1. #1
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    Default eyeglasses with mask?

    Are you able to wear glasses with the scba mask on?

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    Default SCBA w/ glasses

    I can't speak for any other brands, but I do know that Scott manufactures a special snap-in insert that retains a pair of glasses. The glass' frames are a specific shape. If you bring them to your eye doctor, they can properly order your current prescription cut to suit these frames. The insert is easily removable if you don't have your own mask to use. The cost is approximately $27 and can usually be purchased from any Scott authorized dealer. The lenses are extra. You may want to consider having your department purchase the insert and lenses for you, if they have enough funding.

    Stay safe.
    Jonathan Martin
    martinj@wpi.edu
    WPI Mechanical Engineering
    "Be safe, use smoke detectors...be safer, sleep with a firefighter..."

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    Default

    You might also go see your local military/reserve unit. For years they have been using modified glasses with a thin elastic band that is designed to fit under a gas mask. They are ugly as hell, but If they seal well enough for a military fit test, I would suspect they might work for your BA as well.

    As always, try before you buy.
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

    IACOJ

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    Default Glasses

    We had a member of our department have the laser eye surgery, and I became the lucky recipient of his mask with the glasses insert in them. All I did was take them to my eye doctor and get the prescription lenses put in them.
    "The uniform is supposed to say something about you. You get it for nothing, but it comes with a history, so do the right thing when you're in it."
    Battalion Chief Ed Schoales
    from 'Report from Ground Zero' pg 149
    I.A.C.O.J. Member

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    Default No Penetrations!

    OSHA regulations and NFPA guidelines no longer allow the facepiece seal to have any penetrations. All SCBA manufacturers have provisions for facepiece spectacles/glasses kits. The US Military, as well, no longer allows penetrations of the seal. The standard issue M-40 chemical/bio mask has a spectacle kit as well. Your fire department is responsible for providing these if you are an OSHA state. Have them purchase the appropriate kit from the SCBA vendor. Then take the kit, and a copy of your most recent prescription to an industrial eyewear vendor. Mine usually cost about 50 bucks to make.


    FTM-PTB-EGH-RFB!

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    Default

    I know in Oz under AS1715 you can't have any penetrations on the seal including hair, glasses, clothes, etc...

    Surely NFPA would be the same????

    Scott manufactures a special snap-in insert that retains a pair of glasses.
    Sounds interesting- never heard of it.....
    Luke

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    Default

    Thanks for gettin back to me guys. you are all a big help.

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    In Jan of this year had LASIK surgery, and love it. I always wore a small bowed pair of glasses before that DID NOT affect my seal. But it is much better with the surgery !
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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    i wouldnt mind gettin lazer surgey. i'm not too blind but it would be nice to not have to wear glasses to drive at night and stuff like that. think i'll wait until they perfect it alittle more though. how much does that cost?

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    I've used Survivair for the last five years in the VFD I'm a member of. I purchased my own mask and spectacle kit years ago so that I could see and not have to share germs with others. It was a tad bit flimsy, but held up well.
    At work we use SCOTT SCBAs. I purchased a spectacle kit for the SCOTT, it works real well, rides a bit tight over the bridge of my nose, but at least I can see.
    This year the VFD invested in many new SCBAs and masks for everyone. We went with the 20/20 face pieces. Instead of using the old Survivair insert that I already had with lenses attatched I purchased a SCOTT insert for the 20/20 mask.
    It works well, much more durable then the older one, but rides just a tad funny. Nothing that will affect my job, or my safety.

    Most every maker has something to use for the face piece.

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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    it was $1000.00/eye
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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    Default

    Have you tried contacts?


    I love 'em

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    Default Just curious???

    Some of you have stated "I bought my own mask".....or 'I bought my own spectacle kit...."

    The question is, why? Why would you buy something that your employer (even if you are a volunteer, you are still technically/legally considered an "employee" regarding OSHA/NIOSH and insurance regulations) is legally responsible for providing for you? As an employee, your employer is legally responsible for providing respiratory protection. This includes eyewear for those who require it.....Without prejudice, may I add!

    Under regulation, each employee is supposed to have his/her own mask. Additionally, you are also required to undergo fit testing every 6 months. I know a lot of volunteer departments get away without hoving to undergo these requirements........

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    Default No contacts!!!!

    cmjones: Somewhere within the regulations, the use of contact lenses is specifically prohibited. This is due to particulate matter in any firefighting environment, as well as high amounts of heat. I used to wear contacts back when I first became a member of my volunteer department- BAD IDEA! Speaking from experience, I can say that contacts, while a member of a fairly busy outfit, suck! I cant tell you the number of times I had to go to EMS and get a bottle of sterile saline to wash out my eyes.

    I also work part time in Industrial Safety- there are also many professions in industry where the use of contacts is also prohibited.

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    Under regulation, each employee is supposed to have his/her own mask.
    What regulation? I have seen none that state this. I have only seen where each member needs to have access to a mask and be fit tested in each style they may wear.

