Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    88

    Default Training question

    I would like to hear from volunteers that have put training scenarios together for their departments.

    How did you get started?

    What type of scenarios did you do?

    Class room training before the scenario?

    I would also like to hear from volunteers, to get some ideas on how to get people motivated to train, and stay motivated.

    What have you, or your department done to be succesfull in training?

    Thanks in advance


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    53

    Default

    The scenarios in our department usually consist of water shuttles, interior searches, and scene management/command. We situate one pumper at a water supply, a pumper at our "scene" (usually our firehall), a tanker to shuttle the water, and of course our rescue for man-power/fire command. We set up situations where the firefighters would have to advance hoselines, extinguish mock fires (no water of course), do searches, recover victims, etc. Most of the truck operators are trainess, it's a good time for them to learn how to operate the pumps etc. We also set up our command strusture as we would on an actual scene, (interior, exterior, Fire Command, Safety Officer, etc). things usually run pretty smoothly during the exercise. After the scenario is over we meet and discuss any problems, changes, etc that we need to do/correct.
    Before doing these scenarios we will spend many training nights going over the practical and theroy on all basic firefighting operations. Then we do the scenario to see where we exel and where we need work.
    We also belong to an Association consisting of 11 fire depts. in total. once or twice a year we all get toghter for a huge, 1 day, training scenario. At these we usually have tanker shuttles, pumper relays, search patterns, SBCA training, rescue drags and carries, and on and on and on. Whatever we can think of to work into the training we do it. these trainings can consist of 50 - 100 firefighters and 15 - 20 apparatus. Each department is asked to bring something specific, (ie" pumper, rescue, ladder, snorkel etc). This way everyone doesn't show up with a pumper and have no rescues or tankers. we've also involved outside angencies in these big scenrios, (ie" paramedics, police, etc).

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Bondurant , Iowa 50035
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: training.

    I am the assistant chief of a small volunteer department and we have discovered that being a small department the attention span seems to stretch out if you will. We have started bringing in instructors from our neighboring departments to keep the attention span up . We do most of our classroom training first then move to hands on. I have personally noticed an increase in the quality of training we recieve. Hope this helps out at all.



    Chris

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    301

    Default

    I belong to a department that once struggled with this issue in the past. Training was not organized, not planned or very well executed. We started with the basics....documentation. We first needed to know who had what training and what was needed to bring everyone up to speed. Once this was completed, All line officers, including myself completed an ITCO (instructional techniques for company officers) course from the state. We then laid out our training schedule....EMS refreshers and classroom topics are covered in the fall/winter months, OSHA/NFPA and State required courses and or inspections (gear, medical checks etc..) are done every January, and all outside topics are covered in spring/summer.

    Every drill is planned with a clear objective to achieve, members are briefed prior to every drill, and a review is conducted after every drill. Regardless of the scenerio.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Seward Nebraska
    Posts
    1

    Default

    There are tons of resources out there to help you plan your training and get great ideas. One of the best resources we use is firehouse.com and the training Ideas. Firehouse also provides meny links to web sites where you can download drills.

    You need to have a clearly stated objective,
    predrill briefing,
    follow a written plan,
    and perform a debriefing.

    Following these steps you will be able to stay focused on what it is you want to do. Prepair your members for the drill. Keep on track and make sure you cover all you need to. And one of the most important, make sure you review what you did. What went right? What went wrong? What to do different next time?

    Comming up with training ideas should not be hard, this is the job we do every day. But unorganized training can cause members to loose interest and become upset with how your dept. operates

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Sedro-Woolley WA
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Keep it fun but get the point of the training across. Always have class room before fire ground ops. This gives everyone an idea what is expected. After the drill meet again to discuss what went on and what you need to work on or what seemed to work better.

    We have in the past made a competion out of some training. For example. Suppley lays and speed-lay deployment. Set this up with crews of 3.
    Driver
    Officer
    Firefighter

    Set out a cone 200'from the hydrant. Proceed to the hydrant and spot the truck so that you can connect to the plug with out any bends in the supply line. Next deploy 150' speed lay and start flowing @120psi. The Driver needs to supply the speed lay and get water to the truck before you use 1/4 or 1/2 tank depending on tank size. Make this a time event. See if the next team of 3 can beat the first time and so on. Remember to stress saftey. This gets everyone a chance to get involved. It also gives them a chance to learn the equipment and work with other members.

    As a volunteer dept. you need to learn to work with low manning. Thats what you get on most first out engines.

    Hope this helps. Remember get ideas from other dept. around you and see what they are doing.

  7. #7
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,739

    Smile Here's More.....

    I've posted this before, but here it is again. www.mfri.org This is the website for the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute. They are the training resource for the State of Maryland. (and everyone else, too.) You can download drills from them and use them before the ink dries. Give them a try. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, Canada
    Posts
    26

    Default Training

    One of the things I have noticed during training is that FF's are used to constantly ribbing and taking shots at other FF's, especially when from the same dept. This can make it difficult to do training because the student FF's can interrupt to take shots at the instructor...I haven't quite figured out a good solution other than hitting them with a straight stream when they turn their backs.

    SubarcticFF

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts