1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Wildfire Risks-Western US

    SEATTLE (Reuters) - Western U.S. states, which had
    below-average rainfall last winter and are currently
    experiencing unusually dry weather, face a high risk of forest
    fires this summer, a local fire and land agency said
    Monday.
    Paul Werth, a weather expert at the Northwest Interagency
    Coordination Center, said that a report due to be presented to
    state governors Tuesday will warn of the increased risk of
    major wildfires breaking out over the coming months in a region
    of the United States that is especially prone to raging summer
    blazes.
    "The biggest reason in combination is the dry weather that
    we've had in June and the fact that we don't see any
    significant rainfall through the remainder of the month," Werth
    said.
    Last year, dry winds fanned massive flames that were fueled
    by the region's oily and dense brush, forest and grassland.
    Werth said that the Pacific Northwest states of Washington and
    Oregon alone saw 3,700 fires burn 1.1 million acres
    of land -- two to three times the yearly average.
    Forests on both sides of the Cascades mountain range, a
    North-South span of snow-capped mountains that span Washington
    and and Oregon, were at risk of spawning major blazes.
    Also at risk for major wildfires are most of California,
    Arizona, Nevada and Utah as well as the southern half of Idaho,
    the western third of Wyoming, southern Montana and western
    Colorado, Werth said.
    The report is aimed at helping local communities and
    firefighters prepare for the blazes, but tight budgets in state
    governments might translate into less resources to fight the
    fires, which rage for weeks and can consume hundreds of
    thousands of acres of wooded forest.
    REUTERS
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Summary-June 17th

    CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) - A 300-acre wildfire closed the highway
    to Lake Tahoe on Tuesday before firefighters began bringing it
    under control, while a prescribed burn in Arizona escaped control
    lines and forced the evacuation of about 15 homes.
    There were no immediate reports of injuries or property damage
    in the fire near Carson City. The Nevada Division of Forestry
    reported Tuesday evening the fire was 85 percent contained and was
    expected to be fully contained by Wednesday morning.
    "We throw the world at it. You can always turn them around,"
    said division spokeswoman Kelli Baratti.
    The fire in central Arizona was within a half-mile of homes in
    an area about three miles north of Cherry, officials said. The
    4,500-acre fire escaped the northern perimeter on Tuesday.
    In the eastern part of the state, a 10,618-acre fire about 15
    miles from Alpine was brought under control on Tuesday.
    In Alaska, a 10,000-acre fire burned through the Goodpaster
    Valley southeast of Fairbanks, threatening a handful of
    recreational cabins.
    The fire began with a lightning strike Saturday. Firefighters
    returning by helicopter Sunday night said they could not contain
    the fire because there was no nearby water source.
    The National Interagency Fire Center said the number and acreage
    of large wildfires nationally is running about 30 percent below
    average. However, the agency said much of the Interior West,
    Northwest and portions of California and the Northern Rockies still
    are expected to have an above-normal fire season.
    Two large fires are burning within the Gila National Forest in
    southwestern New Mexico. One, sparked by lightning April 17, has
    burned 51,000 acres, said Loretta Ray, a spokeswoman national
    forest. That fire is contained. Another, also sparked by lightning,
    has burned about 15,000 acres.
    "They're low intensity fires. It's been a good opportunity to
    allow fire to resume its role in the ecosystem," Ray said. "It's
    a real challenge for us to explain to people that it's not a real
    catastrophic fire danger."
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register