1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post The State of Washington

    LINCOLN, Wash. (AP) - A fire on the Colville Indian Reservation,
    called the Rattlesnake Canyon fire, swelled to 3,000 acres,
    increasing its coverage area in northcentral Washington by nearly
    50 percent over Saturday, fire officials said Sunday.
    A smaller blaze, the Paddle fire, had consumed 700 acres on the
    Spokane Indian Reservation to the east, and up north in the
    Pasayten Wilderness, three fires covered a total of about 1,680
    acres.
    The Rattlesnake Canyon fire, on the north side of the Columbia
    River, just across from the little town of Lincoln and west of the
    Columbia's confluence with the Spokane River, was in a remote area
    and not threatening homes, said Marc Hollen with the Northwest
    Interagency Fire Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
    But he said it's going to take more than the 100 firefighters
    on-site to take care of this one. The flames were devouring the
    area's tinder-dry pine trees and sagebrush, Hollen said: "The
    grasses give it speed and the pines give it intensity."
    The very active fire was jumping lines built to contain it,
    Carol Tocco of the center said Sunday night.
    A multi-agency fire-management team took over the blaze Sunday
    afternoon, working with anthropologists to ensure protection for
    important tribal cultural sites in the area.
    The cause of the fire, which began late Friday near the river,
    was being investigated, Tocco said Sunday night.
    "There was no lightning or anything of that nature," Hollen
    said.
    No containment date had been set, he said.
    On the Spokane Indian Reservation, meanwhile - in the same area
    but east of the Spokane River - the Paddle fire had scorched 700
    acres by Sunday night. That blaze, which started Saturday, was not
    burning as strongly as the one on the nearby Colville Rez, in part
    due to wind and available fuels.
    The fire, about 35 miles northwest of Spokane, apparently began
    with fireworks shot off a boat in Lake Roosevelt, said Bureau of
    Indian Affairs spokeswoman Ann Dahl in Wellpinit. The lake is a
    long, deep stretch of the Columbia behind the Grand Coulee Dam.
    Some area roads were closed Sunday and people have been asked to
    leave the Pierre Campground, near where the fire began, Dahl said.
    A multi-agency management crew was taking over that fight Sunday
    evening. The Paddle fire was about 25 percent contained Saturday
    but there was no updated figure available Sunday, and no word on
    the amount of personnel on hand.
    "The two fires can see each other's columns," Hollen said, and
    crews on the Spokane Reservation fire thought their blaze looked
    "pretty puny" compared to the larger conflagration to the west.
    Meanwhile, farther north in the Methow Valley near Winthrop, the
    Farewell Creek fire expanded about 100 acres overnight to 1,360
    acres, said Nick Michel with the state Department of Natural
    Resources.
    It was the largest of three fires in that area, and containment
    was zero, Michel said. Two smaller fires were contained. Tocco of
    the interagency center said the 120-acre Fawn Peak blaze and the
    200-acre Sweetgrass Fire were both contained Sunday.
    Fresh crews were due to hit the Farewell Creek fire Sunday, he
    said.
    "We have about 800 people on all three fires, and a whole bunch
    of equipment," he said.
    Sunday marked the start of a ground assault on the Farewell
    Creek fire, tackled only by air previously. Fire managers had
    worked out a new strategy and about 200 incoming firefighters were
    being directed to the blaze, along with bulldozers and other ground
    equipment.
    "This is the first day of a real ground assault on the Farewell
    Creek Fire," Michel said.
    The blaze is in rough, steep terrain and "it took time to find
    a safe place to put firefighters on the ground," Hollen said.
    ---
    On the Net:
    www.or.blm.gov/nwcc

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Reducing risks, Increasing concerns

    WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - A state official has cited the U.S.
    Forest Service for excess smoke generated by a prescribed burn in
    June, saying efforts to address health concerns about such smoke
    through inter-agency meetings apparently got nowhere.
    The June 18 notice of violation marked the first time the state
    Ecology Department had cited the Forest Service for a planned burn.
    Ecology can issue fines of up to $10,000 per day for violations,
    but will not decide whether to impose a fine until after the Forest
    Service responds to the notice.
    Susan Billings, Ecology's air quality program manager in Yakima,
    said her agency met with the U.S. Forest Service and state
    Department of Natural Resources in February to discuss problems
    with smoke in the Methow Valley last fall, when citizens complained
    about the amount and duration of prescribed burning.
    When a similar problem arose the very next spring, Billings
    said, it was time to take action.
    Billings said her agency is not opposed to prescribed burning
    intended to thin forests and help prevent catastrophic wildfires.
    But, she added, "What we expect is, when burning is used as a
    tool, that it be conducted in a way that it doesn't affect public
    health."
    Billings said she wants to discuss whether the state's Smoke
    Management Plan is being applied as written, and possible
    revisions. A letter from her agency to the DNR that accompanied a
    copy of the notice of violation suggests the plan isn't working as
    well as it could.
    Roger Autry, DNR's smoke and fuels management specialist, says
    the plan works but that there will be occasions when the weather
    doesn't perform as expected.
    That's what happened June 4, he said, when he approved ignition
    of part of the Cub Creek/Rendezvous prescribed burn north of
    Winthrop - the fire that drew the citation.
    Autry said he told the Forest Service it couldn't burn for at
    least three or four days in a row before June 4, because the wind
    would have pushed smoke down into the valley.
    But because the inversion was expected to lift at 10 a.m. June
    4, he told the federal agency it could proceed then with a
    1,000-acre burn.
    The inversion did not lift, however, and smoke was trapped in
    the valley, prompting a flurry of complaints from residents.
    DNR approval is based on other factors besides weather, Autry
    said - the size of the burn area, the elevation, the type of
    material being burned and the number of days the burn will take.
    But because it's harder to predict the weather several days in
    advance, larger, multi-day burns require more difficult decisions.
    "The farther you go out in the forecast, the shakier the
    information gets," he said.
    Richy Harrod, fire ecologist for the Okanogan and Wenatchee
    National Forests, said the National Fire Plan provides funds for
    thinning and prescribed burning, especially near residential areas.
    A combination of thinning and prescribed burns is often needed
    to create a healthy forest that is less prone to catastrophic fire,
    Harrod said. Between 10,000 and 12,000 acres are burned on the two
    forests each year, he said, and 7,500 acres are non-commercially
    thinned.
    "We'll need at least four times, and maybe more, the number of
    acres we're currently doing to reverse the trend," he said.
    "That's a lot. More than we are capable of doing at current
    funding or person-power."
    The challenge will be to find a way to protect air quality as
    such burns are increased, Harrod said.
    "There's going to be more smoke associated with that," he
    said. "It's a trade-off between severe, all-summer wildfires
    versus having fire for short periods, where we can have control
    over it."
    Ecology spokeswoman Joye Redfield-Wilder said that's going to be
    an issue for all communities that border national forests.
    "If this is going to become a routine thing, it could be
    they're going to be smoked out from April to November," she said.
    The violation notice has already sparked interest around the
    country, she said.
    "The threat of wildfire is valid," she said. "However, all
    ways of thinning the forest need to be considered."

