1. #1
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    Question Rescue Equipment Question

    We are a rural all volunteer department that is looking at beginning to build rescue capability. Our basic rescue is Motor Vehicle Accident extrication or Farm accident extrication. We currently have no rescue equipment. What would you consider a basic list of rescue equipment to include? Jaws of Life, GlassMaster Tool, Cribbing, etc. We would be required to keep costs as low as possible but meet the communities' need for rescue. If you had to make the list, what would you include and why? Any information greatly appreciated. Asked the question in the extrication forum also, but wanted to see if their was a different perspective from other volunteer departments.
    Thanks
    Malcolm Cunningham
    Fire Chief - Hardin FPD
    Hardin, MO

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    I just went to your post in extrication. Lots of good ideas there. Jaws, cribbing, etc...
    My best input would be that once you've gotten your gear go out and use it a lot to really get to know how it all works together. We have the opportunity to go to an auto graveyard twice a year and tear apart a couple of cars generously donated by the yard owner. We set up a scenario and roll up hot and go to it. Lots of fun and keeps people sharp.

  3. #3
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    Since your in a rural department and farm equipment is heavy duty, jaws would me a must. One of the best tools that I have found though is a simply, gas powered, recipricating saw. They word great for cutting roof posts. Jaws are needed for the heavy duty stuff but you can take doors off by simply getting into the hinge with a halegan tool and prying. as long as its not hard casened steel. which the bolts that hold doors on usually are not. Ropes, Cribbing, glass cutters are also handy

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    As said already cribbing is a must, does your dept. need big spreaders if not what about a combi-tool, may save money right now. We use 24 volt cordless saw-zalls work great for us. ram?, chains, more cribbing air bags check out res-q techs tools and airbags we are ordering some now. Air chisel work well on metal silos and large panels on vans and suv's. PTO shaft what are you going to use to cut, a , i think it's called and exothermic cutting torch, works well doesn't get the metal hot right away uses oxygen and vehicle battery. Hope this helps some.

  5. #5
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    I'm in a fairly rural department, and know for a fact that just because most departments base their equipment needs upon population, doesn't mean that large incidents won't happen. You should have at least some sort of equipment to use for rapid extrication. We have about 30 MVA's a year, which isn't very many, but they are usually bad. People speeding along the back country roads hit another person doing the same thing head on at a corner where they say what's the chances there's another car coming?... Know what I mean, Vern? sure ya do.

    We have a squad-rescue truck equipped as a rescue first and a pumper second. It's outfitted with A Hydraulic/Motor powered HURST Tool w/ Spreader and cutter tools and Three hydraulic Ram tools. An electric HURST Tool w/ Combination Cutter/Spreader. (To work on two vehicles at a time, or two sides of a vehicle. Full compliment of Air bags, Air chisel kit, Railroad jacks, 4 & 10 Ton Jacks, Porto-Power Kit for farm rescue, k-12 Saw, 3 SAWZALL Kits (2 battery, 1 electric), Chain saw, Various hand tools-Brooms and shovels, Tool kit, HazMat spill containment kit (PIG Kit), Trauma Kit, FoamPak, Blitzfire preconnected deluge gun, Foam inductor nozzles, On board Cascade system, 8 SCBA units, GPS for Landing Zones, High Angle gear, 60" Positive Pressure fan on wheels, Floor piercing nozzle, 1,500' 5" LDH, 300' 3" Attack lines, 400' 1 3/4" Attack Lines all hand (Attack lines) have TFT Pistol Grip nozzles, Various amounts of Cribbing, Ground and roof ladder, Back board, Generator.

    Our Brush truck is equipped to assist with any additional accidents we have if the rescue truck is out. With extra cribbing for big accidents, SAWZALL tool, and ropes. All Ambulances are equipped with SAWZALL tools, and electric Chain saws to back up in case they are needed.

    --------------------------------------------------------------

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    Our rescue unit includes:

    Jaws of Life:cutters and spreaders

    Porta Power Pack(which is a hand hydrolic pump which has many little attachments that can be used for rolling dashed, raising the vehicle, ect.)

    Cribbing

    Backboards

    headblocks

    halogan tool

    glassmaster

    ropes

    floodlights

    ace

    pry bars

    flashlights: Streamlight lightbox's

    extension cords

    scoop strecher

    splints

    C-colars

    Various Trama supplies

    oxygen/airway supplies

    traffic controll tools

    AED
    Matt

    LIEUTENANT
    Covington Fire/Rescue, Texas

    U.S.A.F Reserve Firefighter

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    Default Re:Equipment

    I am with a mostly rural department but we have an interstate and major highway in out response area. Our department had the first set of (jaws) in the area so we had alot of time to practice our skills by responding to mutual aid calls from other departments. We bought a set of Halmatro tools in 1991 and they are still being used today.We have a gas powered power unit and 2 reels with 50' of hose on each. We have a set of jaws , a cutter, 1 long ram and 1 short ram.
    Set of 4 step chocks and numerous pieces of 4x4 cribbing. We also have 4 6' 4x4's for stabilizing vehicles on their sides. we have 2 Glassmaster windshield saws (rarely used due to airdorne shards).If you have the room another set of 4 steps chocks would come in handy as you usually have 2 vehicles involved most of the time. Hope this list helps out in some way



    chris Poulson

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    I highly recommend the DeWalt 24v Reciprocating saw. It comes with two batteries, a charger, and a "battery adaptor" to run the saw off AC. We've always had the Milwakee Sawzalls and we decided to try the DeWalt. Holy hell, it blew the Sawzalls out of the water. The power and torque that DeWalt has incredible! It makes VERY fast work of anything you try and cut, especially the A/B/C posts. It zips right through them, often much simpler than the Hurst cutters. Once the two batteries are dead (and they last a while), you just clip the AC Adaptor on it and bang, keep going.

