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  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Fire related news-For you NASCAR fans and FF teams

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) - In the wake of fiery crashes over the
    last two months, NASCAR said Wednesday that all vehicles in its
    three top series will soon have a fire-extinguishing cylinder in
    the fuel cell area.
    Winston Cup drivers Ken Schrader, Dale Jarrett, Ryan Newman and
    Bobby Labonte were forced to scramble from their burning cars.
    The new requirement will go into effect for the Winston Cup,
    Busch and Craftsman Truck series beginning Aug. 13. But NASCAR was
    recommending teams adopt the change immediately.
    "We've been working diligently on fire prevention and fire
    containment at the NASCAR Research and Development Center over the
    last few months," said Gary Nelson, head of the R&D operation.
    "After researching and testing various systems, we felt this was
    the most viable one for containment of potential fires coming from
    the fuel cell area."
    With this system, the extinguisher releases Halon, a proven fire
    suppressant, in the area of the blazer. Halon is a liquefied
    compressed gas that stops the spread of fire by chemically
    disrupting combustion.
    It will be an automatic system but also will have an override
    from the driver-activated system already located in cockpit.
    In addition to the fire extinguisher cylinder being added for
    the fuel cell area, NASCAR has enhanced its requirements and
    specifications for the current on-board driver system as well as
    the fuel cell vent area.
    "While researching this issue, we also identified other areas
    that could be improved by modifying the requirements or
    specifications for the teams," Nelson said. "We were able to make
    improvements to the driver and fuel cell/trunk compartments, and
    identify the best ways to install and apply the technology during
    this process."
    In a related project, NASCAR will conduct a test of its
    alternate exit, more commonly known as the roof hatch, on Aug. 6.
    The Midwest Roadside Facility in Lincoln, Neb., will conduct a
    crash test that will simulate a rollover-type accident.
    Nelson said a successful test could lead to a recommendation of
    the safety component by NASCAR to teams in the Cup and Busch
    series.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com


  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Gordon speaks out......

    By JENNA FRYER
    AP Sports Writer
    CONCORD, N.C. (AP) - Four-time Winston Cup champion Jeff Gordon
    asked NASCAR to improve its safety crews, joining a growing list of
    drivers unsatisfied with the current rescue efforts.
    Gordon became angry after Sunday's race in Watkins Glen, N.Y.,
    when rescue workers were slow to get to him following his wreck
    near the finish line.
    Once the crew got onto the track, the ambulance drove toward his
    car instead of Gordon, who was already walking away. He angrily
    gestured for the crew to come get him.
    Then, the ride to the care center was in bumper-to-bumper fan
    traffic because there was no clear route for the ambulance to take.
    "I was pretty upset at how long it took me to get to the
    infield care center, and I talked to NASCAR about it," Gordon said
    Tuesday. "I feel like they heard me loud and clear, and I think
    they know there is an issue here.
    "And its unfortunate that we're being reactive instead of
    proactive."
    Gordon's complaints are just the latest from drivers and car
    owners.
    Bobby Labonte and Dale Jarrett were furious over slow response
    times when they were involved in fiery accidents. Ryan Newman said
    the crew that responded to him after he flipped at Watkins Glen on
    Friday was unsure how to help him get out of the car.
    "They were definitely late," Newman said. "It was pretty
    ridiculous. When they got there, they didn't know what they were
    doing."
    Unlike most other major racing series, NASCAR uses local
    emergency medical technicians as safety workers instead of a
    full-time traveling crew. Full-time crews are familiar with
    drivers' medical histories and have thorough experience in
    responding to wrecks.
    NASCAR defends its system and notes that it holds training
    seminars for the local crews. Part of the reason it takes crews so
    long to respond is because they have to wait for the cars to
    complete the lap and race back to the caution car before NASCAR
    officials dispatch them to the scene.
    Gordon wants more.
    "We need to know that they are properly trained, properly
    informed and prepared," he said. "I want to see trained guys that
    go to a course away from that race track and are prepared to deal
    with every situation."
    Other series use advanced scoring systems that "freeze" the
    field when an accident happens, prohibiting cars from racing back
    to the finish line and allowing the rescue crews immediate access
    to the track and the wreck.
    "Racing back to the yellow is an issue and if we're not working
    on it now, we should be working on a computer program to freeze the
    field so we don't have to race back," Gordon said.
    Car owner Richard Childress doesn't think that's the answer.
    "Each situation is different and sometimes some are a lot
    tougher," Childress said. "If the pack is still coming, the cars
    are still racing and are going to be strung out. Slowing them down
    is going to make it longer to get them all together and make it
    safe for the rescue crew.
    "The quicker the cars get back there to the yellow, the quicker
    the crews can get out there."

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  3. #3
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    I thought Halon was illegal for new installs do to its effect on the enviroment? How do they keep the driver from suffocating?

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber E229Lt's Avatar
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    Default

    How do they keep the driver from suffocating?
    Suffocating is Okay, as long as he doesn't get burned.

    The agent is in the fuel cell area, not the drivers compartment.

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