out of the fire. Now that you've found it, face in the direction you want to go while still straddling the hose. Slide your hand along the hose while you haul *ss.

    Great training aid: take an out of service hose, connect the couplings, and cut the hose off a few inches from each coupling. Now you have a 9-12 inch long training aid that you can hand to a FF, have them close their eyes, feel the couplings with gloved hands, and tell you the way out.

  6. #6
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Direction of travel
    Occasionally, it is necessary for fireground personnel to follow hoselines out of a structure. Therefore, it is imperative that personnel practice and become familiar with the concept of following a hoseline and develop the ability to determine the proper direction of travel with only their hands as a reference point as follows:

    Assume a nozzle is connected to a male coupling. Therefore, when considering any coupling (behind a nozzle attached to a male coupling), following the hose behind male couplings will lead toward the pump (outside the structure) and following the hose behind female couplings will lead toward the nozzle (into the structure). With practice, it is easy to distinguish between a male and female coupling by feel only. The lug on a female coupling is
    one-third to one-half the length as compared with the length of a lug on a male coupling. With this knowledge, any firefighter can grasp a coupling on a hoseline and quickly determine which direction will lead to a desired location as follows (forward lay):

    To reach the exterior of a building, follow the hose behind the male coupling.
    To reach the nozzle, follow the hose behind the female coupling.
    Last edited by E40FDNYL35; 01-30-2003 at 04:53 PM.
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  7. #7
    Forum Member Lewiston2FF's Avatar
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    Not very PC but I was taught to remember this way. "The female goes to the truck" meaning the female connection goes to the apparatus. Using the female coupling like an arrow it points the way to go.
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

  8. #8
    iceman4442
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    Amazing timing on this thread! We did SCBA refresher training yesterday, and one of the questions on our pre & post test had to do with which coupling was closer to the exit.

    We had massive arguments over the wording of the question, as some argued that they were holding the hose, and the female coupler would be closer to the exit, while the ones who got it right assumed they found brass and that the male coupleing was closer to the exit.

    Next week, it will be back in a test, but I'm prevnting any "semantics" arguments, as it will be with a charged hose, a blacked out mask, and gloves on. They'll have to go the right way once they find the brass, which is the important thing.

  9. #9
    Forum Member ThNozzleman's Avatar
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    You should follow the males if you want out...it will take you to the last male, the discharge on the engine. Following the females will bring you to the last female...the nozzle.

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