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  3. #3
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post July 9th

    KELLER, Wash. (AP) - Clear skies brought warmer temperatures but
    less wind Wednesday, helping firefighters battling the state's
    largest wildfire.
    The Rattlesnake Canyon fire on the Colville Indian Reservation
    in northeast Washington was 50 percent contained Wednesday and did
    not gain much ground during the day.
    The fire has burned 10,600 acres. Three additional outbuildings
    were burned Wednesday, for a total of 10 outbuildings and one
    summer home lost to the fire, said Marc Hollen, a spokesman for the
    Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
    Ground crews aided by aircraft were trying to push the flames
    toward the nearby Columbia River, fire information officer Troy
    Kinghorn said.
    More than 500 firefighters were working the blaze, Hollen said.
    The cause of the fire is still under investigation, but
    officials have said they believe fireworks are to blame.
    Crews have built a fire line around a group of homes and the
    flames have passed around them. Officials are currently expecting
    lines to hold around another group of expensive homes in a
    community known as Balcomville.
    The fire has been burning since July 4, and officials said they
    expect to have it contained by Sunday.
    Meanwhile, the Paddle fire on the adjacent Spokane Indian
    Reservation was 100 percent contained late Wednesday and an
    evacuation readiness warning has been lifted. The fire burned 1,324
    acres and was started by fireworks.
    The remote Farewell Creek fire near the Pasayten Wilderness in
    northcentral Washington continued to burn over roughly 1,600 acres.
    There was no estimate of containment on that fire.
    The Farewell Creek fire is burning in mostly wilderness
    locations and is not threatening any structures.
    There have been no injuries in any of the Washington fires.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  4. #4
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post July 14th

    YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) - A dangerous wildfire 20 miles west of here
    held steady at about 2,000 acres on Monday and residents who had to
    leave 20 homes last Friday were allowed to return, fire officials
    said.
    About 500 firefighters had contained some 30 percent of the
    Middle Fork wildfire near Tampico, fire spokesman Dale Warriner
    said. No structures have burned, he said.
    The fire is burning in densely timbered slopes in the Cascade
    Range. It is the most dangerous of several Washington state
    wildfires that cover some 25,000 acres, officials said. No injuries
    have been reported in any of the fires.
    Residents of another 150 homes in the area remained on notice
    that they might have to evacuate, Warriner said.
    "There is still an active fire on the hill there," he said.
    "We want to err on the side of caution."
    Fifteen of 25 fire engines brought from other communities to
    protect homes in the Tampico area will be released Tuesday morning,
    Warriner said. Ten engines will remain to protect homes.
    Warriner said there is some suspicion that fireworks started the
    fire, but the cause has not been determined.
    Elsewhere in Washington, the remote Farewell Creek fire near the
    Pasayten Wilderness continued to burn Monday in the northcentral
    part of the state, but firefighters were confident they would get
    the upper hand.
    The fire was 10 percent contained Monday afternoon and has
    burned over 12,502 acres, Warriner said. No structures were
    threatened and none had burned.
    Crews spent much of Monday building more lines to prevent the
    fire's spread to the east and northeast. Firefighters hope to
    prevent the flames from crossing the Chewuch River on the east,
    information officer Tom Knappenberger said.
    "We're still pretty cautious because of the terrain and the
    heat," Knappenberger said. "There's a lot of work to be done on
    the fire yet."
    The Rattlesnake Canyon fire on the Colville Indian Reservation
    near Spokane was 90 percent contained Monday and crews were
    demobilizing and heading out, said Troy Kinghorn, fire information
    officer. That fire burned 10,600 acres and destroyed one summer
    residence.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  5. #5
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post July 16th

    OKANOGAN, Wash. (AP) - Seven or eight homes burned Wednesday and
    dozens more were threatened by a wildfire in this northcentral
    Washington town, officials said.
    The fire started behind Okanogan High School on Wednesday
    afternoon and moved quickly up a hillside, said Okanogan County
    Sheriff's Sgt. Jennifer Johnson.
    "Every fire department in the county is on the scene or en
    route," Johnson said.
    There have been no injuries, she added.
    Residents of dozens of homes were evacuated. The Red Cross set
    up a shelter at the United Methodist Church downtown.
    Mark Clemens of the state Emergency Operations Center in Olympia
    said seven or eight homes had been destroyed, and the 150-acre fire
    was threatening at least 30 other homes on a hillside above the
    town of 2,000 people.
    More than 125 firefighters and 45 engines and water tenders from
    outside Okanogan County were dispatched to assist beleaguered local
    firefighters, Clemens said. They included fire crews from the
    Wenatchee and Tri-Cities areas.
    An airplane from the Bureau of Indian Affairs was dropping fire
    retardant around homes, Johnson said.
    Okanogan is about 50 miles south of the Canadian border, far
    from the state's population centers.
    Residents on Wednesday night were asked not to use water to
    preserve the resource for firefighters.
    The cause of the fire was not known.
    The fire started on a grassy hillside and moved quickly uphill
    to a neighborhood of upscale homes overlooking the town, Deputy
    City Clerk Betty Anderson said.
    Sheriff Frank Rogers said firefighters were overwhelmed in the
    opening minutes by the wind-whipped flames.
    "We went to the top and it was within 10 minutes (of
    starting)," Rogers said. "We were trying to protect the house,
    and it went over our heads and onto the roof. It was just
    incredible."
    Sheriff's deputies pitched in to fight the fire.
    "A lot of us have heat stroke right now," Rogers said.
    "There are several rows of houses on a hill and it took them
    down one at a time," said witness Brenda Crowell. "I've never
    seen anything burn that fast."
    The flames were not posing any danger to the downtown area,
    Anderson said.
    Elsewhere in Washington, the remote Farewell Creek fire near the
    Pasayten Wilderness continued to burn, also in the northcentral
    part of the state.
    The lightning-caused fire was 35 percent contained Wednesday and
    has burned over 15,750 acres, spokesman Mike Ferris said. No
    structures were threatened and none had burned.
    About 500 firefighters had contained about 70 percent of the
    Middle Fork wildfire in the densely forested eastern slopes of the
    Cascade Range near Tampico, west of Yakima, fire spokesman Dale
    Warriner said. That fire has burned about 2,000 acres, but no
    structures were destroyed.
    Warriner said some believe fireworks started the Middle Fork
    fire.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  6. #6
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post July 17th

    By CHRIS RODKEY
    Associated Press Writer
    OKANOGAN, Wash. (AP) - It was three weeks ago Thursday that
    Jackie Bradley's husband, Bob, died of a heart attack on the front
    lawn of their home.
    Now that elegant house is a smoldering pile of ashes on a
    hillside above the town of Okanogan.
    Bradley's home and five others were destroyed when a wildfire
    leaped through their neighborhood Wednesday afternoon. Fueled by
    dry brush and gusting winds, the fire also seriously damaged two
    other homes in this north-central Washington community of about
    2,000 people, located 50 miles south of the Canadian border.
    "We lived here 25 years," Bradley said, crying and embracing
    her friends and neighbors Thursday morning. "This is where my
    roots are."
    No injuries were reported. Firefighters continued battling
    flare-ups caused by 20 mph winds on Thursday.
    Elsewhere in Washington, the remote Farewell Creek fire nearly
    doubled in size overnight, to 31,971 acres, straying north into the
    Pasayten Wilderness west of Okanogan.
    The fire, started by lightning June 29, was 35 percent contained
    Thursday despite the expansion, which was attributed to wind, dry
    fuel conditions and steep country.
    No structures were threatened by the Farewell Creek fire and
    none has burned.
    "When the wind pushed it, it raced up the hills ... and covered
    a lot of ground," said Mike Ferris with the National Incident
    Management Team.
    Spokesman Steve Butterworth said earlier that firefighters were
    limited in the tactics they can use in wilderness areas.
    The 350-acre fire that burned the Okanogan homes was
    human-caused, and Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said
    Thursday that officers were looking at a "person of interest." He
    did not provide details.
    Okanogan damage estimates will likely top $1 million.
    Dozens of other houses were threatened before firefighters,
    aided by aircraft dropping retardant, contained the fire Wednesday
    evening, Rogers said.
    When flames approached her home, Bradley grabbed what she could:
    some pictures, four dresses, and the flag she received when her
    husband, a former Marine, was buried. She also took her cat,
    Powderpuff.
    "It's been real hard for Jackie, but she has a lot of
    support," said friend Lynette Grandy, who stayed by Bradley's
    side.
    Just down Crestview Drive, Richard Manning pulled in to his
    driveway and saw his house for the first time since he left it when
    it was burning.
    When asked if he was able to save anything, he replied,
    "nothing," and took a slow drink from a coffee mug donated by a
    friend.
    Manning hadn't rummaged through the rubble, waiting until his
    wife, Elaine, could return from a trip to Seattle. But as he
    gestured over the debris, he said, "Quite obviously there's going
    to be nothing left."
    Manning, a former school speech pathologist, built the house in
    1972 and moved in with his wife, a retired school teacher.
    "My son said he's lost all of his memories," Manning said.
    "That's kind of hard to deal with."
    Manning saw the flames start partway down the hill. He and his
    son rushed to his neighbor's house, fearing the flames would hit
    there first. But when he turned around, the flames were at his
    doorstep.
    "I opened the back door and the windows were shattering and the
    glass was flying," he said. "There was no way to get in the
    house."
    The smoke had cleared and the sky was bright blue when Manning
    returned to survey the damage Thursday.
    "It's harder to deal with this morning than it was last
    night," he said. "Now you've got to deal with reality."
    Bob and Trish Butler looked at the remains of Gary and Barb
    Christensen's house from their backyard. Flames had singed the
    trees between the two properties.
    "We were really worried," Trish Butler said. "Five more
    minutes and we probably would have lost it."
    The Christensens were on vacation when the fire hit. A neighbor
    was able to save a cat from their house.
    Butler said she and her husband will replace the cedar shake
    roof that covered their home. Most of the homes burned in the blaze
    had cedar shakes, which very quickly catch fire.
    Another wildfire west of Yakima, the Middle Fork fire, has been
    fully contained, spokeswoman Betty Blodgett said.
    There were 463 firefighters still assigned to the 2,100-acre
    blaze near Tampico on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range, but
    they will be released starting this weekend, she said. No
    structures were destroyed. Officials have said fireworks are
    suspected as the cause.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  7. #7
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post 7/20

    CHENEY, Wash. (AP) - A new wildfire burned through about 1,000
    acres of timber and grasslands Sunday in a rural area near here,
    burning some buildings and forcing people to leave their homes.
    About 15 to 20 homes were evacuated, said Fire Chief Bruce
    Holloway of Spokane County Fire District 3.
    Crews from around Spokane County were joined by state Department
    of Natural Resources crews fighting the blaze. Holloway said some
    structures had burned but he did not know whether they were houses
    or outbuildings.
    The fire was burning about five miles southwest of Cheney at the
    intersection of Watt and Ritchey roads, he said. The cause of the
    blaze was not known.
    The Cheney fire was among several wildfires burning Sunday in
    central and eastern Washington amid dry conditions. Temperatures
    were in the 90s, and expected to reach as high as 103 degrees in
    Eastern Washington on Monday and possibly up to 107 on Tuesday.
    There were no reports of injuries in any of the fires.
    North of Winthrop, the Farewell Creek fire - biggest in the
    state - was estimated Sunday at 48,156 acres. The acreage was more
    than 12,000 acres higher than previously reported because of better
    mapping.
    "They had just flown around it with a helicopter to do the best
    they could," said Kris Eriksen, spokeswoman for the Farewell Creek
    fire management team. "It's been growing over the last three days,
    but we had only done fly-by estimates."
    Nine homes south of the blaze were no longer threatened, since
    the fire was burning north and northeast. Crews cleared brush and
    burned fire lines around the homes several days ago, Eriksen said.
    Firefighters wrapped three cabins in remote areas of the
    Pasayten Wilderness with fire-proofing material, Eriksen said.
    The fire was about 35 percent contained, burning in heavy timber
    and sub-alpine fir. The southern flank of the fire was about 13
    miles north of Winthrop. Its northern edge was about 8 miles south
    of the Canadian border. The fire was started by lightning June 29.
    Northwest of Spokane, a fire on the Colville Indian Reservation
    continued to threaten 37 homes Sunday evening. Seven of the homes
    had been evacuated, said Mauragrace Healey of the Northwest
    Interagency Fire Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
    The McGinnis Flats fire had burned 1,030 acres and was 40
    percent contained, she said.
    Ground crews were being assisted by retardant-dropping tankers
    and helicopters as they fought the blaze in mixed timber and grass.
    The fire, which had burned two outbuildings, was believed to be
    human-caused, although it remained under investigation, Healey
    said.
    Firefighters had the 250-acre Elephant Head fire northwest of
    Ellensburg fully contained, Healey said. It started Friday night,
    and while the cause remained under investigation, it was suspicious
    in origin, said Marc Hollen of the fire coordination agency.



    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  8. #8
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post 7/21

    By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS
    Associated Press Writer
    Fire crews battling three wildfires in Eastern Washington braced
    for temperatures expected to soar as high as 104.
    Progress has been made on a wildfire west of Cheney, southwest
    of Spokane. The Watt Road fire continued to threaten 36 structures,
    but was 40 percent contained Monday night, said Josie Williams of
    the Washington Incident Management Team.
    It has destroyed 14 vehicles and seven outbuildings.
    That fire, plus fires near Keller in northeast Washington and in
    the Pasayten Wilderness along the Canadian border, had consumed
    more than 50,000 acres and were being fought by more than 1,700
    firefighters.
    The largest blaze was the Farewell Creek fire, last estimated at
    48,162 acres, burning virtually unchecked in the Pasayten
    Wilderness. That fire grew Monday, enlarging mainly on the west
    flank, but fire spokesmen said conditions were so smoky they would
    have to wait for results of an infrared overflight to provide a new
    acreage figure.
    There have been no injuries or major property losses on any of
    the fires.
    For the 466 firefighters working the 1,700-acre McGinnis Flats
    fire on the Colville Indian Reservation near Keller on Monday,
    "staying hydrated is their main concern," said Noel Hardin, fire
    spokesman.
    The fire continued to threaten more than 30 homes, and had
    destroyed two outbuildings. It also was 40 percent contained.
    The Watt Road wildfire roared to life Sunday.
    One of the vehicles it destroyed was a fire truck whose crew had
    parked in what they thought was a safe place and headed toward the
    fire,
    A sudden shift in winds caused the flames to burn over the fire
    truck on Sunday, destroying it, Williams said.
    The Watt Road fire was downsized from 1,300 acres to 1,060 acres
    Monday because of more accurate mapping, she said.
    On the Farewell Creek fire, spokesman Steve Butterworth said,
    "It's hot. It's dry and it's windy."
    That fire was only about one-third contained by fire lines.
    Farewell Creek fire commanders, who had been working from a base
    near Winthrop, on Monday established a second command post near
    Tonasket on the east side of the fire to open a second front,
    Butterworth said.
    That step was taken because "the fire is growing more complex
    and large."
    Butterworth urged anyone headed into the backcountry on the west
    side of the fire to talk to local rangers for the most up-to-date
    information. Fire officials were comfortable with the backcountry
    closures they have in place on the east side, he said.
    Even though more than 1,000 firefighters are on the blaze, the
    primary effort has been from the air, he said. That's because there
    are no roads or escape routes in the steep terrain of the
    wilderness, he said.
    David Widmark of the federal Interagency Coordination Center in
    Portland, Ore., said a concern now is that the fire will burn
    across the border into Canada.
    Widmark said meetings were taking place to decide whether U.S.
    or Canadian firefighters should take the lead in that event.
    The fire is burning in heavy timber. The southern flank of the
    fire was about 13 miles north of Winthrop on Monday. Its northern
    edge was about 8 miles south of the Canadian border. The fire was
    started by lightning on June 29.
    The McGinnis Flats fire, which started July 18, was believed to
    be human-caused. It remained under investigation.
    The Watt Road fire was burning in timber and grass. The cause
    was under investigation.
    ---
    On The Web:
    Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center:
    www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  9. #9
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post US/Canada

