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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Question Quints/Ladders etc. Single/Tandem Axles Pros/Cons

    Wandering the pros and cons on single axle vs. tandem. How close to GVW with a single axle? Manuvering a tandem? We are replacing our an older Engine. We have a total of three and want to keep it that way however we are needing a ladder as well. In order to stay in buget, room in the firehouse, and keep 3 Engine's we decided to look into purchasing a Quint. We want to be able to use it as the third Engine when necessary but have a ladder (75'-100') when we need it as well. Our ? is we were looking at a single axle, 75' stick, with a pump, 500 gallon tank, with some compartment space (reallizing we have sacrifice some) but are starting to wander if this is a good idea or not due to weight and room? Please help us out!!! If you would not mind us contacting you for future questions/comments please provide an e-mail, phone, etc. & for us to look at some apparatus give us your Department website! Thanks for your time and input!


  2. #2
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    Cranford, NJ, USA
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    Default

    One other thing that needs to be considered, That the truck as
    speced and built will meet your states motor vehicle axle and weight requirements. some states have very strict standards.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Checked out a single axle 70' midmount platform yesterday, know any goods/bads?

  4. #4
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    Sep 2003
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    Stevens Point, WI
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    Lightbulb Quint Single vs Dual

    We spec'd and purchased a single axle 75' quint. The vehicle and axle ratings were as expected. As equipment was added, (water,tools, hose, PEOPLE) we found that we were coming too close to max GVW. Not by axle ratings have you...ability to get tires that will support the ratings of the axle was the problem. A change in the vehicle was requested by our department and a pusher axle was placed to lessen the load. A 15" pusher axle was placed ahead of the rear duals with an adjustable downforce depending on equipment placement.

    We also trialed several ladders prior to making our decision. Being from Wisconsin, ALF, Pierce, Seagrave, Marion, Darley, Monroe, US Tanker, and Custom are close for trial purposes.

    The bonus is that we do have a roll out 1000' LDH tray that allows us to rebed LDH without climbing on the truck and what we feel is the best ladder in the industry (AI).

    My suggestion is to write a VERY DETAILED PERFORMANCE SPEC. Make the Mfg companies provide the equipment to perform what you want it to!

    JB

  5. #5
    Forum Member tripperff's Avatar
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    Nov 2002
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    Default I have to agree with Wrench

    You need to make sure the loaded (equipment, water, people) truck meets your state's DOT requirements. And don't expect the manufacturer to make sure it will meet those requirements. A Fire Dept. near me got a truck delivered and after a couple sets of brakes they got the truck weighed and found it was well overweight on the rear axle. I won't mention the manufacturer. Another little thing we learned the hard way was about Tow Eyes. We got our heavy rescue stuck once and when the tow truck went to pull it out a tow eye broke off and tore up the bumper pretty bad. Since then we learned to Specify that the tow eyes had to support the LOADED WEIGHT of the truck.
    Last edited by tripperff; 09-06-2003 at 02:58 PM.
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  6. #6
    Forum Member Fire304's Avatar
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    From a manuverability standpoint, newer tandoms have progressed a long ways. We are running a 2001 95' E-One tower quint which weighs in at 73,000lbs. This truck is long and big, but it will out turn our older engine! Our old single screw ladder didn't come close to this turning ability. We can do a 360 degree turn on our apron (maybe 60 X 100' including the road) with room to spare. It is hard on the rear tires, and will tear up soft asphalt, but thats the trade off. My understanding is that the Pierce All-Steer reduces the turning radius even further.

    While I have no personal experiance with single screw quints, all the ones I've seen appear to be horribly overweight or extreme light on the amount of gear they carried.
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  7. #7
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    Nov 2002
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    Default

    Hello, I have a question for everyone to ponder. There are so many rescue pumpers out there, why are they not over weight. Same basic senerio as the single axle quint. Now hear me out. A lot of resuce pumpers hold 1000 of water, most quints hold 4-500 gallons that right there is a saving a of about 4200lbs. Most rescue pumpers can hold more or the same amount of equipment as a quint so theres not differnce there. They have the same size axles with the same over all GVW ratings. My department is looking into a rescue quint. We only have 2 engines and a current quint with is 32 years old, and a home made rescue job. So our plan is to get a single axle quint with 400 h2o and 1500+ pump, with a compliment of rescue tools on one side and a compliment of truck co. tools on the other side. It will run first due with a bus on mva's as a sinle unit with suppresion capabilities for fire control during tool jobs and for fuel spills, and it will run 2nd due as a truck co. for your every day fire calls. So tell me, why all the talk about single axle quints and no talk about rescue pumpers?

  8. #8
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    Maybe they are overweight because we add more than the equipment allowance for the axles. The rigs don't get overweight, we make them overweight.

    Also, not all quints come with the largest axles, ie E-One because the largest axles have squeeky brakes and they avoid that.

  9. #9
    Forum Member Fire304's Avatar
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    Default

    This is just a guess, but an educated one, but I'd say the big long sticky thing which sits on top of the quint adds a lot of weight to it. In addition to the ladder itself, you need all the support structure which would not be found on a pumper plus the outriggers which are huge chunks of metal. I imagine that plus the various electrical and hydraulic systems which must be installed to operate the stick eat up a sizable portion of the truck's weight.

    We also run a Saulsbury/E-One rescue pumper, and it is a 53,000lbs GVWR single axle (it actually has a heavier footprint than the tandom quint even though it is 20K lighter). Neither truck runs over weight, but both are close to the max (the quint more so than the pumper).
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