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  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Deadly Tornadoes- Kansas & Missouri

    PIERCE CITY, Mo. (AP) - A series of tornadoes pummeled Kansas
    and Missouri on Sunday, killing as many as 27 people as the
    twisters left a swath of destruction a quarter-mile wide in some
    places.
    Lawrence County, Mo., Sheriff Doug Seneker estimated a dozen
    people were killed when the tornado entered the southwest corner of
    the county about 6:25 p.m. and traveled northeast for more than 30
    minutes, exiting the county near Marionville.
    The worst damage appeared to be in Pierce City, where about nine
    people were missing and feared dead inside a National Guard Armory
    downtown where they had taken shelter. A Pierce City police officer
    described the downtown area as "wiped out," Seneker said.
    Searchers accompanied by dogs were digging through the armory
    debris in hopes of finding the missing victims alive, but the
    brick-and-wood structure was unstable and the process was going
    slowly.
    "They're hearing no signs of life, but they are still working
    to find them," said State Rep. Jack Goodman, R-Mount Vernon. He
    grew up in Pierce City and was in town when the storm hit.
    Residents in the town had gone to the armory in search of
    shelter as the weather worsened. When they realized the tornado was
    headed their way, they attempted to make it into the basement,
    Goodman said.
    "Apparently there was a bottleneck at the top of the stairs
    going to the basement that was so bad that few, if any, made it
    down there," he said.
    Lt. Dean Lyon of the Lawrence County Sheriff's Office said power
    remained out across most of the county late Sunday night,
    complicating search-and-rescue efforts.
    "We've been informed by the electric company that they've shut
    down the grid," Lyon said. "Basically, the main power lines were
    damaged severely."
    There was not a home or business in the town of nearly 1,400
    residents untouched by the tornado. Trees were twisted, power lines
    were downed, and brick, glass and other debris made it impossible
    to walk the city streets.
    Many of the downtown buildings built in the 1870s were reduced
    to rubble.
    In nearby Christian and Greene counties, two women were reported
    dead, said Dave Brown, an investigator for the Greene County
    Medical Examiner's Office. One of the women was killed near
    Battlefield in Christian County and the other in rural Greene
    County.
    Two more people were killed in Camden County, about 70 miles
    northeast of Lawrence County, the Camden County Sheriff's
    Department said.
    In Carl Junction, Mo., about two miles northwest of Joplin, two
    people were killed by a twister there, said officer Tiffany Sparks
    with the Jasper County Sheriff's Office.
    In Barton County, Mo., one person was killed when a tornado
    struck west of Liberal, Mo., officials there confirmed.
    In Kansas, eight people were reported dead.
    Col. Joy Moser of the state's emergency management office, said
    four deaths were reported in Girard and Franklin in Crawford County
    and one person was killed in Wyandotte County in the Kansas City
    area.
    The Cherokee County, Kan., sheriff's office confirmed three
    people there were killed when a tornado hit south of Columbus
    around 6 p.m. One death occurred when a mobile home was destroyed
    about three miles south of Columbus. The other two were in a house
    that was destroyed near Crestline, officials said.
    None of the victims' names were immediately available pending
    notification of relatives.
    Moser said reports indicated damage to more than 100 buildings
    in each Crawford and Wyandotte counties.
    Ten National Guard troops were on duty late Sunday in Crawford
    County at the request of county officials. The troops are expected
    to remain there for 24 hours.
    In Mulberry, Kan., about 10 miles north of Pittsburg in Crawford
    County, Richard Mapes told The (Pittsburg) Morning Sun newspaper he
    watched the tornado touch down two blocks from his house.
    Mapes said he saw trees shredded and the top story taken off a
    house in the neighboring town of Franklin. "It was bad," he said.
    At Girard Hospital, 11 miles northwest of Pittsburg, hospital
    officials said they treated five injured people. Two were seriously
    injured.
    Maj. Gen. Greg Gardner, the state director of emergency
    management, said state officials knew of four tornadoes that
    touched down in the state: one each in Leavenworth, Wyandotte,
    Miami and Crawford counties. He did not have an immediate damage
    estimate.
    Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius declared seven counties disaster
    areas: Cherokee, Crawford, Labette and Neosho counties in southeast
    Kansas, and Leavenworth, Miami and Wyandotte counties in northeast
    Kansas.
    "My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been touched
    by this disaster, especially those who have lost loved ones,"
    Sebelius said. "We will work together to help our communities to
    assess the damage and then rebuild and recover."
    Missouri Gov. Bob Holden said the process was under way to
    declare disaster areas in his state.
    A tornado first touched down west of Bonner Springs in Wyandotte
    County, Kan., around 3:30 p.m., said Lynn Maximuk, a meteorologist
    with the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill, Mo.
    It moved through Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties and into
    Platte and Clay counties in Missouri. The tornado reached 500 yards
    across at its widest, Maximuk said. It finally died out shortly
    before 6:30 p.m. in Ray County, Mo., northeast of Kansas City,
    meteorologist Lisa Schmit said.
    Holden on Sunday night toured Northmoor, a small town in Platte
    County, Mo., where between 25 and 30 homes were either damaged or
    destroyed. The town's city hall and police station also were
    damaged.
    Huge trees were uprooted, power lines were down everywhere and
    there was roof damage to several homes. In some cases, entire sides
    of homes were ripped away and all of the windows were blown out.
    Missouri officials told the National Guard to be ready to go to
    storm-damaged areas. Holden said the damage was "the worst I've
    seen from a tornado in several years."
    Charles Tholl, who lives in the area the governor toured, was
    with his girlfriend, Tammy Callendar, and five children. He was
    standing outside on the porch watching the storm when he suddenly
    saw the tornado coming over a hill.
    The adults took the children in a closet under a stairwell.
    Tholl said he was looking out through a door when suddenly, "I
    had to hold on with all my strength. It was scary. It felt like the
    house was twirling."
    At Kansas City, Mo. International Airport, officials stopped all
    flights and evacuated the terminals. Passengers were ushered into
    underground tunnels leading to parking garages. After about 30
    minutes, the passengers were allowed to leave and the airport was
    reopened.
    Kansas City Power and Light reported 33,000 customers without
    power at the height of the outage. About 5,000 customers remained
    without power Sunday evening.
    The storm tore a wide swath through Gladstone, Mo., damaging
    roofs, shattering windows and destroying business signage -
    including a large aluminum sign that was bent in half and draped
    high up over a power line.
    Officials at Providence Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan.,
    said they treated 22 people injured by a tornado that hit
    metropolitan Kansas City about 3:30 p.m. Only one person, who
    complained of chest pains, was admitted, said hospital spokeswoman
    Catherine Rice. Most of the others were treated for minor cuts and
    abrasions, she said.
    Cars and trucks were tossed into a ravine full of splintered
    trees in Kansas City, Kan., and several houses were knocked off
    their foundations.
    Jodee Nirschl, whose house is directly across from the ravine,
    said windows were blown out and a chunk of the second floor was
    missing.
    "My daughter's room is gone, but she's OK," Nirschl said, her
    voice breaking and tears coming to her eyes. "As long as I have my
    kids and my husband, I'll be OK."
    Shelters were set up at a middle school and a church in
    Wyandotte County for people displaced by the storm.
    In Kansas City, Kan., there was damage near Kansas Speedway and
    the Cabela's outdoor store, but neither the store nor the racetrack
    appeared to be damaged.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com


  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Update

    PIERCE CITY, Mo. (AP) - A series of tornadoes and high winds
    pummeled the Midwest on Sunday, killing an estimated 28 people in
    three states as storms left a swath of destruction a quarter-mile
    wide in some places.
    In Missouri, Lawrence County Sheriff Doug Seneker estimated a
    dozen people were killed when a tornado careened through the
    southwest part of the state.
    Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius declared seven counties disaster
    areas, and Missouri Gov. Bob Holden said the process was under way
    to declare disaster areas in his state.
    Missouri officials told the National Guard to be ready to go to
    storm-damaged areas. Holden said the damage was "the worst I've
    seen from a tornado in several years."
    One of the hardest hit areas appeared to be Pierce City, where
    about nine people were missing and feared dead inside a destroyed
    National Guard Armory where they had taken shelter. A Pierce City
    police officer described the downtown area as "wiped out,"
    Seneker said.
    Searchers accompanied by dogs were digging through the armory
    debris in hopes of finding the missing victims alive, but the
    brick-and-wood structure was unstable and the process was going
    slowly.
    "They're hearing no signsf life, but they are still working
    to find them," said state Rep. Jack Goodman. He grew up in Pierce
    City and was in town when the storm hit.
    There was not a home or business in the town of nearly 1,400
    residents untouched by the tornado. Trees were twisted, power lines
    were downed, and brick, glass and other debris made it impossible
    to walk the city streets.
    Two women were reported dead in nearby Greene and Christian
    counties, said Dave Brown, an investigator for the Greene County
    Medical Examiner's Office. One of the women was killed near
    Battlefield in Christian County and the other in rural Greene
    County.
    Two more people were killed in Camden County, about 70 miles
    northeast of Lawrence County, the Camden County Sheriff's
    Department said. In Barton County, one person was killed when a
    tornado struck west of Liberal, officials there confirmed.
    In Carl Junction, about two miles northwest of Joplin, two
    people were killed by a twister there, said officer Tiffany Sparks
    with the Jasper County Sheriff's Office.
    In Kansas, eight people were reported dead. Col. Joy Moser of
    the state's emergency management office, said four deaths were
    reported in Girard and Franklin in Crawford County and one person
    was killed in Wyandotte County in the Kansas City area.
    The Cherokee County, Kan., sheriff's office confirmed three
    people were killed when a tornado hit south of Columbus. One death
    occurred when a mobile home was destroyed; the other two were in a
    house that was destroyed near Crestline, officials said.
    One person also died in Tennessee's Dyer County.
    At Kansas City, Mo. International Airport, officials stopped all
    flights and evacuated the terminals. Passengers were ushered into
    underground tunnels leading to parking garages. After about 30
    minutes, the passengers were allowed to leave and the airport was
    reopened.
    Holden toured Northmoor, a small town in Platte County, Mo.,
    where between 25 and 30 homes were either damaged or destroyed. The
    town's city hall and police station also were damaged.
    "I had to hold on with all my strength," said resident Charles
    Tholl, who was with his girlfriend and five children when the storm
    hit. "It was scary. It felt like the house was twirling."
    The tornadoes were part of a large storm system that hit the
    Midwest, spawning twisters in South Dakota and Nebraska as well.
    Cars and trucks were tossed into a ravine full of splintered
    trees in Kansas City, Kan., and several houses were knocked off
    their foundations.
    Jodee Nirschl, whose house is directly across from the ravine,
    said windows were blown out and a chunk of the second floor was
    missing.
    "My daughter's room is gone, but she's OK," Nirschl said, her
    voice breaking and tears coming to her eyes. "As long as I have my
    kids and my husband, I'll be OK."
    In Tennessee, a resident of Barkers Trailer Park in Dyersburg
    died during the storm, said Tennessee Emergency Management Agency
    spokesman Kurt Pickering. High winds flipped several of the park's
    mobile homes.
    Storms earlier unleashed tornadoes in Nebraska, dumping rain and
    some hail over most of the drought-parched state. South Dakota
    authorities also reported tornadoes.
    "We got smacked," said Herb Johnston, who lives east of
    Minatare, Neb. "We lost a shed and windows in the house, and I
    think we've got half the cornfield in the house now."
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Weather Service: http://iwin.nws.noaa.gov
    Intellicast: http://www.intellicast.com
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  3. #3
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post More...