    By JIM COUR
    Associated Press Writer
    SEATTLE (AP) - If the Farewell Creek fire in northcentral
    Washington crosses into Canada as expected, U.S. firefighters will
    join forces with Canadian firefighters to battle it.
    "We have a strong relationship with our Canadian fire
    management and agency administrators," Darrel Kenops, acting
    supervisor of the Okanogan and Wenatchee national forests, told The
    Associated Press on Tuesday. "We meet every year to talk about
    these sorts of things."
    The fire was started by lightning June 29 in the upper Methow
    Valley north of Winthrop. By Tuesday, the north edge of the fire
    was about five miles from the Canadian border, the Wenatchee-based
    Kenops told a Seattle news conference.
    Also present were state Lands Commissioner Doug Sutherland and
    Linda Goodman, U.S. Forest Service regional forester from Portland,
    Ore.
    The cost of fighting the Farewell Creek fire so far is $17
    million, with the total expected to go far higher, Goodman said.
    The primary costs are the helicopters that drop water and
    retardant and labor costs for about 1,000 firefighters, who are
    working in 20-person crews in 12- to 14-hour shifts, the fire
    officials said.
    Washington state's largest wildfire so far this season was also
    threatening to spread from the Pasayten Wilderness east into the
    Loomis State Forest, which is state Department of Natural Resources
    land. It was 10 miles west of the Loomis Forest on Tuesday,
    Sutherland said.
    "If we can't control this fire, it could move all the way over
    into the valley area here, which would include probably another
    60,000 to 75,000 acres of forested land," Sutherland said.
    Kenops said two British Columbia fire management officials
    attended a fire briefing Sunday night in Twisp.
    "They've been reflecting on strategy if it does come across the
    border," he said. "So we've been talking about how we can work
    together."
    Kenops wants to get permission from the Canadians for U.S.
    helicopters to begin making water drops on the Canadian side of the
    border. Four heavy-lift helicopters, four medium helicopters and
    three lighter helicopters have been dropping water on the fire on
    the U.S. side.
    "So we can come at it from Canada," he said. "That's what
    we're looking for."
    The firefighters are battling the Farewell Creek blaze in higher
    mountain elevations, but they're still working in 90-degree-plus
    temperatures. The fire is burning heavy timber, including Douglas
    fir.
    Goodman and Sutherland said the worst may be yet to come in the
    Northwest's fire season.
    "We've already had unprecedented fires in Oregon and Washington
    this year," Goodman said. "We're going to see more, I'm afraid."
    Sutherland said fire officials had been warned by National
    Weather Service forecasters that no significant rainfall is
    expected in the next 30 days.
    "It's dry right now and it's going to continue to be dry," he
    said. "So what we're looking at is not only Eastern Washington,
    where we do have some major fires, but also we have significant
    issues to be aware of on the west side of the mountains."

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  10. #10
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Farewell Fire

    By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS
    Associated Press Writer
    The nearly 59,000-acre Farewell Creek fire in northcentral
    Washington is generating winds so strong they can rip trees out by
    the roots and throw them ahead of the flames, officials said
    Wednesday.
    It will probably require snow or heavy rain later this year to
    extinguish the flames in the wilderness inferno, fire spokesman
    Steve Butterworth said.
    "It is highly likely this fire will not be contained by
    anything we can do," Butterworth said.
    "We see no weather coming in the foreseeable future that would
    slow the fire," Butterworth said. "The fire is going to continue
    to grow."
    Three wildfires burning now in Washington have consumed about
    62,000 acres in all, but no homes have been lost and no major
    injuries have been reported.
    Fire districts in Eastern Washington were issued a warning
    Tuesday by the National Weather Service that extremely low
    humidity, high temperatures and winds gusting to 30 mph in the
    region have increased the danger of wildfires.
    The Farewell Creek fire is generating plumes of smoke that can
    be seen from space. The fire is also generating winds so turbulent
    that burning fuel is being thrown three-quarters of a mile in front
    of the flames, Butterworth said.
    Because the fire is burning in the Pasayten Wilderness near the
    Canadian border, where motorized vehicles are prohibited, the fire
    on that northern front is being fought only from the air,
    Butterworth said.
    Ground forces will not be used because a lack of roads in
    wilderness areas means there is no escape route for the
    firefighters, Butterworth said.
    But ground forces would not make a difference, because normal
    fire barriers like creeks, roads or manmade trails could not stop
    flames of this size, he said.
    "This fire is going to chew away at the wilderness,"
    Butterworth said.
    Officials in the United States officially warned their
    counterparts in Canada on Wednesday that the flames were 5 miles
    from the border and headed in their direction, Butterworth said.
    "The U.S.-Canadian border will not be sufficient to stop this
    fire," Butterworth said.
    The fire was started by lightning June 29, and so far has cost
    about $19 million to fight by more than 1,100 firefighters. They
    are working primarily to keep the flames contained within the
    wilderness boundaries, using backfires and retardant drops.
    The fire was estimated at 58,734 acres Wednesday night, said
    fire spokeswoman Deanna Raskovich.
    Environmental groups praised the efforts of firefighters who are
    letting the flames burn.
    "The Forest Service deserves kudos for placing a priority on
    protecting people and property and not pouring resources into the
    backcountry where fire is natural and unavoidable," said Mitch
    Friedman of the Northwest Ecosystem Alliance.
    Elsewhere in Washington, a dozen huge hay stacks belonging to
    Anderson Hay & Grain caught fire Tuesday afternoon near Ellensburg,
    with the smoke visible for miles. No injuries were reported.
    The fire destroyed an estimated 10,000 tons of hay, worth more
    than $1 million. Kittitas County officials said the fire appeared
    to be accidentally caused by workers using leaf blowers in the
    area.
    A fire burning on the Colville Indian Reservation north of
    Keller was at 2,217 acres Wednesday night, and was 55 percent
    contained. There were 638 firefighters on the line, fire spokesman
    Noel Hardin said.
    The McGinnis Flats fire started on July 18 and initial
    investigation has determined that it was human caused. The fire has
    cost $1.8 million to fight and containment is expected on Saturday.
    No homes have burned but two outbuildings have been lost.
    The 1,064-acre Watt Road fire southwest of Cheney, near Spokane,
    was 80 percent contained Wednesday night, said fire spokesman Mike
    Chandler.
    ---
    On The Web:
    Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center:
    www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  11. #11
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post July 24, 2003