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    Default

    Contact lenses were once prohibited by OSHA but that has changed with the new Respiratory Protection Standard. (They had stopped enforcing it several years earlier) That said, FWDbuff does bring up some good points about the disadvantages of contact lenses in certain situations.

    The MAG eyeglasses described by MCALDWELL are prohibited by OSHA even though they are popular in some departments.

    Your best bets are the mask inserts or corrective surgery.
    Last edited by HM604OH; 09-11-2003 at 12:40 PM.

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    Default 29 CFR 1910.134

    29 CFR 1910.134 (F) (5)


    This section applies to General Industry (part 1910), Shipyards (part 1915), Marine Terminals (part 1917), Longshoring (part 1918), and Construction (part 1926).

    ..1910.134(a)

    (a) Permissible practice.

    (a)(1) In the control of those occupational diseases caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, the primary objective shall be to prevent atmospheric contamination. This shall be accomplished as far as feasible by accepted engineering control measures (for example, enclosure or confinement of the operation, general and local ventilation, and substitution of less toxic materials). When effective engineering controls are not feasible, or while they are being instituted, appropriate respirators shall be used pursuant to this section.

    (a)(2) Respirators shall be provided by the employer when such equipment is necessary to protect the health of the employee. The employer shall provide the respirators which are applicable and suitable for the purpose intended. The employer shall be responsible for the establishment and maintenance of a respiratory protection program which shall include the requirements outlined in paragraph (c) of this section.

    ..1910.134(b)

    (b) Definitions. The following definitions are important terms used in the respiratory protection standard in this section.

    Air-purifying respirator means a respirator with an air-purifying filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific air contaminants by passing ambient air through the air-purifying element.

    Assigned protection factor (APF) [Reserved]

    Atmosphere-supplying respirator means a respirator that supplies the respirator user with breathing air from a source independent of the ambient atmosphere, and includes supplied-air respirators (SARs) and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) units.

    Canister or cartridge means a container with a filter, sorbent, or catalyst, or combination of these items, which removes specific contaminants from the air passed through the container.

    Demand respirator means an atmosphere-supplying respirator that admits breathing air to the facepiece only when a negative pressure is created inside the facepiece by inhalation.

    Emergency situation means any occurrence such as, but not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment that may or does result in an uncontrolled significant release of an airborne contaminant.

    Employee exposure means exposure to a concentration of an airborne contaminant that would occur if the employee were not using respiratory protection.

    End-of-service-life indicator (ESLI) means a system that warns the respirator user of the approach of the end of adequate respiratory protection, for example, that the sorbent is approaching saturation or is no longer effective.

    Escape-only respirator means a respirator intended to be used only for emergency exit.

    Filter or air purifying element means a component used in respirators to remove solid or liquid aerosols from the inspired air.

    Filtering facepiece (dust mask) means a negative pressure particulate respirator with a filter as an integral part of the facepiece or with the entire facepiece composed of the filtering medium.

    Fit factor means a quantitative estimate of the fit of a particular respirator to a specific individual, and typically estimates the ratio of the concentration of a substance in ambient air to its concentration inside the respirator when worn.

    Fit test means the use of a protocol to qualitatively or quantitatively evaluate the fit of a respirator on an individual. (See also Qualitative fit test QLFT and Quantitative fit test QNFT.)

    Helmet means a rigid respiratory inlet covering that also provides head protection against impact and penetration.

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter means a filter that is at least 99.97% efficient in removing monodisperse particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter. The equivalent NIOSH 42 CFR 84 particulate filters are the N100, R100, and P100 filters.

    Hood means a respiratory inlet covering that completely covers the head and neck and may also cover portions of the shoulders and torso.

    Immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) means an atmosphere that poses an immediate threat to life, would cause irreversible adverse health effects, or would impair an individual's ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere.

    Interior structural firefighting means the physical activity of fire suppression, rescue or both, inside of buildings or enclosed structures which are involved in a fire situation beyond the incipient stage. (See 29 CFR 1910.155)

    Loose-fitting facepiece means a respiratory inlet covering that is designed to form a partial seal with the face.

    Maximum use concentration (MUC) [Reserved].

    Negative pressure respirator (tight fitting) means a respirator in which the air pressure inside the facepiece is negative during inhalation with respect to the ambient air pressure outside the respirator.

    Oxygen deficient atmosphere means an atmosphere with an oxygen content below 19.5% by volume.

    Physician or other licensed health care professional (PLHCP) means an individual whose legally permitted scope of practice (i.e., license, registration, or certification) allows him or her to independently provide, or be delegated the responsibility to provide, some or all of the health care services required by paragraph (e) of this section.

    Positive pressure respirator means a respirator in which the pressure inside the respiratory inlet covering exceeds the ambient air pressure outside the respirator.

    Powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) means an air-purifying respirator that uses a blower to force the ambient air through air-purifying elements to the inlet covering.

    Pressure demand respirator means a positive pressure atmosphere-supplying respirator that admits breathing air to the facepiece when the positive pressure is reduced inside the facepiece by inhalation.

