1. #1
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    Question Exercise-Induced-Asthma and firefighting

    I just found out that I have EIA or exercise-induced-asthma. I have been told that it shouldn't affect my activities at all and an Albuterol inhaler should take care of it. Does anyone have any experience with this? I hope this will not hurt my chances to volunteer.

    Darcy

  2. #2
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    I have the same problem and for some time. The only problem that I have found is that when you are first starting to use the SCBA because of lung capacity it's a little trying to get use to it but just like anything else it just takes a little time, practice and patience. You won't even know.

  3. #3
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    Post EIA

    Darcy,
    I have just a little first hand experience with this, having a daughter who has this condition. She is a high school basketball player and a weightlifter. After the initial diagnosis in seventh grade and a little experimentation to see which meds and doseage schedules worked the best, she has gone on to excell in bb and hold the female records in school for weightlifting as a junior.
    Consult with your local asthma association or check with the resp therapy dept at a hospital. Either one will point you in the right direction and be happy to help you manage your condition (never view it as an illness). It is a treatable condition that is easily managed.Here are also a couple web sites that have tons of info and will give links to tons more. www.aarc.org and www.aafa.org.
    Keep your inhaler with you at all times. When you are on the way to a call or before you go out the door, Administer the inhaler--USE A SPACER!!! By the time you get to the scene, the meds should be starting to work and you should have no problem. Try this out first though in training evolutions so you can be 100% sure that it is controlled. Do what works best for you. Ashtma control is very patient specific. What works for one person, may not be what works for someone else.
    As a resp therapist one of the more satisfying aspects is patient education and helping people reach thier goals.EIA should have no effect on activities or goals of being a firefighter.
    Hope I've been of some help, JOHN

  4. #4
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    Smile Thats good to know

    Thanks Flathead and FyrMedic3 for your responses. I don't want anything to get in the way of my goals.

    Thanks again,
    Darcy

  5. #5
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    Exclamation ASTHMA INDUCED...

    Hi D'arcy~

    The two of them were right who commented before i did. You should check with your local asthma association, and keep a regular schedule where you insert the medications. It is also important to let just the chief know that you have asthma, but it shouldn't be a problem. It is better to come clean with the problem before, then have an attack happen, and them not knowing. JMO.
    Firefighters are beneficial to every community with the wealth of information they have!

    They don't get enough praise, for the information and skills they know! It could save your life one day!!!!!

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