    TONASKET, Wash. (AP) - Gov. Gary Locke marveled Thursday at the
    size of the Farewell Creek wildfire, saying plumes of smoke rose
    higher than his airplane.
    Locke flew over the 58,734-acre fire, largest in the state, and
    stopped at a fire command post at Tonasket Middle School.
    "It was just an incredible sight," Locke said. "The smoke
    column was higher than our plane and there were dozens and dozens
    of fires."
    A crew of firefighters shook hands with Locke as he entered the
    building.
    "All you guys here, I appreciate your hard work," he told the
    firefighters. "Hang in there, keep safe, make sure your crews keep
    safe."
    Three major wildfires burning in Washington have swept across
    more than 62,000 acres but there have been no serious injuries or
    homes lost.
    The fire near the Canadian border is growing in heavy timber,
    said Mark Morris, a deputy forest supervisor for the
    Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest.
    It is getting so large that it will take a "season-ending
    event" - typically an early winter snowfall - to fully put out the
    flames, Morris said.
    "This is not going to be a quick 'put in a bulldozer line, put
    out the fire,"' said Bob Anderson, an incident commander. "This
    is going to burn for three months before it's out."
    The fire has also shifted into a drier area of the Pasayten
    Wilderness, where trees at the end of their 80-year life span have
    been naturally killed by disease and insects, Morris said. The last
    fires there occurred in 1929 and 1930.
    Officials from the British Columbia Forest Service met with U.S.
    officials Thursday since the blaze is just a few miles from the
    border. It threatens British Columbia's Cathedral Provincial Park
    and Snowy Provincial Park.
    "Fires don't recognize borders," said Denis Gaudry, manager of
    the Kamloops Fire Center in British Columbia.
    Canadian crews may join U.S. firefighters as the blaze gets
    closer, he said.
    "We have a very close working relationship with the folks down
    here," Gaudry said, adding officials hope the fire will stop at
    natural mountain barriers of rock and bare land.
    Locke told fire managers he would provide whatever resources
    Washington state could offer, including extra crews and money.
    On the east, the fire is currently approaching the Loomis State
    Forest, a 136,000-acre reserve owned by the state. Money from
    logging the forest is used to build schools in the state.
    "Whatever the fire commanders need or want they'll get," Locke
    said. "They have full control."
    About 200 of the approximately 1,100 firefighters on the
    Farewell Creek fire right now are from the state Department of
    Natural Resources, many of them inmate crews, said Todd Myers, a
    spokesman for state Lands Commissioner Doug Sutherland's office.
    Should the fire move into the Loomis Forest, it would be moving
    closer to communities and working forests and thus the total number
    of firefighters would likely increase, Myers said. State crews
    would be a part of that, he said.
    Locke said he was impressed with the way the fire management
    team was cooperating. When he first started coming to fires,
    different government agencies seemed to be battling each other more
    than they fought the blaze, he said.
    "In all my years going to various forest fires, I've noticed
    the change," he said.
    Because the fire is burning in a wilderness area, where
    motorized vehicles are prohibited, the northern front is being
    fought only from the air.
    Ground forces are deployed around the perimeter of the
    wilderness, hoping to keep the flames inside.
    The fire was started by lightning June 29, and so far has cost
    about $19 million to fight.
    The two other wildfires in Eastern Washington aren't nearly as
    worrisome.
    A fire on the Colville Indian Reservation north of Keller
    remained at 2,217 acres, and was 60 percent contained Thursday.
    There were 638 firefighters on the line, fire spokesman Noel Hardin
    said.
    The McGinnis Flats fire started July 18 and initial
    investigation has determined that it was human caused. The 1,064-acre Watt Road
    fire southwest of Cheney, near Spokane,
    was 90 percent contained Thursday, fire spokeswoman Josie Williams
    said.
    ---
    On the Net:
    Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center:
    www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  12. #12
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    7

    Post Contract Crews?

    Do you know of any contract crews in eastern Washington?

  13. #13
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Question

    I do not...however, there may be someone among the forums, who is in a better position to answer that question.

    Any takers? Someone in the Northwest?
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  14. #14
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post

    7/28/03

    (Undated-AP) -- A new wildfire west of Ellensburg has prompted
    evacuations of about 38 homes tonight.
    The so-called Highway 10 Fire began late this afternoon along
    Highway 10 and the North Fork Highway.
    The state Emergency Management Division says the evacuated homes
    are southeast of the town of Thorp.
    The fire is estimated to have burned about 300 acres so far,
    with winds of about 25 miles per hour.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  15. #15
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post More info

    By JOHN K. WILEY
    Associated Press Writer
    A new Kittitas County wildfire on the east slopes of the Cascade
    Mountains prompted the evacuation of about 38 homes Monday night, a
    Washington state emergency management spokesman said.
    The fire southeast of Thorp, west of Ellensburg, broke out
    Monday afternoon and had burned 300 acres by Monday night,
    spokesman Rob Harper said.
    The fire was reported 90 percent contained by late Monday night,
    and evacuees were gathered at a nearby staging area, awaiting the
    all-clear to return to their homes, he said.
    No injuries were reported and no structures were burned by the
    fire, which burned brush, timber and agricultural land.
    Kittitas County and state firefighters were battling the fire
    and additional fire units were dispatched from nearby counties,
    Harper said.
    The blaze prompted the temporary closure of a section of Highway
    10 Monday night. The state highway runs north of Interstate 90 in
    the area.
    Earlier Monday, a separate brush fire near Cle Elum, a few miles
    west of Thorp, forced the Washington State Patrol to close the
    westbound lanes of Interstate 90 about 85 miles east of Seattle for
    about an hour.
    In other Washington wildfire news, an elite Canadian
    firefighting crew was preparing to help fight a wildfire that is
    slowly burning toward the international border. However, safety
    concerns on Monday postponed the crew's arrival.
    "We're working on it today. There are a lot of logistics and
    safety considerations," Farewell Fire spokeswoman Kristi Covington
    said. "We're hoping for tomorrow, but that could change at any
    time."
    Officials had expected the 20-member Canadian hotshot crew to
    join the firefighting efforts on Monday, but the crew members'
    arrival in Washington was delayed by planning to ensure safety
    zones and escape routes, Covington said.
    More than 1,200 people were working the 69,962-acre fire north
    of Winthrop and east of Loomis on the eastern slopes of the Cascade
    Range in northcentral Washington state.
    American hotshot teams were preparing to battle the fire at two
    mountain passes inside the Pasayten Wilderness, about five miles
    south of the border, hoping to slow or stop the fire's spread
    toward Canada.
    Plans called for the 20-member Canadian team to join 60 U.S.
    hotshots preparing to make a stand on the fire's northwest flank.
    "If we can't hold it there, the fire will probably continue its
    run toward Canada along the Ashnola River drainage," fire
    spokesman Kent Romney said.
    The lightning-caused fire remained about 35 percent contained on
    Monday, with firebreaks mainly along the southern portions outside
    the wilderness.
    Most of the fire has burned within the 530,000-acre wilderness,
    which has no roads. Firefighting efforts there have been largely
    restricted to helicopters dropping water and retardant chemicals.
    The American and Canadian hotshots were to be the first crews on
    the fire lines inside the wilderness, fire spokesmen said.
    Crews were building two 6,000-gallon portable pools so
    helicopters could fill buckets or siphon retardant mixture without
    having to fly so far to refill, Romney said.
    One of the "heli-wells" was being built about 1.5 miles north
    of the border in Canada, Romney said.
    Canadian crews are no strangers to firefighting efforts south of
    the border, Mauragrace Healey of the Northwest Interagency
    Coordination Center in Portland, Ore., said Monday.
    There were 47 Canadian crews in the Pacific Northwest last year,
    she said. She said she believed the 20 Canadian hotshot crew
    members would be the first in the Northwest this season.
    "It's not uncommon when Canada has an especially fierce fire
    season that we help them out and, conversely, they help us out when
    we need it," she said.
    Regulations say that when a fire gets within five miles of the
    international border, crews from either side of the line can fight
    it, she said.
    Mopup continued Monday inside the McGinnis Flats fire on the
    Colville Indian Reservation, which produced the first fatality of
    this fire season in Washington state.
    The National Transportation Safety Board finished its on-scene
    investigation Monday of the helicopter crash on the 2,233-acre fire
    near Keller, spokesman Steve McCreary said from the agency's
    regional office in Seattle.
    Helicopter pilot Randall Harmon, 44, of Grants Pass, Ore., died
    Friday while dropping water on the fire from a Kaman K-1200
    helicopter.
    Authorities hoped to recover key pieces of wreckage by the end
    of the week, McCreary said.
    It is too early to determine a preliminary cause and could take
    six months or more before a cause is determined, he said.
    There have been no serious injuries from any of the other
    wildfires that have burned this summer in Washington. Those fires
    have charred more than 90,000 acres.
    The McGinnis Flats fire started July 18 and was being fought by
    more than 600 firefighters. Investigators said the fire, which was
    about 70 percent trailed, was caused by humans and had cost more
    than $4.2 million to fight.
    ---
    On the Net:
    Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center:
    www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/
    Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest: www.fs.fed.us/r6/oka
    Farewell Creek fire: www.fawnpeak.com
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  16. #16
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Oh Canada......

    SPOKANE (AP) - The 70,296-acre Farewell Creek fire in
    northcentral Washington burned through two wilderness passes
    Tuesday, dashing firefighters' best hopes of containing it before
    it reaches the Canadian border.
    On Tuesday afternoon "we lost the best opportunity to stop the
    forward movement at Ashnola (Pass)," said John Szulc, Farewell
    Creek zone one division supervisor.
    Barring significant weather change, he said, "options are
    limited for containment prior to reaching the Canadian border. We
    saw some amazing fire behavior."
    The lightning-caused fire also burned through Andrews Pass, said
    Kent Romney, a fire spokesman.
    The main objectives have been to keep the fire, now burning in
    the Pasayten Wilderness, from advancing into Canada, about five
    miles to the north, or into the Loomis State Forest, about five
    miles to the east. Firefighters had hoped to pinch off its northern
    advance at the two passes.
    No injuries were reported Tuesday in any of Washington's
    wildfires, burning over more than 80,000 acres.
    The Farewell Creek fire sent as many as 12 giant smoke plumes as
    high as 25,000 feet, Romney said. The smoke was visible on the west
    side of the Cascade Mountains and on Seattle and Spokane weather
    radar.
    A 20-person crew of Canadian hotshot firefighters arrived
    Tuesday night, and will be deployed Wednesday somewhere on the
    northwest flank, Romney said.
    The fire was about 35 percent contained, mostly in areas outside
    the 530,000-acre roadless wilderness.
    A giant portable pool of fire retardant is now operational in
    Canada, just 1.5 miles north of the border, so helicopters won't
    have to fly so far to fill up, Romney said.
    Another Eastern Washington wildfire has swept across more than
    12,000 acres in rural Lincoln County.
    Statewide fire service resources were mobilized Tuesday
    afternoon to support local crews working to contain the fire about
    13 miles south of Creston, west of Spokane.
    Washington State Patrol Chief Ronal Serpas authorized the use of
    state resources because of threats to crops and outbuildings as
    well as the extreme fire conditions.
    The fire burned within 20 feet of a couple of ranch houses but
    none was lost, spokesman Scott Boyd of the federal Bureau of Land
    Management said Tuesday night.
    About 170 firefighters were expected on that blaze on Wednesday.
    The fire is believed to have been started Sunday by the
    catalytic converter on a vehicle's exhaust system, Department of
    Natural Resources spokeswoman Kathy Helm said.
    The fire was burning on grassy range land owned by the BLM,
    Washington state and private residents, she said.

    In Asotin County in southeastern Washington, farmers and
    ranchers battled a range fire that grew to at least 1,344 acres
    before being contained Tuesday.
    A lightning strike sparked the blaze Saturday afternoon near
    Ayers Gulch, about seven miles from Asotin on property owned by the
    state Department of Fish and Wildlife.
    The fire burned mostly grass in the Asotin Creek Wildlife Area,
    though some homes were briefly threatened.
    Firefighters on Tuesday contained the 2,245-acre McGinnis Flats
    fire near Keller on the Colville Indian Reservation. A helicopter
    pilot died in a crash while dropping water on the fire on Friday.
    It was the first fatality of the state's wildfire season this year.
    Investigators have said the fire, which started July 18, was
    human-caused. More than 600 firefighters worked the blaze and some
    were being released to other assignments Tuesday. It has cost more
    than $4.8 million to fight so far.
    In Western Washington on Tuesday, a smoky fire burned over more
    than 20 acres of an 18-square-mile woodland training area at Fort
    Lewis, the sprawling Army base south of Tacoma. That blaze was
    fought by base personnel, Army spokesman Lt. Col. Stephen Barger
    said.
    There was no threat to people or structures. The cause was under
    investigation.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  17. #17
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post 7/30

    By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS
    Associated Press Writer
    SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters in Washington paused to
    remember a fallen comrade on Wednesday, then battled scorching heat
    and conditions so dry that any spark could instantly start a new
    wildfire.
    A memorial service was conducted at a fire camp for helicopter
    pilot Randall Harmon, of Grants Pass, Ore., who died in a crash
    last Friday while dropping water on the McGinnis Flats fire on the
    Colville Indian Reservation.
    He is the only Washington fatality in this summer's wildfire
    season; the crash remained under investigation.
    Triple-digit temperatures were the rule in much of Eastern
    Washington on Wednesday, leaving firefighters to battle heat
    exhaustion as well as flames.
    The National Weather Service on Wednesday afternoon issued a
    hazardous weather outlook to firefighters in Eastern Washington and
    northern Idaho. Unseasonably hot temperatures and very low humidity
    had produced a "red flag warning" in the region, the Weather
    Service said.
    "If a spark hits the ground, the probability is 80 to 100
    percent ignition," said information officer Deanna Raskovich, with
    the U.S. Forest Service at the giant Farewell Creek fire. "The
    live trees are drier than kiln-dried lumber now."
    Conditions are especially dangerous on the eastern slopes of the
    Cascade Range, and in the Okanogan Valley, the Weather Service
    said.
    The Farewell Creek fire in the Pasayten Wilderness of
    northcentral Washington grew about 2,000 acres on Wednesday to
    71,570 acres, and was being fought by more than 1,000 firefighters.
    "I don't know how it can get any warmer," Raskovich said.
    Temperatures reached 105 in her tent on Tuesday and 114 degrees
    inside the portable restrooms in the fire camp, Raskovich said.
    While this has been a below-average fire season so far
    nationally, that's not the case in Washington, said Jackie Denk, an
    information officer with the National Interagency Fire Center in
    Boise, Idaho.
    There have been 19 large fires so far in the state - described
    as those burning more than 100 acres in timber or 300 acres in
    grass. They have burned a total of 108,340 acres.
    For all of last year in Washington, there were 11 large fires,
    and they burned 74,013 acres, she said.
    The reason is unusually hot, dry weather this year, Denk said.
    "We are very concerned about the next few days because of high
    to extreme fire indexes we see in that area," Denk said. "The
    time is ripe for large fires to get started."
    Firefighters at the Farewell Creek fire on Wednesday were trying
    to strengthen the west flank of the fire. They can use only hand
    tools - not motorized vehicles - in a wilderness area, although
    aircraft are allowed to drop water, she said.
    Firefighters pulled out of the northern front of the fire,
    because weather conditions are too dangerous, she said.
    The 28 fire crews include a Canadian crew and two crews of elite
    Hotshots from the Southwest, she said.
    Efforts to prevent the fire from burning into Canada have likely
    failed, after the fire on Tuesday moved through two mountain passes
    in the wilderness, officials said.
    Across the border, the backcountry areas of Cathedral Provincial
    Park in British Columbia were closed to recreational use Wednesday
    because of the fire risk.
    The B.C. Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection said
    backcountry closures in the park would stay in effect until
    conditions improved. So-called "core areas" remained open,
    including Cathedral Lake lodge.
    The Farewell Creek fire was caused by lightning. It is about 35
    percent contained, mostly in areas outside the 530,000-acre
    roadless wilderness.
    Meanwhile, a 12,000-acre wildfire in rural Lincoln County was
    contained on Tuesday. No structures were lost and there were no
    injuries, officials said.
    For the second day in a row, a wildfire was burning on Fort
    Lewis, the sprawling Army base south of Tacoma in Western
    Washington.
    The new fire was reported Wednesday afternoon in Training Area
    Four, an area about a mile from Interstate 5. The size and cause of
    the fire were not immediately determined but Fort Lewis spokeswoman
    Brendalyn Carpenter said the Army was using its own personnel to
    fight it. No structures were threatened.
    Army personnel also were monitoring a fire that broke out
    Tuesday on another part of the base and was contained at roughly 30
    acres.
    Numerous other small fires have broken out all over Eastern
    Washington, and have mostly been quickly contained by local
    firefighters.
    ---
    On the Net:
    Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center:
    www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/
    Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest: www.fs.fed.us/r6/oka
    Farewell Creek fire: www.fawnpeak.com

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  18. #18
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Frewell

    WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Washington's largest fire burning near
    the Canadian border did not grow, as clouds and higher humidity
    helped firefighters gain an upper hand on the flames.
    The Farewell Creek fire, holding steady at 75,555 acres, was 57
    percent contained Sunday, said fire information officer Howard
    Hunter.
    "It has slowed down and it's just creeping at this point," he
    said.
    Some crews were being sent home as clouds and higher humidity
    forced the fire to slow down.
    Ten to 12 fire crews have been stationed inside the containment
    zone so they can be closer to the fire while they fight it, Hunter
    said. Meals were being flown into them daily.
    The Farewell Creek fire was started by lightning on June 29 and
    is about four miles from the Canadian border. It has cost nearly
    $29 million to fight.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  19. #19
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post 8/6

    OKANOGAN, Wash. (AP) - Investigators have arrested a man they
    allege is responsible for a fire that burned five homes in Okanogan
    last month.
    Michael D. Dick of Okanogan and Seattle was being held Wednesday
    in the Okanogan County Jail for investigation of first-degree
    arson.
    Bail was set at $100,000, a spokeswoman for the Okanogan County
    prosecutor said.
    Dick, 34, was arrested Tuesday evening in Seattle.
    Sheriff Frank Rogers said the 350-acre fire that caused $2.5
    million in damage to homes and orchards was started with a can of
    lighter fluid near Dick's home.
    Detectives spent two weeks investigating the fire scene and
    interviewing residents before they went to Seattle to search Dick's
    residence there and arrest him.
    Rogers said witnesses saw Dick across the street from a trailer
    where he was staying with relatives when the fire started.
    The lighter fluid can was found in the same place as the
    original point of ignition for the fire, Rogers said.
    If Dick is found guilty, he could be held liable for all of the
    monetary damages resulting from the fire.
    Early Wednesday, thunderstorms moved through Eastern Washington,
    unleashing more than 650 lightning strikes. The lightning started
    40 wildfires in the Okanogan and Wenatchee national forests, but
    most were small and quickly contained.
    The largest was the Butte fire, which burned 300 acres of grass
    and brush near the resort town of Chelan, Forest Service
    spokeswoman Robin DeMario said Wednesday.
    The fire posed no immediate threat to homes, she said.
    Many of the fires were in remote areas, and it was too early to
    estimate the total acreage burned, DeMario said.
    The storms bypassed the 77,039-acre Farewell Creek fire in the
    Pasayten Wilderness, the state's largest blaze. That fire is now 60
    percent contained, spokesman Mike Ferris said.
    The fire was started by lightning June 29 and is about four
    miles from the Canadian border. No major injuries or damage to
    structures have been reported.
    A fire was burning Wednesday night across approximately 1,000
    acres in the Juniper Dunes Wilderness Area in Franklin County, 15
    miles northeast of the Tri-Cities, said Scott Boyd, a fire
    management officer with the Bureau of Land Management.
    That blaze was believed sparked by lightning. No homes were
    threatened.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  20. #20
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post August 10th

    Pricetag for Farewell Creek blaze exceeds $35 million
    fonspoelljcpa1
    By The Associated Press
    The price tag for the state's largest wildfire, the 7-week-old
    Farewell Creek blaze in the federal Pasayten Wilderness in
    northcentral Washington, has reached $35 million and it's climbing.
    "Yes, it's pretty expensive," spokesman David Widmark of the
    Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.,
    said Sunday. "It's very expensive."
    Operations officials for different agencies pegged the exact
    figure for fighting the lightning-caused fire at $35,334,490 on
    Sunday.
    Meanwhile, the blaze that began June 29 increased to 81,000
    acres Sunday from 79,950 acres Saturday.
    "It's creeping and crawling along," Widmark said.
    There were 954 firefighters battling the fire, down from 1,053
    on Saturday. Containment remained at about 65 percent. Crews were
    aided by 13 helicopters dropping water and retardants.
    "We have had some fire crew rotations," Widmark said. "We
    take firefighters off after 14 days."
    The fire is burning primarily in lodgepole pine and subalpine
    fir at the 6,000-foot elevation of the Cascade Mountains.
    The 5,200-acre Juniper Dunes Wilderness fire, ignited by a
    lightning strike Wednesday 14 miles northeast of Pasco, was 95
    percent contained Sunday.
    "It will be contained tonight," Widmark said. "We will have a
    fire line completely around it."
    A crew of 103 people were fighting the lightning-caused fire on
    Bureau of Land Management land in wheat fields, sagebrush and
    grass, but Widmark said firefighters were doing mop-up work and
    would begin to come off the lines later in the day. No more
    helicopter water drops were scheduled there Sunday.
    Despite additional rainfall early Sunday, about 25 small fires,
    including the 50-acre Gold Hill fire about two miles southeast of
    Darrington, were still burning in heavily timbered areas of the
    Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in Skagit and Snohomish
    counties.
    Those blazes - dubbed the North Zone Complex Fire - were set off
    by lightning storms late Tuesday and early Wednesday. There were
    210 firefighters fighting them Sunday, Widmark said.
    In Spokane on Sunday, the city Fire Department mopped up a
    wind-driven fire on the bluff bordering the South Hill.
    The fire began Saturday afternoon - its cause was unknonwn - on
    a steep hillside below High Drive. Light winds from the southwest
    and west fanned the flames up the dry slope and toward the street.
    For a time, the fire poured smoke into a residential
    neighborhood, briefly blowing up a wall of flame that sent
    firefighters and spectators running.
    Neighborhood resident Eric Penar watched the fire crest the
    hill.
    "The sky turned almost black, then a firefighter came
    scrambling up on all fours, another firefighter pulled him over the
    barricade and then there was just this wall of flame," Penar told
    The Spokesman-Review of Spokane. He estimated the flames at 7 to 9
    feet tall.
    Meanwhile, a string of suspicious wildfires plagued Kittitas and
    Yakima counties, prompting authorities to form a
    multijurisdictional task force in hopes of finding a suspect,
    Debbie Robinson, fire prevention coordinator for the Department of
    Natural Resources and task force spokeswoman, told the Daily Record
    of Ellensburg.
    "We want to stop any new (fire) starts and heighten public
    awareness," Robinson said. "We need the public's help. We can't
    be everywhere at once."
    Because of the high number of fires, locations and start times,
    many have been labeled suspicious - possible arsons.
    "All of these fires, both in Kittitas and Yakima counties, have
    been in open areas with grassy hills so they spread quickly,"
    Robinson said.
    "All of them are suspicious on how they started. If it is a
    natural start, there are tell-tale signs. A fair amount of these
    fires have started close to the road. That is not a usual place for
    a fire to start."
    There have been 25 rural fires in Kittitas County since the end
    of May, Kittitas County Fire Marshal Derald Gaidos said. Since May
    23, more than 1,600 acres have burned.
    Four of the fires were confirmed as started by fireworks. One
    was started by a vehicle backfiring. The cause of the others was
    unknown.
    "We need the public to get descriptions of the vehicles driving
    by or staying in the area of a fire," Robinson said. "Notice if
    someone is taking pictures. Pay attention to the weather. The color
    of the smoke will tell us if it was a natural start or if an
    accelerant was used."

