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  1. #1
    Temporarily/No Longer Active dfdex1's Avatar
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    Default Hydrant restoration ?'s

    I just got a fire hydrant from the water dept. I am makeing a training aide out of it for hydrant dressing drills(at the station) for indoors as well as a yard decoration (at my house) on its down time. I got a problem with it though is the there is about 2' of pipe that is below the ground line that I want to take off because it makes it extremely heavy and to tall for my purposes. Do any of you have suggestion how to do it?

    And do any of you have hydrants that you have restored or got sites about restoring hydrants?

    thanks
    dfd
    Last edited by dfdex1; 04-11-2003 at 04:26 PM.


  2. #2
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    Ok, I can forgive incorrect grammar and spelling of words in common usage, but not jargon in the fire service!

    hydrant not hydrent!

    Eric

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber ullrichk's Avatar
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    I've done two hydrant cutaways for training/ISO purposes for two different departments. I've had to cut down both hydrants for the very reason you mention.

    Just mark and cut a section out of the buried portion so that the overall height is whatever you happen to want/need. I used a cutoff saw with an abrasive metal blade - you can buy abrasive blades for a circular saw, too, but it would be a little harder to keep a straigt line.

    Next, cut the same length out of the control rod. You may be able to cut a little off the end and drill a new hole, or you may have to section the rod in the middle, depending on the type of breakaway.

    Weld the pieces back together and dress the welds with a grinder as needed.

    If you need any more info, just ask. I'll help however I can.
    ullrichk
    a.k.a.
    perfesser

    a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

  4. #4
    Temporarily/No Longer Active dfdex1's Avatar
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    On mine the rod on the inside is gone.
    What I want to do is to make a little cart for it to sit on that has wheels.
    So when I bring it to the station we can take it off my truck put it in its carrier and wheel it in and do a hydrant dressing drill without haveing to take a truck outside and mess with a real hydrant and also wheel it into the elevator to take it upstairs. But when I bring it home I can pop it out of its carrier and put it on my porch.

    The problem is,it doesnt have a "flange" where it is bolted to the pipe that goes under ground,it just has a little "lip" just above the ground line. Since the rod is not in there I cant be sure that "lip" is the break point.

    Would a K-12 saw do a good job cutting it?
    What kinda paint would you use on it ?
    How could I secure it to the base,yet have still take it out easily?

    I just looked at it and it is a "American Darling" and the pipe is 5", if that helps any in thinking of it.

    thanks
    dfd

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber ullrichk's Avatar
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    A K-12 is perfect. Just mark your cut with a sharpie pen and wear safety glasses!!!

    As for painting, I had my hydrants sandblasted and primed with RustOleum black. I left the underground bits black and painted the barrel, bonnet, etc, just like the ones in town. We happen to use industrial oil base paint from Sherwin Williams, but any goos oil base will work fine. I went back and highlighted the foundry data with a contrasting color.

    As for where to cut and how to mount it:

    Do you have the 90 degree fitting that goes on the bottom? One hydrant I did was tapped for a 1" bolt in the bottom and is attached to a 2 ft by 2 ft piece of 1/2 steel with some HEAVY DUTY casters.

    That's one option.

    I did another by taking an old welding table and cutting a hole in the center for the operating rod and drilling holes for the bolts that hold the barrel to the riser with the breakaway flanges. Some astroturf on the table makes the scene complete: the above ground stuff sits on "grass" and the below ground stuff is under the table.

    And yes, the breakaway is at the point where the barrel and riser meet. Do you have the semicircular flanges that clamp that little lip on the riser to the bottom flange of the barrel?

    Sorry for the lengthy post, but this would be a lot easier for me to explain if I had a pic of one of my finished hydrants!
    ullrichk
    a.k.a.
    perfesser

    a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

  6. #6
    Temporarily/No Longer Active dfdex1's Avatar
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    No mine doesnt have any bolts connecting it to the riser its just a lip of metal----it reminds me of railroad rail that is welded by thermite.

  7. #7
    Forum Member ThNozzleman's Avatar
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    I can send you larger photos if you want to get a closer look.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  8. #8
    Forum Member ThNozzleman's Avatar
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    We cut our hydrant with a plasma cutter. It did an EXCELLENT job, left smooth, clean edges, and it was easy to cut along contours and curves.

  9. #9
    Temporarily/No Longer Active dfdex1's Avatar
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    Wow thats a nice hydrant!

  10. #10
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    Jest what is a hydrant "dressing" drill? The only
    thang our hydrants ever wore was a coat of paint
    fact is most of em wear a coat like Joseph.
    Now if your amaking a hydrant cutaway fur training.
    You need to chase down all the guts including the foot
    valve. Kinda hard to splain how it works without
    all the parts. We even saved a couple of the breakaway
    bolts fur ashowing. Oh yea we sliced ourn with a K saw
    and a couple of boxes of Doans pills.

  11. #11
    Temporarily/No Longer Active dfdex1's Avatar
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    Hydrant "dressing" is when you pull up with the truck drop off a firefighter and then he attaches the fittings and such to the hydrant.

  12. #12
    Forum Member ThNozzleman's Avatar
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    Here's another one that is used by Morristown Fire Department.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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