    PIERCE CITY, Mo. (AP) - Searchers using dogs and heavy equipment
    went from one crumbled home to another Monday after tornado-packed
    storms flattened communities in four Midwestern states and killed
    at least 38 people. Ten people were missing, including eight in
    this southwestern Missouri town.
    It was "the most devastating series of tornadoes we've ever had
    in the state of Missouri," Gov. Bob Holden said after walking the
    rubble-strewn streets of Pierce City.
    The storms were blamed for at least 18 deaths in Missouri, seven
    in Kansas and 13 in Tennessee, where a single tornado carved a
    65-mile path of destruction. The storms also brought hail and heavy
    rain; three of the victims drowned trying to drive on a flooded
    road near Nashville, Tenn.
    "It's worse than a nightmare," said Stacy Silverwood, whose
    grandparents were killed by a twister that blew part of their
    Camden County, Mo., house down a hill and into a pond a half-mile
    away.
    The storms were part of a huge weather system that also spawned
    twisters Sunday and early Monday in Arkansas, Mississippi,
    Kentucky, South Dakota and Nebraska. The National Weather Service
    posted new tornado warnings in Kentucky and Tennessee as the storm
    system moved eastward.
    One of the hardest hit areas was Madison County, Tenn., where 10
    people were killed. Rescue crews with cadaver dogs were searching a
    small lake for a father and son who were missing.
    In Jackson, the county seat, streets were blocked by fallen
    trees, twisted sheets of metal, power lines and bricks. Officials
    said at least 70 homes east of downtown Jackson were destroyed and
    streets were littered with snapped trees and utility poles.
    Among the survivors in Jackson was retiree T.E. White, 69, who
    huddled in a closet with his three young grandchildren while a
    tornado ripped off the front porch and part of his roof.
    "I didn't have time to be scared," White said. "When I came
    out and saw what happened, then I got scared."
    In Pierce City, where Sunday's storms killed two people and
    struck nearly every home and business in the town of 1,400, Mayor
    Mark Peters said tornado warning sirens sounded in advance.
    A hand-scrawled list on the door of City Hall listed eight
    townspeople as "possibly missing," but town officials were
    hopeful they would be found alive.
    Several other names had been marked through, replaced by
    reassuring entries about those people's whereabouts.
    Officials initially feared the missing were dead in the rubble
    of the National Guard Armory, where several townspeople took
    shelter as the storm approached. One body was found in the building
    during the night.
    But after searchers accompanied by dogs dug through the debris,
    regional emergency official Glenn Dittmar said he was nearly
    certain no one else would be found in the armory.
    Many residents checked on their neighbors and hugged when they
    found each other.
    Richard and Darlene Young had been talking about having a tree
    removed from their front yard in Pierce City when the storm struck.
    "Me and the wife and the little dog got in the bedroom closet,"
    Richard Young said.
    When the Youngs emerged, they found that tree was unharmed, but
    it had been joined in their yard by the bell tower from the
    neighboring First Congregational Church.
    In Jackson, a tornado warning was issued 22 minutes before the
    twister hit. That gave lawyer Joe Byrd and law clerk Jen Free
    plenty of time to get from his office to a concrete storage area in
    the basement.
    "It's like downtown Baghdad," Byrd said of the destruction he
    found when they emerged from the shelter. Free, 24, said she ran to
    a nearby hotel to help get the elderly out of their apartments.
    "I was knocking on doors, yelling to everyone they needed to
    get out," Free said. "They were walking down the stairs holding
    hands and being amazingly calm."
    In Kansas, 80 homes were damaged or destroyed in Crawford
    County, at least 20 of them in the Franklin area.
    "It wiped out a third of the town, I hate to say it," said
    Edlon Bedene, the county emergency management director. "The trees
    are like somebody came in and cut them off 10 feet above the
    ground."
    President Bush, visiting Little Rock, Ark., said the government
    would move as quickly as possible to help the storm-damaged areas.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  4. #4
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Unhappy Summary

    Details on storm system that slashed across Midwest, South:

    MISSOURI:
    At least 18 dead, eight missing. Red Cross estimates 100 homes
    destroyed or badly damaged in Pierce City, town of 1,400.

    KANSAS:
    At least seven dead, 50 people injured. Gov. Kathleen Sebelius
    declares seven counties disaster areas.

    TENNESSEE:
    At least 13 dead, two missing. Eleven deaths reported in Madison
    County, where tornado carves 65-mile path of destruction.

    ARKANSAS:
    Tornadoes hit mostly rural areas of central and east-central
    Arkansas, destroying several homes. No deaths or serious injuries
    reported.

    SOUTH DAKOTA:
    At least three tornado touchdowns reported. Hail as big as
    baseballs reported in Mellette County.

    NEBRASKA:
    Scattered damage from several tornadoes in rural parts of state.
    Hail as big as softballs damaged homes and cars near Offutt Air
    Force Base, outside Omaha.

    KENTUCKY:
    Thunderstorms struck Louisville during Monday morning rush hour,
    some 24,000 homes and businesses lost power. Tornado injures one
    person.

    MISSISSIPPI:
    Several homes damaged by tornado early Monday in rural northern
    part of state. No injuries reported.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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