1. #1
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    Lightbulb Electrical burns????

    how would you treat someone with an electrical burn? Do you treat it diferently depending on the voltage (obviously you would, but what is it)?? my brother is an electrician and he was just wondering.
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    Which of the 3 are you talking about ?

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    3 what?
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    Well there is the thermal from the flames of the stuff burning. An arc burn from the it flashing and touching your skin kind of like getting a jolt. Then there is true contact which is where the electricty enters through one part and exits any where else on your body ie:comes in your hand and exits through your foot.

    First make sure that they are no longer in contact with the wires or energized. If it is indoors,unplug the item or shut off at panel---outdoors call power company.

    Check ABC's

    If the victim has fallen check and treat as a spinal injury

    Treat victim for shock ie: evevating the legs about a foot in the air---that is if there is no spinal injury suspected. Try covering victim with a blanket to prevent heat loss.

    Hand off to ems

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    Originally posted by dfdex1
    If the victim has fallen check and treat as a spinal injury

    Treat victim for shock ie: evevating the legs about a foot in the air---that is if there is no spinal injury suspected. Try covering victim with a blanket to prevent heat loss.

    Hand off to ems

    Any electrical burn that a person sustains, because there is voltage involved, is and should always be treated as spinal. The muscle contractions the body endures can adversely affect the spine.

    You would treat the entrance and exit wounds to the best of your ability AFTER ensuring that the pt had a clear airway, adequate breathing and circulation. These pt's will have O2 administered to them as well.

    ALL pt's who have come into contact with electricity are in the RAPID TRANSPORT category. Even if they "seem" fine they are not, the electrical jolt messes with the natural electrical impulses of the heart and MUST be checked by a qualified doctor.

    Jesse you have a point regarding the "flash burns", but the only flash burns I've ever heard of involve welders, generally involving their eyes. For these burns the best you can do is have the pt lie down if they are not already and apply cold compresses, ensure that they are comfortable and not shocky. The main thing here is to cool the burn, and while most minor burns can be immersed in cool water, eyes can't so you use compresses.
    Last edited by PFire23; 07-09-2003 at 11:19 AM.
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    PFire23 basically has it covered. Add in regarding the eyes allows cover both eyes even if just one is injured.
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    Also that any significant electrical shock should be medically assessed and probably monitored. Strongly encourage any person suffering a significant shock to be medically assessed in a facility that is capable of monitoring cardiac activity.

    Electrical shocks can be nasty for not only what they can immediately present with, but also what can present in later stages.

    Bottom lineO NOT ACCEPT REFUSAL OF CARE WITHOUT COVERING EVERY POSSIBLE ANGLE YOU CAN!! (especially your gluteal area )

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    I really dont know what im talking about here but what about smaller shocks, enought to hurt but not enought to send you to the hospital? or all shocks and burns a concern for medical care?
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    Wannabe, as far as I know ANY electrical burn, no matter how insignificant should be seen by medical professionals. As Lady said, symptoms may not present until later, but the current affects the heart. The heart is operated by electrical impulses, so when an outside electrical source enters the body it throws off the natural impulses within the heart. So even if the pt is not serious enough to need to be transported by ambulance, they should still be taken in to be checked out by a qualified doctor, as Lady said (again)someone who is able to monitor heart rhythms and function.
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    Default Cardiac Monitoring For Electrical Shock Pts

    In addition to all the normal burn care that PFire & others have described very well, any electrical shock pt. should get ALS (medics) if available. This patient needs to be placed on a cardiac monitor. Normal house current (110 V, 60hz) is perhaps the most dangerous current because of the way it can interfere with normal cardiac function.

    All patients should be transported for evaluation. If dysrhythmias are present, the medics can start the appropriate drug therapy. If no medics are available, the patient should be treated like any other potential cardiac patient - high flow O2 & transport. Watch the pt's pulse, BP, and overall mental status closely.
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    Everything covered well. There is also a burn injury one can receive from higher voltages arcing through the air. This normally occurs at the high stuff, 7000 volts and up (such as in transformer vaults and panels for industrial and heavy commercial properties). If the flow is interrupted improperly, either by a broken or failing wire or fuse; or by a malfunctioning switch; or by improper contact, these high voltages can create such a tremendous arc as to flash burn everything around the site. The more voltage, the greater the flash. This phenomenon also occurs at household voltages (220v) such as when meters are improperly pulled. The results at high voltages are usually quite dramatic.

    (These are graphic photos)
    Flash burns
    Exit Wound
    Flash Burns

    This site also has a fascinating series of photos of an accidental electorcution (suicide attempt) that really demonstrates what high voltage can do, but I couldn't get to it.
    Last edited by jaybird210; 07-09-2003 at 01:52 PM.
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    Thanks for your help! the bro thanks you too.
    I havent failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work.

    - Thomas Edison

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    If you want to see a real electricution then you should buy or rent Faces of Death part I. they show this man getting electrocuted in the "chair". they had to tape his eyes so they wouldnt pop out.

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    yo jaybird i was looking around that site at the pictures of the accidents and electrocutions....oh man that is some sick and twisted sh*t.Like i said before you want to watch some real f***ed up sh*t then get faces of death any of will make ur stomach churn.

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    In response to the lingering results of electrical current/burns, there is usually more than just the heart to worry about as well.

    The point of treating all electrocutions as spinal is very important. The spinal cord runs down the entire body, and is subsequently a good conductor. The current often damages the cord, and the nervous system to some extent as well. Paralysis is not necessarily present, but spinal swelling can follow shortly after.

    I have treated several electrocutions (most recently an electrician), and they can end up with chronic muscle spasms and Kidney problems that never completely disappear.

    It is not limited to high voltages either. A staff member here at the resort was quite nearly killed a few years back when he received a 110v electrocution from household extension cord he was using in the snow. He did suffer kidney problems for several months, and still has nervous system problems.
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    I can tell you the facts of an electrical contact. June 30 I was at my FD using the aerial to was tha parking lot at the station off (giving the truck it's Monday workout and getting in some working with the aerial manuverability) as we finished I had shut the water down and started to open the tank fill(since I was on the Hydrant), When I did somehow there was either contact or the proximity barrier was broken by the guy on the controls but I took a 7200V shock as I tried to open the tank fill.

    The Doc in the ER said that electricity has a choice of travel either through or over you, mine went over (as he said, "you got lucky"). I did not have any immediate effects other than muscle spasms. I was kept over night to monitor my heart. 3 days after the spasms increased a bit and I know have some problems with concentration. I went back to the Doc this past Tuesday and now will see a neurologist at the earliest I can get an appointment. My doc said,"electrocution has no cause and effect (fall and break a leg), that it could effect anything in the body and not at the istance of injury, it could be some time later"

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