1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Saginaw, Tx
    Posts
    81

    Default Fixed cab custom pumpers

    I was curious about people opinions of fixed cab pumpers. I have seen several lately mainly from Seagrave. I realize that it may be simply personal opinion, but what are the advantages other than ease of service of the tilt over the fixed?

  2. #2
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    243

    Default

    We have 3 trucks with fixed cabs and can't think of one positive thing to pass on.
    Ok, here's one, It won't fall on your head.
    We HAD 2 old Fords/FMC with the 4 guy lift on your own, quick put the support in!!!.
    Now we push a button and it slowly, gracefully raises on it's own. Thanks Pierce.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Feb 1999
    Location
    River Edge, NJ, USA
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Seagrave is, (as far as I am aware of), the only manufacturer that makes a true fixed, non-tilting cab. It is called the "J" cab. It is the cab preferred in FDNY. One of the reasons for this is that many of the firehouses in NYC have low ceilings, along with virtually no ramps outside. If these were tilt cabs, they could not be worked on in the station, along with no room outside quarters to park the apparatus and raise the cab. Thus, the fixed cab. This cab is NOT mechanic friendly. It is my opinion that if FDNY stopped purchasing the fixed cab, Seagrave would no longer offer it. Tilt cab is the way to go!!
    GRC063

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Pierce Arrow is, I believe, still a fixed cab.
    If the reason you want a fixed cab is to go back to the rear doghouse style, other manfacturers have this version in a tilt as well as regular topside access.

  5. #5
    Let's talk fire trucks!
    BoxAlarm187's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,348

    Default

    Originally posted by Rotoray
    Pierce Arrow is, I believe, still a fixed cab.
    Roto-Ray (great screen name!):

    FYI, Pierce stopped offering the Arrow about 12 months ago. It faced two problems: 1. no one wanted to buy a fixed cab anymore, and 2. the dog house could not be modified (for a reasonable cost) to fit the new exhaust emission standards for the 2003 EPA-compliant motors.



  6. #6
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    49

    Default

    being one of those guys that always ride in the back. I have ridden in both fixed (doghouse) and tilt (forward engine) rigs. not only does the forward engine design permit greater room inback, particularly in short length 6 man cabs. However I think the greatest benifit of the forward engine tilt cab is that the members in the back can exit either or both sides. If you do allot of highway responses, it comes in handy not having to get out on the traffic side.
    I'm the Midnight Skulker, HAHAHAHAHA

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Posts
    820

    Default

    To add to what grc063 said if I may about Seagrave. Seagrave still makes the non-tilt J cab as he stated. They also still produce the L cab which is their low profile version of the J cab (Barrier doors not an option) like the new Baltimore City Ladder Co. 25. It is the same height as the J cab but the roof is notched for an aerial. It replaced the W cab for low profile aerial applications. Additionally Seagrave continues to produce the T cab which can be speced as either a split tilt OR full tilt. The Flame and Marauder series are their other offerings that are a full tilt cab. Just some thoughts.

    Stay low and move it in.

    P.S.: Alot of Seagrave customers still spec and buy the J cab by choice. Eventhough F.D.N.Y. is a large order customer, I doubt they would discontinue it if F.D.N.Y. quit buying it. In particular anyone buying an Aerialscope and wanting a Seagrave chassis would pretty much be limited to the J cab.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

  8. #8
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    60

    Question Seagrave Aerialscope

    Station2, Why do you need a non-tilt cab with an Aerialscope? Since the scope is midship mount and hangs over the back (a long way) I wouldn't think the cab type mattered much.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Posts
    820

    Default

    You do not need to have a fixed cab to have an Aerialscope. They will build with the Spartan and HME cabs (which are tilt). I said if you want a Seagrave cab, it will be the J series fixed cab. This is because the tilt cab Seagrave models have not been engineered for the aerialscope at this time.


    Stay low and move it in.
    Last edited by STATION2; 03-11-2003 at 10:06 PM.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

  10. #10
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    7

    Default

    In reply to Station2's response regarding the fixed cab on an Aerialscope, the reason a tilt cab is not offered in this application is due to weight issues on the front axle. This is also why you cannot get a tilt style cab on a Seagrave Apollo aerial platform. The "L" style cab has the frame rails lowered immediately ahead of the radiator. That is how Seagrave can get the low overall height without having to also "notch" the cab front area. FYI!!

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Box Alarm,
    Thanks for the update on arrows. I know detroit received 3 arrow aerials last year. I wonder if they are still available for the re-cabs at their refurb center?
    "The light that goes around, even up-side down".

  12. #12
    Forum Member
    CAPN22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Blackfalds, AB, CAN
    Posts
    186

    Default

    Fixed cabs are a maintainace Nightmare. Inspections are difficult as not everythings is visable. And if any major engine work is needed you need one of these things depending on ease and space. Lift the cab off, Drop the engnine and transmission out the bottom. or make a hole in the roof, unbolt the dog house and pull it all out the new sun roof. Even changing a sepentine belt or Alt can be an undaunting task due to limited access.

    Fixed cabs are cheaper to purchase but as things need to be serviced and repaired down the road you'll pay thru the nostrils.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register