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Thread: tools

  1. #1
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    Default tools

    I know that tools are needed for fire fighting. (ha ha ha) However, I would like to know preferences for which tools people like to grab off the rig when going into house fires, being first in, second rig in, etc. There has been much discussion on tool selection lately. Please give me your preferences....
    (I know this is a broad subject...but a little input from ya'll is much appreciated)
    Thanks


  2. #2
    Forum Member PenguinMedic's Avatar
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    Cool

    I like to take the Irons in with me. You can do just about anything with them, IF you know how.

    The problem I have found is when folks do bring tools inside with them, they don't know how to use them the right way. It seems that proper tool use has become another "lost art" in the fire service today. How many guys have you seen walk into the middle of a room and pull a ceiling straight down onto their heads! Forget asking most guys to pop a door, all I see now is the "SWAT foot kick", or beating the hell out of it with a maul.

    "K-Tool, what the heck is that?" (I almost hit the guy who said that one)

    Half the battle is to make sure your guys get off the rigs with tools, the other half is training them how to use them.

    Stay safe out there,
    John

  3. #3
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    Default

    I would have to go with a good halligan and an 8lb maul.
    Learn to use the tools that you have. If you have to you can force a door with a long pry bar with almost as much success as better tools.
    Learn to use each tool to its fullest and you'll be a better firefighter.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber CFD Hazards's Avatar
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    Default Engine or Truck?

    It depends what you are riding and how your department handles calls. In many cities, the truck companies are responsible for Forcible Entry and searching for the fire. Engines stretch lines and extinguish the fire. In other cities, pieces are not well manned and the engine may be responsible for FE and extinguishment. I personally like the Halligan. With it, you can force doors, breach walls, pull low ceilings, use it as an achor in an emergency and a host of other things.
    The thing that bothers me the most is when a person goes in with nothing and then asks to borrow your tool. I ask them what they need it for and then do it myself. Never give up your tool.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Even though different fires offer different situations, I prefer to take a halligan and a 6ft. hook especially on a house fire. With the halligan you can force doors, take out windows and window frames,open up walls, shut off gas meters just to name a few.

  6. #6
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    Default

    How about the flashlight, TIC and a hook.

  7. #7
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    Cool

    In our small town we don't have a "truck" so the first in pumper has to do both forced entry and attack. I like to take a halligan tool, axe, and a flashlight with our attack crew.

    _____
    Gone, But Not Forgotten - Our Fallen

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    Default

    Maybe you will think its a dumb question but a lot of you guys talked about breaching a wall with a halligan...
    im new and im not really sure how you would do that (which side what you would hit etc.) although im suree it can be done lol
    anyone care to explain? thanks a lot

  9. #9
    Forum Member PenguinMedic's Avatar
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    Smile Wall breach

    That is a good question Dan, there is nothing wrong with asking questions.

    The most likely need for a wall breach is self-rescue. You are trapped in one room, and want to get into the one next to it. Most houses use fairly thin layers of Sheetrock for interior walls, so you don't need much force to punch through them.

    I like to hold the Halligan by the shaft, and punch the flat part of the head end straight in. The head, adz, and pike will make a huge hole. You then rip back and forth to enlarge the hole. You don't need to do too much, just one bay between the studs. Do a reduced profile drill with your pack, and slip through. If you lost your tool, and it was a dire emergency like an impending flashover, you can turn your back to the wall and use your bottle as a ram. BE ADVISED, you can cause grave damage to your pack doing this. It is a "Last resort" deal.

    All firefighters should drill on self-rescuce so that it is automatic. Air pack emergencies, Reduced profile/Quick escape, and disorientation drills save lives.

    Stay safe,
    John

  10. #10
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    Smile

    Dan,

    I totally agree with Penguin on self-rescue. Here is another idea if your just searching for extension or overhaul.


    Even though it doesn't have the weight of an axe, you can use the adze end of a halligan bar to tear out walls. Works really well on drywall and plaster. Swing the halligan bar like you would an axe. When the adze enters the wall, pull it towards you. With the adze end on most halligan type bars being 2 to 3 inches wide you should be able to pull out fairly large pieces of the wall. Just remember to look behind you before you swing the thing!
    This is just one way i like to use it. It's not rocket science. Experiment a little. Find an old house that's going to be demolished and get permission to train on it. Build a false wall at the station to train on. This can be done pretty inexpensively. Hardware stores and home centers always have damaged pieces of drywall or paneling laying around. Usually they will sell them to you for next to nothing and some will even give them to you.

    Hope this helps
    Last edited by mallethead; 02-15-2003 at 12:36 AM.

  11. #11
    Forum Member dfd3dfd3's Avatar
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    Default

    To open a wall up the easiest and quickest with a halligan or an axe is to punch a hole in the wall then lower the tool inside the bay while u keep a hold to the end when u have lowered the tool as far down as it will go then pull back on the tool and you will have opened up the whole bay the length of your tool in one movement.

  12. #12
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    Default

    I prefer the nozzle

    But if I can't snatch that away from somebody, I take the irons or a 6' hook.
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

  13. #13
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    Default

    Axe...or...halligan. The halligan has the advantage of doing more things with one tool, but if it is possible the best thing is take both of them. An axe is really good for "swinging" your way out, but the halligan can be a "push and pull" type of tool. I personally like to take both in if I am on the attack crew.

  14. #14
    Forum Member RyanEMVFD's Avatar
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    Default

    along with checking for the stud first, pray that IC has the power turned off also.

    Halligan all the way, then the axe.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
    IACOJ Attack

    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

  15. #15
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    Default

    Anyone of these: Halligan, Providence hook, Boston rake, or NY multi hook.
    "I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

    Edward F. Croker
    Chief 1899-1911
    Fire Dept. City of New York

    HOOK N' CAN of the I.A.C.O.J.

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber ff7134's Avatar
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    Default Tools

    First choice is the "Irons" then I like our "Closet hook" which
    is a pike pole that broke and was cut down to about 3foot long.

    But mainly for us it depends on your postion on the line to waht you carry. Nozzleman-small hand axe, 2nd man-Irons, 3rd(OIC)TIC.

    It also depends on what you are comfortable with. When in doubt take a Halligan. And if you are asked to get something to "pop" a car hood, Don't get a crow bar.....get the halligan.

  17. #17
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    Thumbs up Tools

    Dan,
    Try this, use the pry end of the Halligan to punch through a dry-wall or sheetrock wall at eye level as you're kneeling on the floor. Use it to probe around the opposite side for obstacles like dressers, refrigerators, etc. then pull it back and slide the pry end down into the wall and "ratchet" it down the wall. This will open the entire stud gap with one motion, you'll also need to kick the other side out. You can use the other end as a sledge hammer to beat the bottom of the stud over to enlarge the stud gap from about 15 inches to almost 30 or so. You can do this in less that 30 seconds.
    Joe Matesa
    Olive Fire District
    Fightin' Company 2

  18. #18
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    Default

    Watch for electrical wiring, dude. 120 A/C running through the haligan bar isn't fun when it hits your wet gloves. Trust me.

  19. #19
    Forum Member Fire304's Avatar
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    Well, lets see,

    Depends on my assignment, but usually...
    Attack-Halligan, TIC
    Vent-Flat head axe (yes flat head, the flat goes through a roof much faster than the cutting side), TIC if available
    Search-Halligan (partner has flat head axe) or short Boston rake and TIC
    Overhaul- Rake or pick head axe, TIC

    Always- at least 2 lights, a spanner, 4 wedges, shingler's hammer (pocket axe), ladder belt, 50' bail out rope and biners, and a radio

    While my current FD does not have them, if we did I'd carry a TNT on all the above except venting. I love that tool (I'm also 6'7" and 280lbs so I can carry it)

  20. #20
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    When I first got in my company, we had loads of 3' & 6' long hooks and other weird headed tools. In time we were learning the downfalls of these tool lengths.... too short / too long. We then ordered some replacement tools at 4' and depending on the task it was being used for it works out to being just right.

    We have also ordered these tools with either.... "D" handles on the end, multiple heads (one on each end of the tool), or with gas shut offs on the end. Adds to the versatility of the tool.

    Breaching walls, try this ..... in leiu of a tool:

    Find your spot, take a 3-point football stance (both hands down, and one foot planted along the floorboard). Then, begin "mule kicking" the wall with the other leg, using the sole of your foot.
    *** OR ***
    Take a seated position on the floor close to the wall. Get both feet together, anchor your body with your arms / hands planted and begin kicking away (again, with the soles of your feet). This should create an area opening large enough to fit through. You should also be able to kick free a stud or two at the floor level, to be able to get yourself through as well.

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