Thread: Bee's!

  1. #1
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    Default Bee's!

    While reviewing "training" videos (Reruns of Rescue 911 on Discovery Health) today there was an episode on a male being attacked by bees.
    I read an article the other evening on bees also.
    On the R-911 episode, no one was prepared to deal with this incident. The FD was overwhelmed and beaten back from helping the patient.
    As a reminder...
    CLASS A FOAM WILL SUPPRESS BEES. Also, a tyvek haz-mat suite is good protection from bee stings. If you don't have access to these, turnouts, SCBA with duct taped seams will protect you.

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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    Smoke works as well, although it is tricky to come across in this job.
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

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    I REMEMBER THAT EPISODE WHEN IT WAS NEW!!

    Smoke could be tough without causing an even bigger problem. Great, now the bees are all dead but the patient is suffocating from smoke inhalation and surrounded by the encroaching brush fire.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    Forget the the foam---try poison!

    I was installing a new eletrical service today and as soon as we cut off the old meter socket there was a big a** nest of them that was burried into the wood behind it. Well after restarting my heart and booking to my truck. I went to the hardware store to buy some good old fashion bee poison. I went back and "neutralized" the insect problem.

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    OOOPS.

    Guess it must be time for plan B.

    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

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    Call a bee keeper. You most likely have one near by and don't even know it.
    "What makes a person run into a building others are running out of?...Character."- Dennis Smith

    www.elmirafire.org

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    Thumbs up

    And if you are stung remember B.E.E.S and W.A.S.P!

    Bases,Eleveiate(spelling i know),Excessive,Swelling
    If you get stung by a bee or something like it accept for a wasp,make a paste of bakeing soda and water and put it on the sting and the pain and swelling will go away,cause bee venom is acidic.

    Wash(with),Acid,Swelling,Prevented
    If it was a Wasp that stung you use a acid (Lemon juice,vineger,etc) to stop and reduce swelling and pain cause wasp venom is a alkali

    I got the soultion from my FR book ,the acronymms(spelling?)I made my self to remember it. Kinda stupid but helps when them little buggas get ya and it make the pain go away real fast since it neutrailizes the venom.
    -dfd
    Last edited by dfdex1; 04-17-2003 at 12:05 AM.

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    How about water? well, to get the bees of the victim with out getting to close.

    That R-911 show, what happend to it? I havent seen it in years.
    The bee episode, is that with the mentaly disabled kid? If it was, then that show (the taping, not sure of the acutal incedent) took place 2 towns away from me!

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    Smoke, I like smoke...

    Poison? I just don't know how the Medical Control or the patient for that matter would like me hosing someone down with POISON. I'll use that for poor defenseless bees with no one to attack.

    The episode was of a male who was on a tractor mowing and came across a nest and was attacked. The first arriving deputy also suffered from the attack. The FD pulled on scene and also found themselves under attack. No disabled folks.

    Bees can fly or chase up to 15 mph and have been known to chase someone up to 300 yards.

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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    No disabled folks.
    The disabled kid whas the person who ran to the next door neighbors to call 911

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    I worked as a BEE Keeper during my summer vacations during High School. Smoke would be the best to use and the way to do it is rather easy. BEE Keepers use smokers that generally dont make alot of fire but rather just smoke. We would burn old gunny sacks with oil in the bottom of the smoker. If you need you can burn a rag with oil in the bottom of a coffee can, also replace the lid (only after you have cut a hole in the center to direct the smoke in a single direction. Most often it will not produce flame but rather just smother and create alot of smoke....give it a try this summer if you need!
    D. Hager
    Paramedic

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    Default Get more info here...

    Get more info. on bees from this link...
    http://www.lacofd.org/ahb.htm

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    I seem to remember them finally getting the patient and jumping in the back of a pickup truck and hauling @ss out of there.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    Statisticaly this thread shows that most Firefighters prefer smoke,

    Funny that.
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

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    Got a FoamPak? In the Darley Catalog you'll find the "FoamPak" from fire hooks unlimited... We have one. I hooked ours up to the garden hose and use it w/ the smoothbore tip and foamed down our "Letters" on the front of the building b/c the wasps have the hollow letters filled w/ nests. I don't know about anyone else, But I'm severely allergic to even one sting, and don't carry anything to treat it. I tried 7 different types of poison... One sprayed from 50 feet away and made a three foot bank of foam stuck to the wall... Didn't do the job. The bee's in the nest still survived. So I figured if I got the nests wet, they'd be easier to knock apart w/ high pressure. So ya pull a line out and wet them down, then apply a few minutes of direct knock down agent... They're dead.

    Or dish detergent in one of those garden hose attachments for Miracle Grow. That'd be my choice. Get one of the 1 1/2" to garden hose reducers, and inform the patient to close their eyes, remain calm (May seem hard, but still) Spray them w/ the foam or detergent... Dead bee's... The soap clogs their respiratory system, and they cannot breathe, so they die almost instantly. Also, a "fog" pattern w/ the foam may kill the whole swarm. I've been foamed during fires, and it didn't hurt me.. So probably won't hurt the victim..?

    Of course maybe a good smoke stick will work too. They are quick to impliment, and work relativly fast. I grew up w/ a bee keeper nearby and I've seen how bee keepers work, and the smoke works wonders to calm the whole swarm. Makes them tired, so they return to the nest. You can use old cloth, clean motor oil, and green grass. Still don't breathe it in, but this is the best way to get alot of smoke quickly. Remember, you want smoke, not fire, so make sure you put the green grass right on the fire, not put it out, just enough to get it smoldering. You can put it in a big tin can and duct tape it to a pike pole. Or nail a coffee can to a long dowel rod. Just my 2 cents.

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    nmfire, you are correct, all of the responders and victim jumped into the backs of pickups and drove away from the incident.
    I do like and understand the smoke idea. But I'm looking at this from the responding to and emergency standpoint.
    All of our rigs on the job and in our VFD carry class A foam. I personally think this to be the quickest and most effective "emergency move". The foam isn't going to affect me or the patient like the smoke would if I or him were to inhale it.
    A couple years ago, I was on a wildland fire assignment in Waco Texas. We were based at an airport and the retardent dropping tankers were also based out of this airport. Bees seemed to be drawn to the retardant mixture. We didn't know about foam at the time so they called a local bee keeper or pest control person and they took care of them.

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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