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  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Aug 2001
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    25 NW of the GW
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    Post Fire Resistant Bedding

    THOMASVILLE, N.C. (AP) - The owners of Carolina Mattress Guild
    don't need a bunch of laboratory tests to prove to them there's a
    ready market for fire-resistant bedding products.
    On Jan. 13, 2001, the small, privately owned firm had just
    ramped up production in a new factory along Business 85 in
    Thomasville when some bedding materials caught fire on the plant
    floor.
    All 85 employees got out safely, but the fast-moving blaze
    consumed the inventory and equipment, causing nearly $3 million in
    damages. The enormity of the destruction stayed with owners Kathy
    and Neal Grigg, both veterans of the home furnishings industry.
    "We saw what happens when foam burns," Neal Grigg said.
    Production resumed a couple of weeks later in a rented space a
    few miles away. Work also began immediately on developing a new
    line of bedding that could meet tough new open-flame mattress
    standards being proposed by the state of California.
    Carolina Mattress Guild introduced its "Safe Dreams" line in
    April of this year at the International Home Furnishings Market in
    High Point. Kathy Grigg believes the line will distinguish the
    small North Carolina company from much larger rivals such as Sealy
    Corp. and Serta Inc.
    "This something we knew we could do and we spent a lot of time
    on it," she said.
    Several weeks after the fire, Carolina Mattress Guild's owners
    and their workers were back in a new plant with a newfound mission.
    The company began testing different kinds of technology, looking
    for one that could meet the safety requirements without sacrificing
    comfort.
    Eventually, Carolina Mattress Guild teamed up with Elk
    Technologies, which is better known for making fire-resistant
    building materials, particularly for the roofing industry.
    Elk Technologies developed a VeraShield fire barrier, which met
    the bedding maker's goals for flame resistance and comfort. The
    barrier is quilted to the ticking, which is the strong material
    used for casings of mattresses.
    The barrier also is used in the box spring on the bedding sets,
    which will retail from $599 to about $1,200. The company began
    shipping last month to retailers in the mid-Atlantic area but also
    can ship to all 50 states - including California.
    Last week, North Carolina Insurance Commissioner Jim Long
    commended Carolina Mattress Guild for becoming the first bedding
    maker in the nation to pledge that it will meet the stringent fire
    safety standards proposed by California, which is pioneering the
    cause.
    California's fire safety standard for bedding is likely to
    become a national requirement, said Long, who believes it could
    save hundreds of lives a year.
    "Fires that begin in the bedroom are often the most deadly,"
    said Long, who also serves as North Carolina's state fire marshal.
    "Household occupants who are sleeping many be unable to awaken in
    time to save their lives or those of their loved ones."
    Miles Bristow, a spokesman for the California Department of
    Consumer Affairs, said his state's new fire-resistant standard is
    scheduled to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2004.
    "All mattresses that are made for sale on or after that date
    must meet our open-flame standards, which means more protections
    for consumers," he said.
    While the agency doesn't endorse particular products or
    companies, Bristow said, Carolina Mattress Guild is demonstrating
    how safety can be used as a marketing tool.
    "We think the cost to consumers will be moderate," he said.
    "People are willing to pay a reasonable cost for more safety."
    Initially, the added features will not cost the consumer
    anything. The company is absorbing the cost of adding the
    fire-resistant technology to its bedding line, said Neal Grigg.
    The Griggs acknowledge it could take some education for
    consumers to understand all the benefits of fire-resistant bedding,
    which will give people more time to escape deadly flames and smoke
    in the event of a house fire.
    "Our next big push is to include this on our lower price point
    bedding lines," said Kathy Grigg. "We want to reach families with
    young children."
    ---
    On the Net:
    North Carolina Department of Insurance: http://www.ncdoi.com/
    California Department of Consumer Affairs:
    http://www.dca.ca.gov/
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber Diane E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Location
    Maryland (but always a Long Islander first)
    Posts
    1,103

    Thumbs up

    Well, it's about time industry figured it out.
    "When I was young, my ambition was to be one of the people who made a difference in this world. My hope is to leave the world a little better for my having been there."
    -- Jim Henson (1936 - 1990)

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