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  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post The State of Oregon

    EUGENE, Ore. (AP) - A cool, wet spring is expected to delay the
    fire season in much of Oregon, but dry forests and rangelands east
    of the Cascades should keep firefighters hopping.
    "We are going to have quite a few fires and some big fires,
    especially east of the Cascades," said Paul Werth, fire weather
    program manager for the federal Northwest Interagency Coordination
    Center in Portland.
    "It's going to be an active fire season again, but not with the
    huge size of fires we had last year," he said.
    Werth said one of the busier seasons will be in central Oregon,
    which lost 20 homes to forest fire last year.
    "They've had four consecutive years of low snowpacks, so
    drought conditions are still continuing east of the Cascades,"
    Werth said.
    Oregon and Washington average about 4,000 wildfires a year. A
    million acres burned and 25 homes were destroyed in Oregon in 2002,
    making it one of the costliest seasons in state history.
    Most wildfires start from lightning, the most unpredictable
    factor in sizing up how severe the season will turn out, said Mike
    Ziolko, meteorology manager for the state Department of Forestry in
    Salem.
    "If we have little dry lightning, the fire season probably
    would be pretty minimal," Ziolko said. "But if we get lots of dry
    lightning storms, we could get into the problems we had last summer
    east of the Cascades."
    But a wet spring should help Lane, Coos and Douglas counties,
    and the fire risk also is lower in southwestern Oregon, where last
    year's Biscuit fire scorched more than 499,000 acres in the
    Siskiyou National Forest.
    "That has been a big benefit and certainly will mitigate an
    active fire season west of the Cascades," Werth said.
    A wet spring, however, can also spur a growth in grasses that,
    once dried out, do more to feed the spread of fire. While Werth
    doesn't see that as a huge problem this year, a state forestry
    official in Veneta is concerned.
    "With all this moisture, things have really taken off and
    grown," said Craig Mackey, forest unit supervisor for the agency's
    Western Lane District. "No pun intended, but now there's more fuel
    for the fire."


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  2. #2
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    Post Season begins

    GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) - Oregon's first wildfire of the year is
    burning in the Cheney Creek Drainage about six miles southwest of
    Grants Pass.
    Crews first responded to the fire late Tuesday. It has burned
    about 30 acres in a 150-acre perimeter.
    A bulldozer line has been completed around the fire, which is
    not threatening any homes. About 80 firefighters, four engines and
    three privately owned bulldozers are fighting it.
    The cause has not been determined.
    While the fire season has not officially begun, Dennis Turco,
    fire prevention specialist for Oregon Department of Forestry, said
    the blaze is proof that some vegetation in Oregon is already dry
    enough to burn.


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  3. #3
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    Post Origin determined

    GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) - Exhaust from a chainsaw ignited the
    first wildfire of the season in Oregon six miles southwest of
    Grants Pass, state forestry officials said Thursday.
    The 47-acre fire, which started Wednesday, was contained
    overnight and crews worked Thursday to put out hot spots.
    Burn patterns led investigators to a freshly cut stump covered
    with moss that apparently caught fire, said Dennis Turco of the
    Oregon Department of Forestry. He said the state may be able to
    recover firefighting costs from the person or company who started
    the blaze.
    No one was injured and no homes were damaged.


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  4. #4
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    Default

    Well, here in my suburban department, we've already started our brush/grass fire season. Some heavy fuel has burned too, which is a bit surprising because of the amount of rain we've had recently. Word I've gotten is eastern Oregon is already looking pretty dry....
    "The more we sweat in training, the less we bleed in battle."

  5. #5
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    Post Fuel Moisture Down

    Dry downed logs pose special fire threat.

    (Bend-AP) - A cool, wet spring in Central Oregon aside, fire
    officials say large downed logs are as dry now as they typically
    are in August.
    Such logs in the region remain parched after several years of
    drought.
    Kelly Jerzykowski, manager at Central Oregon Interagency
    Dispatch, says that means fires could ignite more easily and burn
    hotter through those fuels.
    So fire season has been declared started in that region.
    People will need burning permits on all private forest lands
    protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry in Crook, Deschutes
    and Jefferson counties.
    Typically the amount of water within those logs is about 17 to
    18 percent this time of year. But he said the average moisture
    content around the central Oregon region is about 12 percent.
    The wet spring did little to improve the amount of snow water on
    the ground.

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  6. #6
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    Post June 5, 2003

    Two wildfires reported in Oregon

    (Portland-AP) -- Two forest fires are burning in Oregon, one
    near Falls City and one at the western edge of Crater Lake National
    Park.
    The Northwest Interagency Coordination Centers says the Falls
    City fire was on land owned by Boise Corporation and appeared to be
    from an escaped slash burn.
    Rod Nichols of the Oregon Department of Forestry says the fire
    began yesterday about six miles southwest of Falls City.
    He says is expected to reach about 225 acres before it is
    contained.
    Nichols says no structures are threatened and that Boise
    Corporations and O-D-F firefighters are battling it.
    Officials say the Crater Lake blaze was started by a lightning
    fire about five days ago and is only about five acres.

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  7. #7
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    Post July 8th

    SISTERS, Ore. (AP) - A fire in central Oregon jumped firelines
    on its east side overnight and was fueled by high winds as it moved
    toward stands of highly flammable dead timber, fire officials said
    Tuesday.
    The Link fire had burned more than 830 acres and was 50 percent
    contained, said David Widmark, spokesman for the Northwest
    Interagency Coordination Center.
    According to the Oregon Department of Forestry, higher humidity
    and partly cloudy skies limited fire growth to the south and
    southwest flanks. It was not advancing as of 4 p.m. Tuesday.
    Camping areas at Camp Tamarack and Scout Lake have been closed,
    in addition to recreation areas in Meadow Lakes basin. No other
    evacuations were planned, Widmark said.
    In southern Oregon, the Powell Creek fire grew to 350 acres, but
    crews completed a fire line around its perimeter by 6 a.m. Tuesday.
    The blaze, first reported Monday afternoon, spread quickly and
    caused the evacuation of 30 homes near Williams.
    The blaze burned within 100 yards of some homes, but most
    residents were allowed to return by Tuesday morning, said Assistant
    Fire Chief Roger Fogg.
    The fire was about 10 percent contained Tuesday afternoon, the
    state forestry department said.
    Chief Steve Scruggs of Williams Fire and Rescue said the fire
    was not caused by lightning, and officials were investigating
    possible causes. About 350 firefighters, four helicopters and eight
    engines were on the fire.
    Elsewhere in Oregon, fire officials were keeping a close eye on
    thunderstorms and lightning moving across southern part of the
    state and east of the Cascades.
    Lightning struck more than 2,300 times south and east of the
    Link fire, in central Oregon, overnight, Widmark said.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Coordination Center:
    http://www.nifc.gov/fireinfo/nfn.html
    Northwest Interagency Coordination Center:
    http://www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/

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  8. #8
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    Post July 14th

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - A 500-acre brush fire threatened several
    homes about 20 miles east of Eugene on Monday, but firefighters
    were able to contain a 3,225-acre blaze just outside the Black
    Butte resort community.
    Five residences and 10 outbuildings were threatened by the Clark
    Fire, said David Widmark of the Northwest Interagency Coordination
    Center.
    Residents of those homes were not told to leave as of Monday
    afternoon. But the fire forced the evacuation of Bedrock and Clark
    Creek campgrounds.
    Three air tankers, 77 firefighters and 10 fire engines from the
    Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry and rural fire
    districts were deployed to the fire, which was first reported by
    campground hosts on Sunday. Additional crews were summoned to help,
    officials said.
    Fourteen campers and eight camp counselors from the Solid Rock
    Four Square youth church group in Post Falls, Idaho, evacuated
    their campsite at Clark Creek.
    Counselor Debbie Hunt said she and the other counselors hastily
    rounded up the campers, many of whom had been swimming nearby, and
    left the campground immediately, leaving most of their belongings.
    "We just got them out as quickly as we could," she said.
    The cause of the fire was under investigation and there was no
    estimate of containment, officials said.
    Elsewhere in Oregon, a fire near John Day burned 800 acres, and
    had spread from Oregon Department of Forestry land into the Malheur
    National Forest, officials said.
    "This fire is burning hot and is slow moving through some
    really inaccessible areas," Widmark said.
    Nearly 300 firefighters were battling the blaze, dubbed the
    Jenkins Cabin Fire, which threatened three buildings.
    The cause of the fire, which was 20 percent contained early
    Monday, was under investigation.
    Firefighters had success late Sunday when they contained the
    Link Fire near Sisters, which had burned an estimated 3,225 acres.
    The fire had burned to within 3Ĺ miles of the Black Butte Ranch
    resort community by Saturday before stopping at the fire line.

