Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    35

    Default need help to prove a point....

    We are currently looking into buying a new fire truck, we want crew cab pumper ( contender or something like that ) But we have to prove what the department benefits would be at the officers meeting and then (even worst) to the city meeting. I want to know how it helped your department to have a crew cab pumper. We are also thinking of putting our jaws of life on that truck. Please i really need your help.. Any stories, comments and/or feedback is really really welcomed.

    Thanks in advance for all stories, feedback and comments.

    Charle Chiasson
    FF, Fire Prevention Officer, Instructor


  2. #2
    Dispatch Dweller Jay911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    On the way to the station. Really. It's 12 kilometers away and there's traffic.
    Posts
    339

    Default

    Benefit of a crew cab pumper?

    You get enough firefighters to the scene to use the truck!

    When I joined my volunteer department in 1990, we'd just been assigned a GMC TopKick pumper with a three-man cab (with all the junk in the cab, it became a 2-man cab, though). You can't do effective firefighting with two people on a pump. We run 5 on each of our pumps and consider that ideal.

    If you're putting your "tools" on the truck, too, you have to, have to, have to have more than two or three people arriving with it. If you get involved in a difficult extrication, you are going to need to have a group of at least 4 people specifically dedicated to doing the extrication job.

    As an aside, regarding putting rescue equipment on a pumper - if you get to a rescue, you want to have a line off for protection, plus you want to have a crew for the tools/job, as I mentioned. Depending on how many people you run on a pump, you may want to rethink that idea. We specifically put our tools on a dedicated Rescue truck, partly for that reason.

    --j.
    this time posting as FF/EMT, Redwood Meadows Emergency Services

  3. #3
    Forum Member Smoke20286's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    873

    Default

    One excellent benefit is the ability to discuss and plan on your way to the incident.
    A'int No Rocket Scientist's in The Firehall

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber mcaldwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Panorama, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    3,022

    Default

    For volley crews, I think that fewer people responding in POV's is a big benefit as well. I don't know very many FF's who actually tell thier insurance companies that they respond in thier own vehicles, and in Canada only command Officers are permitted to use lights and sirens on POV's

    There is plenty of opportunity for litigation and/or a black eye for the dept/city if a volunteer caused a wreck on the way to a scene.

    Just another idea for your arguement. Good Luck!
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

    IACOJ

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    96

    Default

    From a safety standpoint ALL personnel have to be in an enclosed cab now as per NFPA 1901 and I would suggest all provincial WCB's and the new proposed ULC S515 Standard that will mirror in most respects the NFPA 1901-2003 Standard that is effective Jan 1/04.

    You need to decide if you can afford a 4 door commercial or custom cab and chassis? There are also crew cabs on commercial two door cabs that have an enclosed pump operator's panel (Transverse) thall also meet the requirements.

    There are many reputable builders available who will provide you with information and assistance.

  6. #6
    Junior Member ToxicAvenger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Originally posted by Smoke20286
    One excellent benefit is the ability to discuss and plan on your way to the incident.
    I second that. Great to have that ability prior to arriving on scene.
    If at first you don't succeed; skydiving isn't for you!

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1

    Default

    A closed cab is the way to go. They are warmer and provide an environment where each FF can be assigned his or her duty and prepare for that same duty. My station currently runs a 94 pierce which carries a 6-man crew. We have our rescue tools and everything else we need to work on a scene. It's a huge step up from the old scot we used to run. Good luck with your proposal.

  8. #8
    Forum Member LACAPT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    LA Can.
    Posts
    350

    Default

    Gee an enclosed cab, what a novel idea, ya think? For once you think that maybe the town coucil would get there heads out of their political arses, take a breath of fresh air and do some thing that is good for not only their fire dept. but benifets the community as a whole. I really feel for you FFs that are in the smaller communities with tight budgets. The playgrounds, community centres, tourist info buildings etc.etc. always seem to take priority over the fire dept. and there quest to make a safer community. Don't get me wrong these other things are important in there own right but who screams the loudest when one goes up in smoke and the FD is already at a disadvantage to fight said fire. I am extremely fortunate to serve on a FD that is held in high regard by our city council because they realise that we as a volly dept. are an extremely valuable asset to our city in relation to having to hire a full time force. Their acceptance of our FD enables us to do our job effectivly and safely and that is the bottom line. Didn't mean to turn this thread into a political soap box by my off topic rambling, but yes by all means buy and enclosed cab and tell town council to get on with life.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    20

    Talking

    As my wife always tells me - It's not the size that matters it's what you do with it!!!!!

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I am a ff here in alberta and quit a few vol ff's respond in personal vehicles. And yes, all are given lights, not just command.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts