1. #1
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    Default Basics, people, basics!

    I have a comment about the LA computer syetm thing that could easily be applied to the fire service. In this day and age of computers on the trucks, IRIS and other imaging devices, and the like, I definatly think this needs to be said. We should never forget the basics. All the lessons we learned over the years of the fire service should not be lost. I am not, however, trying to bash any department or any person for this, I am simply saying that we all need to take a step back, look at what we are doing, and do some things different. Lets not lose those basic skills that we fought and died to come up with. For instance, I know of a few of the young gun firefighters ( course, with less than two years as a volly, I guess I count as one) who, upon rolling up to a fire scene in an aerial, will not even consider putting up a few ground ladders. I mean, shoot, the big aerial is there, why would we need to do this ground ladder crap? Well ,let me tell you, there are also some other guys I know who, if not for ground ladders, and even some basic roping skills, would not be around today. Am I the only one who feels this way, or do other people see this too?
    Isiah 43: When you walk through the fire,
    you will not be burned;
    the flames will not set you ablaze
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    9-11-01. We Will Never Forget You.

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    Default Re: Basics, people, basics!

    Originally posted by SkipJack270
    basic roping skills
    YEEEHAW! Welcome to the Rodeo!

    On a sidenote, yes, I agree. Emphasizing technology is always important, but it is the tip of the pyramid, whereas FFI skills are at the base.

    Eric

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    Default

    I agree that the "Basics" are near the base of what is needed in a successful firefighter, but I feel you could go even further down the base to your core education, life experiences and good old common sense to find out what is realy needed to be good at our job. I have seen a fair number of firefighters get through FF1&2 with flying colors and once they are on the job, while doing a technically adequate job, fail at things like tact, general awareness and tackling the big decisions in crisis situations. Well done class work is a big part of a good firefighter but he or she needs to be smart in other areas too.
    "What makes a person run into a building others are running out of?...Character."- Dennis Smith

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    Originally posted by Engine5FF
    I agree that the "Basics" are near the base of what is needed in a successful firefighter, but I feel you could go even further down the base to your core education, life experiences and good old common sense to find out what is realy needed to be good at our job.
    I can definitely agree with that. Good point.

    Eric

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    Pa usta say "you can teach a feller the job----
    but ya can't teach him ta work"

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    Common sense is the application of aquired knowledge. There is no substitute for experience, but the training we receive during our careers is a good basis for application of common sense.

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    To quote a good friend of mine:

    " If you throw a book at a fire, does it go out?"
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

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    No it doesn't go out, but the information contained therein is lost.
    I haven't met a fire fighter yet that didn't have some training, for that matter how about EMS were we just born with that knowledge? We learned it somewhere and I'll bet it's written in a book.

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    I am a big proponent of book knowledge, but I guess what I am saying is if I read all of the books written about performing surgery, does that make me a surgeon? Or, does that make me someone that knows alot about surgery?
    My opinion is you can have book knowledge to get a start on things but to be proficient at it experience is essential.
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

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    Maybe I'm saying it wrong, I think there is no substitute for experience, but you do have to have some training and education about the matter to start gaining the experience. I started in a company that got just about 100 runs a year, but everyday of day work we practiced with the equipment so we would be familiar with its use. I soon decided that I was too young to be retired on full pay so I transferred to a company that got at least that many runs a month, sometimes 2 and 3 times that many, but I did have a good basis in basics when I got there.

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    Hey TheOldSchool, good to see you here. Haven't seen too many people from Baltimore City posting here. Your insight and input will be most valuable. I doubt there are any companies in the city that only do 100 runs a year any more by quite a long shot!
    Chris Minick, P.E., Firefighter II
    Structures Specialist, MD-TF 1

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    I.A.C.O.J. Building crust and proud of it

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    No even the fireboat topped that, but I spent 3 years at 19 Truck before I transferred to The Old School. Good to hear from you. Do you work at UM?

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    No, not UM. Actually I work for an engineering consulting firm in Towson designing bridges. I also serve as a Structure Specialist (engineer) on the Montgomery County Collapse Rescue (FEMA) team. I've been a Baltimore County volunteer for about 15 years and before that I was a member of an ambulance company in Allegany County. I used to work at SHA just down the street from the old quarters of Truck 16. I used to get a kick out of watching the truck go up Calvert Street with the tractor over by the left hand curb and the tiller portion by the right curb so they could stop traffic and get the truck back in quarters.
    Last edited by CJMinick390; 04-25-2003 at 02:19 PM.
    Chris Minick, P.E., Firefighter II
    Structures Specialist, MD-TF 1

    These statements are mine and mine alone
    I.A.C.O.J. Building crust and proud of it

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    I used to work at Pennocks, right next to T16, when I was working part time.

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