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  9. #9
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    Post July 17th

    Crews continue to fight Oregon fires

    (Portland-AP) -- Officials say a wildfire burning 20 miles east
    of Eugene is slowly advancing to the north. The Clark Fire is now
    14-hundred acres and ten percent contained.
    Twenty-two crews, three helicopters, two air tankers, three
    bulldozers and eight fire engines are working on the blaze. As of
    this morning, the effort is being led jointly by the state and
    federal forest agencies.
    Near John Day, the Jenkins Cabin Fire is about 770 acres and 95
    percent contained. It's expected to be fully contained by 7 p-m
    tonight.
    Meanwhile, crews are working to restore the site of the Link
    Fire near Sisters.
    Rehabilitation efforts will include installing water bars,
    moving branches and logs, and dragging back soil mounds.
    The 35-hundred acre fire is not fully extinguished. A few hot
    spots remain in and around the blaze.

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  10. #10
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    Post 7/20

    EUGENE, Ore. (AP) - The Clark Fire near Eugene grew to 2,100
    acres Sunday, and has so far cost $3.6 million to fight, according
    to fire information officials.
    Crews began burnout operations Sunday, and plan to continue them
    through the middle of this week, said fire information officer
    Bernie Pineda.
    About 1100 people are assigned to fight the fire, in additional
    to helicopters, bulldozers and 69 fire engines.
    In Southern Oregon, three fires were burning along Interstate 5
    south of Canyonville, covering about 75 acres in all. Tom Fields, a
    spokesman for the Douglas Forest Protective Association, said it
    appears that the fires were started by the exhaust from a vehicle.
    "We're getting some shade on the mountain, and the fire is
    laying down a bit," Fields said Sunday night. "We're continuing
    to work with three helicopters and air tanker retardent."
    Meanwhile, Oregon wildfire officials are concerned about a
    series of thunderstorms predicted to move across the southern and
    eastern portions of the state this week.
    "It is tinder dry out there, and we don't expect there to be
    sizable rain with those thunderstorms," said Mauragrace Healey, a
    spokeswoman for the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.
    East of Silverton, crews from the Oregon Department of Forestry
    were heading an effort to beat back an eight acre blaze, called the
    Abiqua Fire, that is burning in second growth timber and brush,
    Healey said.
    Two building had been threatened, she said, but fire crews had
    managed to put them out of danger for the time being.
    ---
    On the Net:
    Northwest Interagency Coordination Center, www.or.blm.gov/nwcc

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  11. #11
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    Post 7/21

    (Lowell-AP) -- The Clark fire has reached 22-hundred acres and
    is ten percent contained.
    About 11-hundred people, six helicopters, three bulldozers and
    69 fire engines are working on the wildfire burning 20 miles
    southeast of Eugene. They're focusing on burnouts to control the
    spread of the fire.
    State forestry officials say Sunday's burnouts were successful.
    More are planned for tonight.
    The Clark Fire has cost roughly three-point-six (m) million
    dollars to fight
    East of Silverton, the Abiqua (Ah-IH'-kwa) Fire is fully
    contained. The 97-acre blaze threatened two structures, which have
    now been secured.
    Crews are working on hot spots inside the fire line.
    Containment is also expected tonight on an 85-plus-acre wildfire
    burning south of Canyonville. The fire burning next to I-5 is 95
    percent contained.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    APTV 07-22-03 0038EDT
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    Post 7/23

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Fire crews and aerial tankers rushed to
    combat a fast-burning wildfire that erupted Wednesday afternoon in
    the Deschutes National Forest about five miles south of Bend.
    The blaze, called the 18 fire, was moving away from town
    Wednesday afternoon, but had exploded to burn 200 acres within a
    few hours of igniting, said Mauragrace Healey, spokeswoman for the
    Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.
    No structures were threatened, as afternoon winds were blowing
    the fire in a southeasterly direction away from town, she said.
    The cause of the fire was still under investigation, Healy said.
    In other fire news, the crews continued to wrestle with the
    3,200-acre Clark fire near Eugene, which was about 25 percent
    contained Wednesday.
    More than a thousand people were working on the blaze, plus 79
    fire engines, eight bulldozers and seven helicopters. The fire's
    cost so far is estimated at $5.1 million, according to the
    coordination center.
    Fire officials were bracing for more fires from dry lightning
    storms moving through central Oregon.
    Healey said there were 467 lightning strikes overnight Tuesday
    to Wednesday, sparking nine new fires. But crews stationed near
    where fires were predicted were able to contain all nine, she said.
    Fire officials said Wednesday that they are keeping a close eye
    on Central Oregon and the Pendleton area, where more storms are
    forecast.


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    Post 24th of July

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Fire crews working on a fast-burning
    wildfire near Bend raced hot, dry weather Thursday as they tried to
    coax the blaze away from a southeast subdivision.
    Dubbed the 18 Fire, it erupted in Deschutes National Forest
    Wednesday and quickly grew to 2,500 acres by Thursday afternoon.
    The blaze was 30 percent contained on Thursday afternoon,
    according to the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center.
    An evacuation plan is being prepared for nearby residents, but
    fire information officer Virginia Gibbons said there was no
    immediate threat to residents.
    Fire crews got some help Wednesday night, Gibbons said, when the
    fire turned south and bumped into an area where the Forest Service
    has been doing fuel reduction work, which may slow the fire's path.
    About 100 firefighters, 15 fire engines, four planes, three
    water tenders and two helicopters were battling the fire.
    The cause of the fire was still under investigation.
    "Today should be a make or break day for the fire," said David
    Widmark, a spokesman for the Northwest Interagency Coordination
    Center in Portland.
    Widmark said there were more than 8,000 dry lightning strikes
    across south-central Oregon overnight, centered in Klamath and Lake
    counties.
    Crews continued to wrestle with the 4,200-acre Clark fire near
    Eugene, which was about 30 percent contained Thursday. Fire
    officials expect to have the blaze fully contained by Wednesday.
    More than 1,000 people were working on the blaze, plus 79 fire
    engines, eight bulldozers and seven helicopters. The fire's cost so
    far is estimated at $5.1 million, according to the coordination
    center.
    Fire officials were bracing for more fires from dry lightning
    storms moving through central Oregon and the Pendleton area.
    On Wednesday night, there were more than 8,000 lightening
    strikes across south-central Oregon, starting 46 new fires in 600
    acres. All of those blazes have been extinguished.


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    Post 8/20

    EUGENE, Ore. (AP) - Highway 20 over Santiam Pass could remain
    closed for more than a week as the Booth fire in Central Oregon
    turned the roadway into a flame-lined alley.
    Heavy smoke from the blaze prevented air tankers from making
    retardant runs on the 3,000-acre fire and will keep President Bush
    from making a planned tour of the forest near Camp Sherman on
    Thursday.
    Another 3,000-acre fire, the Bear Butte fire, is burning in the
    Mount Jefferson Wilderness and Warm Springs Indian Reservation.
    The two fires are being managed together as the B and B Complex.
    No structures or campgrounds are threatened by the Bear Butte
    Fire, but more than 700 campers at almost a dozen campgrounds and
    retreats had to be evacuated from the path of the Booth Fire. None
    had been damaged as of late Wednesday, and city firefighters from
    Sisters, Redmond and Bend were stationed at Suttle Lake Resort and
    other areas.
    Bulldozers were being used to carve fire lines, but wind-borne
    embers were starting new blazes faster than crews could keep up.
    The fire was burning right to the edges of Highway 20.
    Flames erupted about 1 p.m. Tuesday on the north side of the
    highway about a mile east of Hoodoo Ski Area. The blaze initially
    burned east and jumped the road to the woods around Suttle and Blue
    lakes. It later reversed direction and crossed the Pacific Crest
    Trail and swung around Hogg Rock just west of the pass and north of
    the highway.
    Weather could give firefighters a break on both fires. The
    forecast calls for rain over the Cascades on Thursday night and
    Friday.
    The fire is burning in a patchwork of dense, insect-killed trees
    and open woods where the U.S. Forest Service has thinned trees and
    cleared brush as part of an effort to improve the forest's health.
    Incident commander Mike Benefield said large swaths of dead and
    downed timber remain north of the highway and are the biggest
    concern. If the fire gets into that area, he said, it will be hard
    to stop.
    "It's a real dangerous fire," he said from an observation
    point just east of the Santiam summit. "It's going to cover some
    ground before it's all done."
    Highway 20 remains closed at its junction with highways 20 and
    22. Eastbound cars are being diverted onto the narrow, twisting
    road that winds over the McKenzie Pass, known as Highway 242 or the
    Old McKenzie Highway.
    Westbound traffic is being turned back at Camp Sherman. Highway
    20 carries traffic from Salem, Albany and Eugene over the Cascades
    and is an important commercial link to Bend and points east.
    With the highway closed, larger vehicles such as freight trucks
    and large campers must divert either to Highway 26 through
    Government Camp or Highway 58 over Willamette Pass.

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    Post 8/21

    REDMOND, Ore. (AP) - Between 500 and 1,000 residents were told
    to leave their homes Thursday as complex of wildfires burned toward
    the central Oregon community of Camp Sherman.
    President Bush took an aerial tour of the fires aboard a Marine
    helicopter, but the thick smoke blocked the view and its acrid
    smell filled the cabin. He was scheduled to deliver an afternoon
    speech on forest policy at Camp Sherman, but the event was moved to
    Redmond because of the fires.
    The 4,000-acre fire complex in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness
    threw up a white-capped plume of smoke that towered over central
    Oregon. In addition to the Camp Sherman evacuations, residents of
    Black Butte Ranch, a resort community four miles from the fire,
    were told they might have to leave, and a 21-mile stretch of U.S.
    20 over the Cascades was closed.
    "It's a real dangerous fire," said incident commander Mike
    Benefield from an observation point east of the Santiam summit.
    "It's going to cover some ground before it's all done."
    The fires burned a youth camp Thursday but have apparently not
    damaged any homes yet. The camp had been evacuated earlier.
    The evacuation order issued Thursday affects about 400 homes,
    said Carol Connolly, spokeswoman with the Central Oregon
    Interagency Dispatch Center. More than 700 campers at campgrounds
    and retreats had left the area earlier.
    Several hundred firefighters are heading to the area to help the
    220 firefighters already at the scene, said David Widmark,
    spokesman for the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center. The
    cause of the fire wasn't immediately known.
    In Montana, about 150 families were poised to leave their homes
    in Lincoln because of two wildfires burning uncontrolled through
    surrounding forests. Fire crews worked Thursday morning to put
    protective foam on 120 homes that already were evacuated.
    About three dozen large fires are burning in Montana, and the
    military is being called upon as the situation worsens. About 500
    National Guardsmen were expected to begin working Thursday on fires
    west of Missoula, and another 100 were due to start work on the
    Lincoln fires by Monday, a fire spokesman said.
    The Defense Department said Thursday it planned to call in 560
    soldiers from Fort Hood, Texas, to help battle blazes in Montana.
    About 2.4 million acres have been charred so far this wildfire
    season, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. The hot
    spot now is in the Northern Rockies, but wildfires continue
    elsewhere in the West.
    In Wyoming, a new fire in the Shoshone National Forest southwest
    of Cody exploded from just 20 acres to 6,000 acres Wednesday, and
    increased to 10,000 acres by Thursday afternoon. A few dude ranches
    are in the area, but gusty winds pushed the fire away from the
    ranches and no evacuations were requested.
    The fire is one of several burning between Cody and Yellowstone
    National Park, but no structures are threatened. The park's east
    entrance remains closed because of fires next to the road, but the
    park's four other entrances were open and park facilities were not
    affected.
    A thunderstorm peppered northern Idaho with small fires late
    Wednesday as firefighters continue to dig suppression lines around
    several large blazes in the area. Fire officials issued a "red
    flag warning" that windy weather could fan those blazes even more.
    Wildfires covered more than 80,000 acres in Idaho, according to the
    National Interagency Fire Center.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
    Northern Rockies:
    http://www.fs.fed.us/r1/fire/2003fires/index.shtml
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  16. #16
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    Post June 20th, 2004

