1. #1
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    Default ? on hose bed stacking and unloading

    My dept. just got 1,300 of 3" supply hose. I was wondering for information on the best way to load and stack it in the hose bed. Most of use are think stacking it on end accordian style. We stack our cross lays that way and works well for us. Also since this is the first time our dept has had supply hose to use (we just got our first 4 fire hydrants last year), could any one give me some advise our deploying 3" supply hose from the hydrant to the house. Any special trade secrets or do's and don't thatwe should know. We are planing to practice laying a line in a school parking lot. Thanks for your help.

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    A few things we need to know:

    What size are the hydrant mains?
    What is the average hydrant pressure?
    How many and what size are the hydrant outlets?
    How many lengths are going on each engine?
    Do you supply master streams at any time?
    Do you have standpipes and/or sprinklers in your district?
    Last edited by E229Lt; 04-10-2003 at 09:20 AM.

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    And why didnt you just go for 4 inch ldh???

    Anyway try horseshoe for the rear bed and if you put it in a side compartment try double-donut.
    Last edited by dfdex1; 04-10-2003 at 12:20 PM.

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    We use 5" LDH and flat load it with the coupling tied to a hydrant bag with webbing via a lark's foot.

    Eric

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    Talking Hose Lay

    We use a Flat lay. It's not the very pretty but it works.

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    forward lay or reverse lay?
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
    IACOJ Attack

    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

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    Originally posted by RyanEMVFD
    forward lay or reverse lay?
    Neither, it's LDH with Storz couplings. We do have 500' of 2.5" laid for supply which is a flat load (reverse lay), which is set up for the two FDCs we have in district (going to be adding 10 more in the next year).

    Eric

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    Default

    The accordian style worked for me at a previous department where 3" supply line was used. I'd also suggest mounting your hydrant wrench in an easy-to-reach position on the back step... And tying a rope from the last coupling to the wrench. That makes it easy to pull supply line if your hose bed is very far off the ground.

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    Default

    My dept. just got 1,300 of 3" supply hose. I was wondering for information on the best way to load and stack it
    Roll it and put it away in the station, then put 5" on the truck.

    Just kidding
    "We shouldn't be opening firehouses in Baghdad and closing them in New York City."

    IACOJ

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    Default

    First let me say we only have 6" and 4" rural water lines and a annual budget of $3,800. So 4" and 5" are totally out of the question. We were lucky to get a grant to get the 3". Plus we are probably only going to use it maybe twice a year and most fire calls we only have 3to 5 firefighters.
    Ok here some info. We have 6" hydrants with a 51/2 main and two 2 1/2's, Average pressure is about 80psi., We have 26 lengths of 50ft 3" hose with 2 1/2" couplings. No master stream at this time, and no building big enough for standpipes. We in a rural farming community. We are laying forward lay. Is there anything our drive should know about laying the line. Going around curves and such? Thanks for the help.

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    My department has both 3 inch and 5 inch supply lines. All or hose is packed in a flat lay style. Our 3 inch hose beds are split by a divider in the middle. It allows us to pack 600 feet of hose in each bed. This allows for a 1200 foot single lay or by breaking a coupling a 600 foot double lay. This lay works well for us and it's not hard to learn.
    As for hitting the hydrant my department "gates" the hydrant. The 1st supply line is attached to a ball valve on one of the 2 1/2 ports. The second 2 1/2 port has a Gated "Y" attached to it. The reason we do this is so you don't have to shut the hydrant down to hook up more supply lines or to shut down a supply line.

    As for the do's and don'ts:
    DO test the hydrant before you hook up to it or the truck leaves.
    DON'T try to hold the hose when truck starts to move. Wrap the hose around the hydrant as an anchor.
    DO drive slow and to the side of the road when laying hose.
    DON'T allow firefighter on back step when laying hose.
    Last edited by XCAPT1; 04-11-2003 at 03:23 AM.

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    Default 2 cents...

    When shoulder carrying large, heavy hose like this
    3 inch, make surethe couplings are on your BACK.
    Why? So if someone steps on the hose and/or there
    is a snag, the couplings wont come in contact
    with your face.

    Couplings on back- Good.
    Couplings on front- Bad.

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    Default

    We have 3" in our department (our hydrants won't support a larger line with the flow rates we have in the rural area of our county). We used the horseshoe lay and it has worked great for us. It comes off easily and is not difficult to load or reload. Just remember to tuck in the male end so that it isn't "visible" when viewing the back of the truck, we have had folks with tunnel vision attempt to pull the house out backwards as a result by grabbing the first coupling they could see. Rookies on adrenalyn can almost remove a horseshoe stack backwards. Have the female end readily visible and everything works very smoothly and we have never had a problem with this type of lay coming off the truck unless it is supposed to. My other department used the traditional lay for our 5" supply line and over a particularly bumpy road unintentionally layed 1,000 feet of 5" well before they got to the fire (fortunately wasn't the first due engine!). Good luck!

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    Default

    use a flat lay ---- its almost impossible to mess
    up a flat lay.
    You say you only have a few hydrants and you wont use
    it much. Jest cuz you dont have many plugs ,dont mean
    that you wont need your supply line other ways. Im a
    bettin you got a lot of long driveways and narrow dead
    end roads. Always worked a lot better to lay in and
    leave all that tanker traffic on the main road.
    Specially when its muddy. How bout any stock ponds orcricks
    close by ? Feller can reverse out do some good.
    Fellers were asking bout forward or reverse?
    We uns dont worry bout it -- we alay in in the bed one way or
    the other and then jest hook up a couple them "UH OH" adaptors
    keep a couple extra on the engine and were good ta go
    in or out.

  15. #15
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    Default My $0.02

    I would flat lay 12 lengths on each of two pumpers. I would also pre-con one length to each pumper's side (gated) inlet.

    Layout your hose with the female on top in the beds, so you are pulling the female off first. You have no siamese or master stream issues, so this is your best option. As for the 1 length pre-con, I would attach the female to the inlet via a double male fitting and attach a 5 1/2x3" double female for the free end. This will be your primary hydrant connection when the rig is adjacent to the hydrant. Each rig should also have a dedicated outlet with a 3x2.5" double female attached.

    Stretching in: Due to the size of your mains, I would NOT stretch more than 6 lengths (300') of 3" between the hydrant and the pumper. Friction loss will reduce your incoming supply too much after that. If your hydrant is further away I would request a relay from the second engine.

    Relay layout: The second engine stops at the first and drops it's 3" female end then proceeds to the hydrant. Connect the primary hydrant line to the 5 1/2" outlet, break the 3" supply laid to pumper #1 and connect it to the dedicated female 3" outlet. You're ready to pump.
    The first engine disconnects it's primary hydrant line from the inlet (leaving the double male connected) and connects the supply line from engine #2 to the double male. Have engine #2 charge the line, open your inlet gate and pump away.

    I now await comments, corrections, questions and applause!

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