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  21. #21
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post 8/18

    CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - On the ground and from the air, about 200
    firefighters and support staff worked to slow the advance of the
    Togo Mountain fire in the Colville National Forest.
    Better mapping revealed Sunday that the fire was 3,000 acres and
    growing - about 1,000 acres larger than fire officials had believed
    the day before, said Elaine Paladino, a national forest
    spokeswoman.
    Three helicopters and three air tankers were dropping water on
    the fire, which was sparked by lightning and was first reported
    Friday. It was burning in heavy timber on steep terrain about 15
    miles northeast of Curlew, about one-half mile from the Canadian
    border.
    Five water tenders, five bulldozers and six engines were being
    used on the ground.
    "No homes or structures are threatened at this point, but
    there's no estimated time of containment, either," Paladino said.
    Canadian crews were keeping an eye on the blaze on the other
    side of the border in British Columbia, and were letting fire crews
    take water from Christina Lake near Grand Forks, Paladino said.
    Meanwhile, crews fighting the state's other major wildfires
    reported progress.
    In Stevens County near Northport, the Black Canyon fire remained
    about 70 percent contained at nearly 2,280 acres, said Heather
    Cole, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
    On Saturday, fire bosses said they were concerned that dry
    lightning in the forecast could complicate firefighting efforts.
    "Actually, we were very fortunate. We didn't get any dry
    lightning, and the winds weren't up to what we had originally
    expected," Cole said. "It basically blew over us."
    Nearly 1,000 firefighters and support personnel were working the
    fire, which was burning in rocky slopes.
    In Snohomish County, east of Darrington, the largest in a
    complex of about two dozen fires reached 90 percent containment on
    Sunday, fire spokeswoman Cindy White said.
    The 170-acre Gold Hill fire had not grown in days, and most of
    the other fires are no bigger than an acre.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  22. #22
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post 8/18

    CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - More than 500 firefighters worked Monday to
    slow the advance of the Togo Mountain fire, burning in the Colville
    National Forest near the Canadian border.
    Fire managers in both the United States and Canada coordinated
    efforts to fight the blaze, which had grown to about 4,100 acres
    Monday, spokesman Nick Mickel said.
    No structures were immediately threatened, but residents of 61
    homes and farms just north of the border in Canada have been put on
    evacuation alert, spokeswoman Diana Baxter said Monday night.
    The town of Grand Forks, British Columbia, is about five miles
    north of the fire.
    "We accomplished quite a bit of work in the area today,"
    Baxter said, adding water tenders and bulldozers were assisting
    firefighters in the ground attack.
    Several helicopters also dropped water, she said.
    The fire was just 5 percent contained on Monday, Baxter said.
    The lightning-sparked blaze was first reported Friday. It was
    burning in heavy timber on steep terrain about 15 miles northeast
    of Curlew, about one-half mile from the Canadian border.
    Canadian crews were keeping an eye on the blaze on the other
    side of the border and were letting U.S. fire crews take water from
    Christina Lake near Grand Forks, national forest spokeswoman Elaine
    Paladino said.
    Meanwhile, crews fighting the state's other major wildfires
    reported progress.
    In Stevens County near Northport, the Black Canyon fire was
    about 80 percent contained at nearly 2,280 acres, said Heather
    Cole, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
    Nearly 1,000 firefighters and support personnel were working the
    fire, which was burning in rocky slopes.
    In Snohomish County, east of Darrington, the 170-acre Gold Hill
    fire was contained early Monday, fire spokeswoman Cindy White said.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  23. #23
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post August 19th

    CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - A wildfire edged closer to the Canadian
    border on Tuesday, but a joint U.S.-Canadian firefighting effort
    slowed its advance.
    Fire managers in the United States and Canada were both working
    on the Togo Mountain Fire, which grew by 200 acres to 4,300 acres
    on Tuesday, said fire spokeswoman Diana Baxter of the Colville
    National Forest.
    The growth occurred as embers rolled to the bottom of small
    ravines and ignited fuels on the northern fire boundary.
    The fire is about half a mile south of the Canadian border, and
    five miles south of the town of Grand Forks, British Columbia.
    No structures were immediately threatened, but residents of 61
    homes north of the border in Canada remained on evacuation alert,
    Baxter said.
    A bulldozer from Canada built a firebreak from the Canadian
    border to Independence Creek on the U.S. side, Baxter said.
    Winds were making conditions difficult for firefighters, but
    there were no injuries, she said.
    The lightning-sparked blaze was first reported Friday. It was
    burning in heavy timber on steep terrain about 15 miles northeast
    of Curlew.
    In Stevens County near Northport, the Black Canyon fire was
    about 85 percent contained at nearly 2,280 acres. Firefighters are
    protecting 183 homes. Nearly 1,000 firefighters and support
    personnel were working the fire, which was burning on rocky slopes.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  24. #24
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post August 21st

    CARNATION, Wash. (AP) - Several spot wildfires burned across
    brush, grass and trees near this Snoqualmie Valley town Thursday,
    destroying one barn and moving down a hillside toward a cluster of
    homes.
    Flames at the north end of Tolt River Road were across the road
    from the 100-home Swiftwater development, said Josie Williams, a
    spokeswoman for Eastside Fire and Rescue.
    The fire area was estimated at 40 to 50 acres by King County
    officials. Williams said about 200 homes were threatened in all.
    "The fire is slowing down a bit," she said Thursday evening,
    about two hours after the flames were first reported.
    There were no reports of injuries and no indication any animals
    had been in the barn that burned.
    No evacuations were ordered, Williams said, but nearby residents
    were alerted and ready to go. Some residents voluntarily left their
    homes.
    Other homeowners grabbed garden hoses and put out spot fires in
    grass near their backyards.
    Mayor Stuart Lisk said Thursday evening that fire officials told
    him the main wildfire was 50 percent contained. Several spot fires
    were extinguished earlier.
    There was no immediate word on the cause of the fires near this
    community about 25 miles east of Seattle.
    The rural area near the Tolt River in eastern King County
    includes houses, forested areas and fields with livestock.
    Firefighters from Carnation and other departments took a
    defensive position, laying hoses from hydrants along Tolt River
    Road and filling up water tankers, Williams said.
    A helicopter scooped water from nearby Lake Langlois and dumped
    it on the flames.
    Michelle DeBacker of Carnation said her neighbors left the
    River's Edge neighborhood one mile from State Route 203 in east
    Carnation. She said the fire was burning on land logged several
    years ago.
    "We're leaving right now," Kaisa Soptich told The Associated
    Press by telephone, just before leaving her home in the Swiftwater
    development. She said the fire was "burning real close."
    Another nearby resident, Karen Barnes, told KOMO-TV she and her
    neighbors had put valuables in their cars but were taking a "wait
    and see" approach to whether they should leave their homes.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  25. #25
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post August 24th

    CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - Cooler, damper weather Sunday helped crews
    make progress on the Togo fire burning in northeastern Washington
    about a half mile from the Canadian border.
    The blaze was about 50 percent contained at 5,137 acres, fire
    spokesman Nick Mickel said.
    More than 900 firefighters and support personnel were working on
    burnouts - setting fire to the vegetation between the blackened
    areas and the containment lines encircling the fire to make sure it
    doesn't grow.
    "We hope to accomplish the burnout on the east flank of the
    fire," said Stan Hinatsu, a fire information officer. "This is
    the last critical day for us."
    No structures were threatened, and there were no reports of any
    injuries.
    Shifting winds sent haze toward Republic Sunday morning. By
    afternoon, columns of smoke were visible from Grand Forks, British
    Columbia, with parts of the town remaining on standby for
    evacuation.
    West of the Cascades, crews continued to work on three small
    fires in Mount Rainier National Park. The fires, ignited by
    lightning on Aug. 5, had burned about 35 acres and were roughly 25
    percent contained.
    State Route 123 remained closed between Stevens Canyon Entrance
    and Cayuse Pass. Shriner Peak and Deer Creek trailheads also were
    closed because of the fires.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register