    SALEM, Ore. (AP) - Firefighters contained one of the first
    wildfires of the season near Dallas on Sunday, after it burned
    about 50 acres on a recently logged clearcut and in second-growth
    timber.
    The Fanno Ridge Fire was reported Friday evening on property
    owned by the Boise Cascade timber products company and the U.S.
    Bureau of Land Management. The cause is still under investigation.
    About 100 firefighters responded Saturday morning, said Jerry
    Piering, state forester in Dallas.
    "It was early in the season to be that large," Piering said.
    The flames burned through slash left from the clearcut and into
    some standing timber, Piering said. No homes or buildings were in
    danger. About 100 people and a helicopter battled the fire at an
    estimated cost of between $40,000 and $50,000, he said.
    Inmate crews from South Fork Forest Camp were mopping up on
    Sunday, he said.
    The National Interagency Fire Center has predicted that some
    lower elevations in the Pacific Northwest will burn in late June,
    but fires will begin in most areas in July. Officials are
    predicting a typical fire season for western Oregon and an active
    fire season in eastern Oregon.


    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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    Post July 26th

    PINE GROVE, Ore. (AP) - A 2,500-acre fire burned Monday on the
    north side of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Oregon's largest
    wildfire so far this summer.
    Approximately 335 people were fighting the Logs Springs fire,
    said Roger Peterson, spokesman at the Northwest Interagency
    Coordination Center in Portland. Firefighters have had no luck
    containing the blaze, he said.
    Twenty-one homes in a subdivision near the small town of
    Simnasho in Central Oregon were potentially threatened by the fire
    and were under a voluntary evacuation, Peterson said.
    As of Monday evening, 12 people had gathered at a evacuation
    center set up at a longhouse in Simnasho, he said.
    Oregon Highway 9 remained closed, blocking access to the
    Ka-Nee-Ta Resort and Indian Head Gaming Casino.
    According to Peterson, high winds on the east slopes of the
    Cascades Mountains could help fuel the blaze.
    "There could still be some growth this evening," he said.
    "It's still warm and there are still winds blowing."
    The fire was first reported Sunday afternoon. A cause has yet to
    be determined.

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  18. #18
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    Post July 27th

    Log Springs fire grows to 4,575 acres

    PINE GROVE, Ore. (AP) - Oregon's largest wildfire of the summer
    has grown to 45-hundred-75 acres on the north side of the Warm
    Springs Indian Reservation.
    Roger Peterson, spokesman at the Northwest Interagency
    Coordination Center, says about 430 people are fighting the Log
    Springs fire.
    He says the blaze is 25 percent contained.
    Peterson says 21 homes near the small town of Simnasho in
    Central Oregon are potentially threatened by the fire. They're
    under a voluntary evacuation.
    The fire was first reported Sunday afternoon. A cause has yet to
    be determined.


    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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  19. #19
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    Post July 29th

    PINE CREEK, Ore. (AP) - High winds fanned a wildfire burning on
    the north side of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation to
    10-thousand-500 acres.
    About 810 people are fighting the Log Springs fire, said Roger
    Peterson, spokesman at the Northwest Interagency Coordination
    Center.
    He says the blaze is 35 percent contained.
    Peterson says the fire is burning actively in an area called
    Beaver Creek Canyon, with spotting elsewhere.
    No homes were threatened as of tonight.
    Oregon Highway 9 remains closed to traffic between the town of
    Simnasho (sim-NASH'-oh) and the junction with Highway 26. That's
    blocking access to the Ka-Nee-Ta Resort and Indian Head Gaming
    Casino.
    Motorists are being advised to use Travel Route 3 through Warm
    Springs.
    Peterson says they should also watch out for reduced visibility
    due to smoke.


    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  20. #20
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    Post August 3rd

    HOOD RIVER, Ore. (AP) - A wildfire burning two miles east of
    Hood River has grown to 200 acres, authorities said.
    About 30 people were working on the Panorama fire in the
    Columbia Gorge, said Roger Peterson, a spokesman for the Northwest
    Interagency Coordination Center in Portland. Lightning sparked the
    blaze at about 6:30 p.m. on Monday, he said.
    "Gorge winds continued to blow pretty actively today, but crews
    were making pretty good progress," he said. There was no estimate
    as to the percentage contained.
    The Log Springs fire, Oregon's largest wildfire of the season,
    was 90 percent contained at 13,539 acres, Peterson said.
    About 450 people were working on the fire Tuesday, but fire
    officials demobilized two 20-person crews.

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    APTV 08-03-04 2156EDT
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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