Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    54

    Default type stokes basket for high angle rescue

    Last night at practice a few of our members wanted to practice removing a pt. from a roof top with the lifting lug at the end of or aerial. The building was a two story school with no roof access from the insideof the building. They wanted to practice packaging and removal. After all equiptment was sent to roof, patient packaged, and patient was safely on ground, we reviewed what was done. The question was raised weather we should have used the plastic stokes basket or a wire mesh basket. The plastic stockes is setup with lifting eyes built in and a aluminium frame around the top. We carry both a plastic and steel mesh stokes. Opinions?
    ASST.102
    The few the proud the firefighters from 102

    I.A.C.O.J.


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    If you have the Orange Ferno stokes don't use it for high angle work.

    The yellow JUNKIN is ok or most of the new all metal ones. Get the weight rating from the manufacturer. If memory serves the Ferno is only rated for 500lbs. If it was me I wouldn't want to be dangled in it. Low angle or slope is fine but not for high angle.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber CFD Hazards's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cranston, RI, USA
    Posts
    381

    Default

    I could be wrong but I thought that only the metal/wire stokes basket were rated for rescue. I didn't think that any of the plastic ones were.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    Junkin Plastic Rescue Litter
    The Junkin Rescue Litter features stainless-steel railings with a plastic bottom. Two bottom cross struts are recessed into the plastic and provide side-to-side rigidity, often a problem in conventional plastic litters. The ultralight, polyethylene plastic bed fits on the second rail, leaving the top rail free for carrying, rigging sytems, or mounting the CMC Litter Shield. The rectangular shape accepts full spine boards and the bottom has a full-length foam pad for comfort.

    Passes 1,200 lb. load test.
    Weight: 32 lbs
    Color: Yellow.
    Dimensions: 84 x 24 x 7-1/2 inches.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ga. Power Co./ Juliette Ga
    Posts
    437

    Default

    Traverse Rescue has a basket called a Titan. Its frame is made out of stainless steel. It is load rated at 2500lb. It has a plastic mesh bottom with padding. It is extremely nice.
    The Big thing about the Ferno basket (orange) rated at 600lbs, is we as firefighters do not take the best care of this piece of equipment. The directions on this basket says "Do not store in direct sunlight" and we put them on top of the Engine or rescue exposed to the elements.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber Halligan84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Blackwood NJ, USA
    Posts
    816

    Default

    Properly maintained, there is probably no problem using either. The plastic one seems to be used pretty extensively based on scene photos on firehouse.com and elsewhere. Steel mesh stokes vary greatly in quality. The most basic model is the Junkin (flat bar steel supports) which I haven't seen a weight rating yet. My personal preference is the mil-spec stainless steel stokes. It uses all stainless steel tubing, no flat and passes the 2500 lb load test. Haven't seen a Titan yet, but they look pretty good in catalogs.

  7. #7
    Forum Member RyanEMVFD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    Why? It's not like you're going to visit me! But I'm near Waco, Texas
    Posts
    2,386

    Default

    i've never really liked the wire mesh ones. they tend to get snagged on a lot of things.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
    IACOJ Attack

    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Thanks for the help. Anyone know if there is any standard that says you have to use one type. Like a load rating for high angle rescue? I se from some of the posts 1200 lb and 2500lb. And is any standard when and how to test them. I know if it was me it would be in the back of my mind when I'm 30' off the ground if the basket was tested and safe. we store our plastic one inside a compartment on the recue and the metal mesh on the top of the quint.
    ASST.102
    The few the proud the firefighters from 102

    I.A.C.O.J.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Willington F.D., CT
    Posts
    141

    Default

    Okay, now I'm curious.

    Why is the orange Ferno stokes basket unsuitable for high-angle uses?

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    The Ferno model 71 or "stokes basket" is made from plastic with a metal frame rivited to the top only. It is rated for 600lbs (per Ferno)
    That rating would give you a 2:1 safety for a 300 lb pt. As the stokes gets older the plastic weakens. Their is a possibility that the top rail could break free from the rest of the stokes. An older one we owned begain to crack betwen the handles.
    It is good for slope evacuation and going over rough ground, it just isn't strong enough to take a chance in a vertical rescue.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Posts
    245

    Default

    Originally posted by Stuart
    Okay, now I'm curious.

    Why is the orange Ferno stokes basket unsuitable for high-angle uses?
    Plain and simple. The bottom has been known to fall out.

    One type of stokes I personaly like is the Skedco Sked Stretcher. It's not much more than an expensive deer sled. The weakest component is the slings and beaners. Those have a 9000 lbs break strength when used horizontally. The rating of the slings drop to around 5200 lbs when used vertacaly.

    These also work great for confined space applications.

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    The SKED is ok. You need to practice with it a lot because it is a bit of a pain to use. Another device that is nice is the REEVES sleeve. It is like an adult sized ped board, and can be used for vertical rescue, and is helo hoist compatable.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts