1. #1
    Forum Member
    StayBack500FT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    2,236

    Default ChiefReason is right -- Here's my attempt for some meaningful exchange.

    The ideal firefighter -- 2003....what must he/she have? I'm not talking tools or apparatus...I'm talking smarts, guts integrity...etc. What is it that we want all these Junior Firefighters to turn into...or if you had a new applicant, what qualities would you look for? Where are we striving to go as firefighters?


    There Chief...I gave it a shot.
    May we never forget our fallen, worldwide.

    I.A.C.O.J. Safety/Traffic Control Officer

    E6511

    "Who's Who Among American Teachers" - 2005, 2006 Honoree

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    firenresq77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    5,213

    Default

    OK, I'll start off with a few.....

    One of the most important things is to be a good listener......

    Someone who will pay attention.

    Quick learner

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    PTownHustlers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    16

    Default Am I too old?

    How about a trade or skill background to begin with? How many out there see new FF's with not even basic tool skills? A lot of college educated, academy grads that can't even start the leaf blower...or worse, ask what "MIX" means written on the side of a gas can.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
    KLMR23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hopefully, a parallel universe where my location doesn't keep getting deleated.
    Posts
    46

    Arrow How about this?

    Common sense.

    It's not really something that can be taught, yet it makes a huge difference on the street.
    TUTUM TE ROBORE REDDAM
    **********
    In Valor, There Is Hope.

  5. #5
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    depends
    Posts
    152

    Default

    I'd like to see new firefighters who have held some type of job, or seen military service prior to coming on. We get guys right out of school who never had to work in a warehouse or punch a time clock or take orders from anyone who wasn't a teacher - no practical skills, in other words. And no idea how the rest of the world lives.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Duffman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Chicago area
    Posts
    780

    Default

    Honesty
    Integrity
    Willingness to learn
    Humble
    Mop in his hand not on his head
    Fits in because he doesn't try to
    Earns respect instead of demanding it


    How's that for starters
    "We shouldn't be opening firehouses in Baghdad and closing them in New York City."

    IACOJ

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    868

    Default

    Funny this should come up now, seeing as it has been a topic around our station for the last week or two after a couple of incidents at fires, not for new firefighters but why which one of our present firefighters should get which job at a working structure fire - for the interior crew the list ended up being someone who

    - has Discipline
    - understands Teamwork
    - has Fitness
    - Communicates well
    - has Ability
    - has the Right Attitude
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

    ...and before you ask - YES I have done a Bloody SEARCH!

  8. #8
    55 Years & Still Rolling
    hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,740

    Thumbs up 'Duff Said.....

    Duff said it for me, as well as several other points raised by others. The points about the attributes needed to be a good student really hit the mark with me. I have long thought that one of our biggest problems is training people who do not have the _______ (insert your own words) to learn what we are trying to teach. The point about "Mix" on a gas can is all too real today. As one well known sage once said, "Damn shame we can't legislate common sense."
    Good point. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    27

    Default

    The two things I would chip in with:
    1. Know your role in the team (if you dont like where you are, study harder for the next promotional exam)
    2. Obey the order (discussions happen in the firehouse)
    I.A.C.O.J.


    SOME ARE FIREMEN
    OTHERS ARE JUST ON
    THE FIRE DEPARTMENT

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Kansas USA
    Posts
    121

    Default

    A lot of what I would want in a new firefighter has already been mentioned. But, common sense is probably the most needed in the fire service today; that and the ability to listen to the more experienced firefighters and officers and learn what they are taught.

  11. #11
    IACOJ BOD
    FlyingKiwi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,757

    Default

    Agree with the above and wish to add

    The ability to read and write.... correctly.

    Just for those irritating tasks such as incident reports, or maintenance forms etc.

    The small things in life.
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber
    dsblev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    62

    Default

    The fire service has changed a lot in the last few years. The biggest thing that any firefighter should have besides the physical ability to do the job is a hunger for more training. Why do most of us participate in these forums. Fun and to learn more information from our fellow brothers and sisters. The conditions that we are facing have been and continue to be ever changing and if the firefighter does not want to learn about these new changes then they are increasing the risk of getting themselves or others hurt or worse.

    Learning opens the door for a whole lot of things. To be able to learn at the level that firefighters need to learn, they must have common sense or they would not be able to learn.

    I recently went to an interview for a larger paid dept and one of the questions they asked is once I have completed my inital 16 wks (if hired) I would have several certs to keep up. Would I keep them up and would I spend time to learn more?
    Knowledge is important
    ----------------------------
    David S. Blevins

    "America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves."

    ~Abraham Lincoln

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    greensburg,pa
    Posts
    28

    Lightbulb Good thread

    I have been ask this question a couple of times in the past year and pretty much answered it like this everytime.

    Give me someone who has common sense and the need to be taught and I'll show you a good fireman. If you have to think about being honest etc.... You lack common sense!!!!!!! There is alot to learn and it never stops and it seems that it gets more complicated everyday.

    On a lighter note I have questioned my common sense for being involved in the fire service but i would not trade it for the world!!!
    " Be safe brothers, WE ALL GO HOME"

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber
    ff7134's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Firefighter

    As DSBleve wrote a thirst for more knowledge and the sense to
    be quiet and listen to the older guys when they are talking.
    My Chief trys to get everyone to go to more schools and most
    will not. That just means more training for Me
    AKA: Mr. Whoo-Whoo

    IAFF Local 3900

    IACOJ-The Crusty Glow Worm

    ENGINE 302 - The Fire Rats

    F.A.N.T.A.M FOOLS FTM-PTB

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    2,983

    Default

    There Chief...I gave it a shot
    Great shot Stayback.

    Disclipline, a desire to learn and respect for those who have more years in the fire service than you have been around. Learn from them. They are great teachers.

    My apologies for throwing my bit in gentlemen as I am not a firefighter. Hope its ok.

  16. #16
    Forum Member
    StayBack500FT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    2,236

    Default

    It's all good Cheffie!
    May we never forget our fallen, worldwide.

    I.A.C.O.J. Safety/Traffic Control Officer

    E6511

    "Who's Who Among American Teachers" - 2005, 2006 Honoree

  17. #17
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Essex Junction, Vt.
    Posts
    148

    Default

    Willing to admit when they make mistakes and learn from them.

    And on those occasions when they don't make a mistake, or when mistakes are made that are not their fault, willing to ask themselves,"What might I have done better?" or "What might I have done to prevent the mistake?"
    TW
    Essex Junction Fire Dept.
    Vermont

  18. #18
    MembersZone Subscriber
    ChiefReason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Illinois-where pertnear is close enough!
    Posts
    5,636

    Default Nice shot, Stayback!

    I have seen some very impressive responses and I would like to thank everyone for your thoughtful and civil discussion. I would like to add my thoughts.
    At the top of our department's stationary are the words "HONOR" and "BRAVERY". To a firefighter, those words are how they conduct their lives. To others, they are just words. But the simple fact is; if you don't measure up to those two, simple words, you will fail as a firefighter.
    What is "honor"? In my mind, that is respecting one and other; even the newbies, probies, explorers, juniors and oldest veterans. It is watching each other's back. It is putting aside your differences, because you are on the same team. It is wanting to be better, not only as firefighters, but as human beings. It is remembering those who died before us and learning from it, so the same fate doesn't befall us. It is standing shoulder to shoulder in the grandest of traditions as one voice to re-assure our communities that we will not fail them. To me, THAT IS AN HONOR!
    What is "bravery"? To me, that is knowing when to stay and fight and knowing when to step back and re-evaluate it. It is at that moment of truth when you know you don't have on all the proper gear but seconds are critical to the survival of another human life and you know that you finished at the top of your class and at that moment, you make your decision based; not on what you have learned, but what you have in your heart. And let God decide your fate. To me, bravery is also knowing that you can't do that and choose another profession.
    All of the books, classes, practicals, decals, rotating lights and best turnout gear that money can buy will never make you a firefighter, unless you have it in your heart. If you don't have the heart, the rest is just fluff.
    So, I guess to answer the question put forth by Stayback, I want firefighters who will conduct themselves by those two simple words; “honor” and “bravery”.
    CR
    Visit www.iacoj.com
    Remember Bradley Golden (9/25/01)
    RIP HOF Robert J. Compton(ENG6511)

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    StayBack500FT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    2,236

    Default

    Originally posted by TWEJFD
    Willing to admit when they make mistakes and learn from them.


    I realllllly like this one.





    TY ChiefReason
    May we never forget our fallen, worldwide.

    I.A.C.O.J. Safety/Traffic Control Officer

    E6511

    "Who's Who Among American Teachers" - 2005, 2006 Honoree

  20. #20
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    2,983

    Default

    CR Those are awesome words. I had to wipe a tear away after reading them. Thank you.

  21. #21
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Conshohocken, PA
    Posts
    391

    Default Scout code

    I'm sure some will find the following words hoaky, but they are as true today as they were so many years ago when I first learned them.

    1. Trustworthy
    2. Loyal
    3. Helpful
    4. Friendly
    5. Courteous
    6. Kind
    7. Obedient
    8. Cheerful
    9. Thrifty
    10. Brave
    11. Clean
    12. Reverent

    While these are the boy scout laws, I find that these are also very appropriate for those who would be members of the fire service.

  22. #22
    MembersZone Subscriber
    AFD368's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Albion NY
    Posts
    407

    Default

    All of the above responses are excellent, but one I would add is patience
    "The uniform is supposed to say something about you. You get it for nothing, but it comes with a history, so do the right thing when you're in it."
    Battalion Chief Ed Schoales
    from 'Report from Ground Zero' pg 149
    I.A.C.O.J. Member

  23. #23
    55 Years & Still Rolling
    hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,740

    Smile My second $.02 worth..........

    Cheffie, you made an excellent point, and, I am sure everyone out there joins me in saying that your comments are always OK. And To ChiefR, I just can't add anything to that. Thank You. BTW, AFD - Did you mean patience for the rookie, for the crustie, or for all of us?? Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  24. #24
    MembersZone Subscriber
    AFD368's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Albion NY
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Patience is a virtue. Patience should be observed by all.
    "The uniform is supposed to say something about you. You get it for nothing, but it comes with a history, so do the right thing when you're in it."
    Battalion Chief Ed Schoales
    from 'Report from Ground Zero' pg 149
    I.A.C.O.J. Member

  25. #25
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, Canada
    Posts
    26

    Default Best Skills

    I think the best skill a new FF can bring to a dept is a new skill. That is: something the rest of the Dept can learn. The Fire Dept (I am thinking volly departments) should have at least one FF with the following:

    Framing Carpentry
    Electrician
    Plumber
    Mechanic
    Doctor (couldn't hurt?
    Architect
    Engineers
    Teachers
    Electronics (for fire panels)
    etc...

    That way everybody on the dept can exchange ideas and teach the others...

    It also doesn't hurt to have somebody who works in each major building in town so you have a set of keys on site for any fire call asap...but that in an ideal world...they probably forget to bring them at 3am anyway...

    SubArcticFF

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register