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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ;615954
    For both military and civilian firefighters the Air Force takes firefighting much more seriously than the other branches,
    First being a former Damage Control (Firefighter) in the Navy, I would say that each branch and every FF takes firefighting just as serious as the next person. The Navy has had some very serious shipboard fires and FF is taken very serious. everyone in the Navy gets the basics of FF at bootcamp and must get DC qualified everytime when getting to a ship. Also Navy (shipboard) FF is also more aggressive, there is no surround and drown or defensive mode.

    Reading through these post I agree with what many have said. If you really want the best training out there in the military that will reflect with civilian FF, then go Air Force. You get crash rescue as well as structural FF with the AF. Also you receive IFSTA certifications, which DO reflect for certifications in many states.


  2. #22
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    The submarine fleet in the navy does not have any dedicated ff's. everyone is a firefighter, and who suits up and does attack is dependant on which watch section is oncoming or offgoing. on to the training. Navy fire training is completly different from civilian structrual ff. The Vol Dept I was in while I wasin the Navy always asked the new guys, "Do you have any experience" and they would answer "The Navy" so the next question was "Ok, any REAL experience?" About the only thing I could tell ya is to go navy corpsman, and get certified as an EMT and move up and eventually get your medic, but make sure you get NR certified and state ceritifed other wise when you get out it will mean nothing. Get the medical experience. I cannot compare any shipboard experience to structural experience.

  3. #23
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    I think you need to consider what is going on in the world right now. All the army fire fighters I know are going to Iraq and they are looking for more fire fighters. My fire I instructor is going to Baghdad. Yeah they get paid over $100,000 a year, but you have to worry about taking a bullet in the back. Right now, if I were you, I would go into the Air Force...you might not see as much action, but you will be at a lot less danger. But if you're only 16 and have to wait until you're 21...hopefully we won't still be in Iraq by then.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveCN5 View Post
    But if you're only 16 and have to wait until you're 21...hopefully we won't still be in Iraq by then.
    Last I checked, the enlistment age was 18 for active duty, or 17 for Reserve/Guard with parent's permission to do Split-Op...

    Of course, I'm not a recruiter, I just used to help moderate the Joining the Military forums on military.com for a year.
    My opinions might coincide with someone of importance's POV... I wouldn't know, since I never bothered to ask. My policy is: "Don't ask, don't care."

    IACOJ--West Coast PITA

  5. #25

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    Default just enlisted DC having doubts

    Quote Originally Posted by jccrabby3084 View Post
    First being a former Damage Control (Firefighter) in the Navy, I would say that each branch and every FF takes firefighting just as serious as the next person. The Navy has had some very serious shipboard fires and FF is taken very serious. everyone in the Navy gets the basics of FF at bootcamp and must get DC qualified everytime when getting to a ship. Also Navy (shipboard) FF is also more aggressive, there is no surround and drown or defensive mode.

    Reading through these post I agree with what many have said. If you really want the best training out there in the military that will reflect with civilian FF, then go Air Force. You get crash rescue as well as structural FF with the AF. Also you receive IFSTA certifications, which DO reflect for certifications in many states.
    Hi I just enlisted as a DC. I am a volunteer and I am 19 years old. I was told that this is the only "fire fighting" job the navy has and now as I am researching it seems that it is not at all what my recruiter made it out to be. I was wondering if while I am in the Navy I will have time to still get the rest of my fire certs. on my own (another thing he told me). My ship date is october 10th and I thought that I had to go. After talking to multiple people they have told me that If I changed my mind about going I did not have to go because I am only enlisted in the delayed entry program. I am just looking for any advice so if anyone has any suggestions I would really appreciate it. Thank you

  6. #26
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    I was a DC in the Navy and now am a Firefighter in Norfolk VA. Its like one guy said above. It is very shipboard specific. I dont think it related at all. I was in for 6 years and didnt do any actual firefighting. Just chased around flags and acted like a fireman. I think the military experience was great. If you havent enlisted and are just in DEP, than you should be able to cange if you want. If I had to do it all over again. Air Force is the way to go. I would say that is the closest relation. If you stay Navy you can always get your EMT off duty. It was hard for me to get any fire classes being on sea duty. Whatever you do, have a good time, get all you can from the military and try to get a dept when your time is up.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveCN5 View Post
    I think you need to consider what is going on in the world right now. All the army fire fighters I know are going to Iraq and they are looking for more fire fighters. My fire I instructor is going to Baghdad. Yeah they get paid over $100,000 a year, but you have to worry about taking a bullet in the back. Right now, if I were you, I would go into the Air Force...you might not see as much action, but you will be at a lot less danger. But if you're only 16 and have to wait until you're 21...hopefully we won't still be in Iraq by then.

    Are you talking about David 2E? If you are he made it out here and he's now the AC at a smaller base in Al Hillah.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcaldwell View Post
    Yup, I would have to agree that the Navy is your best bet. They usually have dedicated firefighter crews on all ships with air ops (helicoptors, etc.). Plus you travel a lot more.

    My little brother is in the Canadian Navy, and he recently completed a posting as a Fire Instructor at the Naval Fire School in Esquimalt (Victoria, BC). You want to see a nice facility! Right up there with the best structural fire schools, and he had an absolute blast doing it(no pun intended). He says the American Naval Fire Program is very similar.
    Actually Marty you are 1/2 right. The navy does have personnel who are trainined in shipboard firefighting - we all are, as ships company. However the only "dedicated" firefighters onboard are the Air Force 651 MOC Firefighters. They come on when the helo det is boarded and leave when the Air Det leaves. Otherwise primary shipboard FF is done by the Engineering staff, backed up with the rest of us logistic, combat systems and bos'uns types.

    AND Yes, the Esquimalt facility is great. Although the last time I did full refresher training was in the old set up, I've seen the new one. Very nice indeed.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

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    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dfree88 View Post
    Hi I just enlisted as a DC. I am a volunteer and I am 19 years old. I was told that this is the only "fire fighting" job the navy has and now as I am researching it seems that it is not at all what my recruiter made it out to be. I was wondering if while I am in the Navy I will have time to still get the rest of my fire certs. on my own (another thing he told me). My ship date is october 10th and I thought that I had to go. After talking to multiple people they have told me that If I changed my mind about going I did not have to go because I am only enlisted in the delayed entry program. I am just looking for any advice so if anyone has any suggestions I would really appreciate it. Thank you

    When it comes to FF in the Navy, DC really is the only rate dedicated to it. There is crash rescue FF on carriers and they are comprised of flight deck personnel. On smaller ships DC personnel are the ones responsible. Like Malahat stated everyone is a FF in the Navy.

    A recruiter for the most part will say anything and if the recruiter only knows the information from a book about a job, they really don't have a clue. Sort of like if your recruiter is a radar reader, they don't have all the details what a jet engine mechanic does. They know basics and that is it. So a recruiter saying you can get your fire certs while in is blowing smoke. There is a possibility to get on a volunteer dept while in, but with the ship deployments and such, you are not in port long enough to really do much. EMT is possible to get though, but does depend on ship movement.

    The comments jmsergi said are true as well. The experience you get as DC makes you more ready to be a fire engineer taking care of suppression systems, than FF. Although there have been a lot of experiences from DC I use all the time. For one, DC ARE the FIRE personnel on the ship. DC teach FF tactics, repair equipment, conduct drills, and are usually the ones in charge of an emergency scene. Fires do happen onboard, few and far between, but things do happen and it is DC's responsibilty to ensure everyone else knows their job. As a DC you are typically like an incident commander during drills and actual emergencies. Also DC are utilized in key areas of firefighting as well. IC, Team Leader (company officer inside the fire space), and younger DC are typically on the nozzle or doing key tasks.
    Going DC will NOT make you a FF as a civilian, but you do get a lot of experience and consistent training. DC also take care of chemical warfare (HazMat) and flood control, pumping, shoring, confined space, etc and on some ships, even high angle rescue. All skills that translate nicely on a resume.

    Here is one thing to truly remember. Military experience is VERY appealing to a fire dept. Typically a veteran has discipline, technical skills, attention to detail, and works with a chain of command. Basically a 22y/o military vet would possibly be considered more mature than a 22y/o kid right out of school and never held a job. There have been many military vets who never had any real type of firefighting experience while in the service who are on fire departments today. You may still have to go to school when you get out, but you military benefits make that easy. In fact most vets make money going to school because of their benefits.

    The way I look at it, find out what you really can about DC, also look at what the other branches have to offer. The military can be a great experience. One thing about the Navy is it is hard to put a ship on the sand. You may not get great port calls all the time, but comfort level on a ship vs in the sandbox is better. Then again, you may get on a ship going to Europe, Asia or Australia. While there are days I look back and think had I just went to school I could have been a career FF sooner, yet there is much I learned in the service and experiencing other countries I would never have gotten if I didn't go in.

    Simply put, at 19, a four year stint, out at 23, two years of college for FF, could be on the job at 25. Really not all that bad of time to get a career. As for being in DEP and looking at other branches etc, I would suggest looking into www.military.com Also while you are in you can work on college level classes and get credits dirt cheap. All those do transfer over and a two year degree can be done a lot sooner, and it is even possible to get an associates degree in general studies while in. So when you would get out you may only have to take a few fire courses and get an A.S. in Fire Protection.

    It can be a good place to ask questions about things like this. I do believe though, being in DEP, you already signed a contract so remember to take that into account, especially if they guaranteed you a rating.
    Last edited by jccrabby3084; 07-16-2007 at 05:45 PM.

  10. #30
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    You may not get great port calls all the time, but comfort level on a ship vs in the sandbox is better
    Simply put, three square meals, and a dry warm bunk every day/night beats the he!! out of "camping with the Army" any day! I have 5 years experience with both and I'll take doing donuts in the water on Officer of the Watch Manouevers over digging holes in the Middle of No-Where any day.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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