    Besides the DeWalt... hydrolic spreaders, cutters, and a combo tool are great. Just keep in mind the capacity of the pump. With ours, we have a manifold that will allow us to connect three hydrolic tools at once. Thats great and all except the pump can't handle it. If you try and operate two tools at once, they both just sit there because it can't produce enough pressure to run both at once. It is nice to have 3 pre-connected but you just can't use them all at once. You need to have a pump capacity to meet your needs otherwise you might end up screwing yourself when you plan on running more the one at once.

    Cribbing... Thats easy. All you need is some cheap lumber and a saw. Start cutting. Get a ton of 2x4's, stack them, and cut them to about 2 or 2.5 feet long. Some 4x4 and 6x6 pieces are nice too.

    The plastic step-chocks are great but you don't NEED them. You can do with cribbing anything you can do with the Step Chocks.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    If you are just getting started and money is tight go with a good sawzall and a good set of tools. Farm machinery is tough and you may have better luck dismantaling it instead of ripping it apart.

    otherwise the other post will point you in the right direction

  10. #10
    55 Years & Still Rolling
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    Thumbs up YEAH! What He Said!

    A Good Set Of Tools! If you put a Hurst Tool up against my John Deere, your tool will lose. Period. Railroad cars/engines Etc. laugh at auto extracation equipment. Not Knowing how much you wish to spend, I'll go on the assumption that money is tight, after all, you said rural...... WOOD - cribbing, wedges, stepchocks, jack pads, etc. ARE FREE!! We have cribbing in 2x4, 4x4, 6x6, Stepchocks are a piece of 2x10 on the bottom, then 4 pieces of 2x6, going up in progressively shorter sections. Jack pads are 24x24 plywood, with enough layers screwed together so the pad is 1.5 to 2 inches thick. Pieces of 4x4, cut 4, 5, and 6 feet long are used as struts for stabilization. Wedges are simply cut fron regular pieces of cribbing material. Always have multipal sizes. We carry several HUNDRED pieces of wood between all of our vehicles, and I have never spent a single penny for it. It all came donated by builders, contractors, etc. Each section has a webbing handle, again free stuff. We cut all the seat belt material out of all the cars that we practice on, and use that for webbing. That's it for Wood, I'll post later on tools. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

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    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

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    Lots of very good suggestions here. If you choose to buy a reciprocating saw, battery or electric, be sure to get heavy duty demolition blades. Regular light weight blades break easily when cutting up cars. You may also want to consider a brake pedal cutter.(sometimes called a rabbit tool)

    It was mentioned in an earlier post but bears repeating.... practice, practice, practice.

    ~R

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    Exclamation

    You might want to consider a set of high pressure air bags. Larger ones will lift heavy farm equipment on soft ground, and small ones will spread the snap-rollers on a corn picker. The cost is fairly high, but, perhaps some financial help from the community could be found. Good luck with your project.
    Be Safe
    GOD BLESS the U.S.A. and FDNY
    Dan

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    I'm amazed that no-one suggested a Hi-lift jack. A Hi-lift jack can be one of the most useful and inexpensive extrication tools a department can have.
    You can lift a car or equipment, roll a dash or remove a door. It is only really limited by your imagination.
    If I was to equip a truck on a limited budget that would be one of the first items I would purchase.
    Some other items to look at:
    Assorted hand tools, sockets ratchets and hand wrenches
    Saws and blades...hack saws and sawsalls
    Cribbing, cribbing and more cribbing and don't forget if you think you have enough, make more.....look at 6x6 and 8x8 sections also.
    Also, find a good wrecker driver! I have used wreckers on extrications for vehicle stabilization and actual lifting. A good wrecker driver is worth his weight in gold.
    Last edited by Vollie4life; 04-06-2003 at 12:56 PM.

  14. #14
    55 Years & Still Rolling
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    Smile Got a Junkyard Around?.........

    An old auto junkyard is a goldmine for tools and other goodies. Get a couple of old (1960s-70s) "Bumper jacks", weld the bases on and replace the "Tire iron" handle with a heavier (longer) steel rod. A couple of drive shafts from old, large, long, heavy, american station wagons will make good stablization struts after a few minor modifications. Take a short (18-24in) spring leaf, sharpen one edge, weld a piece of flat scrap to the other edge at a right angle and you have a Body Knife. I'll be back with more.... Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

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