    Qualitative fit test (QLFT) means a pass/fail fit test to assess the adequacy of respirator fit that relies on the individual's response to the test agent.

    Quantitative fit test (QNFT) means an assessment of the adequacy of respirator fit by numerically measuring the amount of leakage into the respirator.

    Respiratory inlet covering means that portion of a respirator that forms the protective barrier between the user's respiratory tract and an air-purifying device or breathing air source, or both. It may be a facepiece, helmet, hood, suit, or a mouthpiece respirator with nose clamp.

    Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) means an atmosphere- supplying respirator for which the breathing air source is designed to be carried by the user.

    Service life means the period of time that a respirator, filter or sorbent, or other respiratory equipment provides adequate protection to the wearer.

    Supplied-air respirator (SAR) or airline respirator means an atmosphere-supplying respirator for which the source of breathing air is not designed to be carried by the user.

    This section means this respiratory protection standard.

    Tight-fitting facepiece means a respiratory inlet covering that forms a complete seal with the face.

    User seal check means an action conducted by the respirator user to determine if the respirator is properly seated to the face.

    (c) Respiratory protection program. This paragraph requires the employer to develop and implement a written respiratory protection program with required worksite-specific procedures and elements for required respirator use. The program must be administered by a suitably trained program administrator. In addition, certain program elements may be required for voluntary use to prevent potential hazards associated with the use of the respirator. The Small Entity Compliance Guide contains criteria for the selection of a program administrator and a sample program that meets the requirements of this paragraph. Copies of the Small Entity Compliance Guide will be available on or about April 8, 1998 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Office of Publications, Room N 3101, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC, 20210 (202-219-4667).

    (c)(1) In any workplace where respirators are necessary to protect the health of the employee or whenever respirators are required by the employer, the employer shall establish and implement a written respiratory protection program with worksite-specific procedures. The program shall be updated as necessary to reflect those changes in workplace conditions that affect respirator use. The employer shall include in the program the following provisions of this section, as applicable:

    (c)(1)(i) Procedures for selecting respirators for use in the workplace;

    (c)(1)(ii) Medical evaluations of employees required to use respirators;

    (c)(1)(iii) Fit testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators;

    (c)(1)(iv) Procedures for proper use of respirators in routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations;

    (c)(1)(v) Procedures and schedules for cleaning, disinfecting, storing, inspecting, repairing, discarding, and otherwise maintaining respirators;

    (c)(1)(vi) Procedures to ensure adequate air quality, quantity, and flow of breathing air for atmosphere-supplying respirators;

    (c)(1)(vii) raining of employees in the respiratory hazards to which they are potentially exposed during routine and emergency situations;

    ..1910.134(c)(1)(viii)

    (c)(1)(viii) Training of employees in the proper use of respirators, including putting on and removing them, any limitations on their use, and their maintenance; and

    (c)(1)(ix) Procedures for regularly evaluating the effectiveness of the program.

    (c)(2) Where respirator use is not required:

    (c)(2)(i) An employer may provide respirators at the request of employees or permit employees to use their own respirators, if the employer determines that such respirator use will not in itself create a hazard. If the employer determines that any voluntary respirator use is permissible, the employer shall provide the respirator users with the information contained in Appendix D to this section ("Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard"); and

    (c)(2)(ii) In addition, the employer must establish and implement those elements of a written respiratory protection program necessary to ensure that any employee using a respirator voluntarily is medically able to use that respirator, and that the respirator is cleaned, stored, and maintained so that its use does not present a health hazard to the user. Exception: Employers are not required to include in a written respiratory protection program those employees whose only use of respirators involves the voluntary use of filtering facepieces (dust masks).

    (c)(3) The employer shall designate a program administrator who is qualified by appropriate training or experience that is commensurate with the complexity of the program to administer or oversee the respiratory protection program and conduct the required evaluations of program effectiveness.

    (c)(4) The employer shall provide respirators, training, and medical evaluations at no cost to the employee.

    (d) Selection of respirators. This paragraph requires the employer to evaluate respiratory hazard(s) in the workplace, identify relevant workplace and user factors, and base respirator selection on these factors. The paragraph also specifies appropriately protective respirators for use in IDLH atmospheres, and limits the selection and use of air-purifying respirators.

    (d)(1) General requirements.

    (d)(1)(i) The employer shall select and provide an appropriate respirator based on the respiratory hazard(s) to which the worker is exposed and workplace and user factors that affect respirator performance and reliability.

    (d)(1)(ii) The employer shall select a NIOSH-certified respirator. The respirator shall be used in compliance with the conditions of its certification.

    (d)(1)(iii) The employer shall identify and evaluate the respiratory hazard(s) in the workplace; this evaluation shall include a reasonable estimate of employee exposures to respiratory hazard(s) and an identification of the contaminant's chemical state and physical form. Where the employer cannot identify or reasonably estimate the employee exposure, the employer shall consider the atmosphere to be IDLH.

    ..1910.134(d)(1)(iv)

    (d)(1)(iv) The employer shall select respirators from a sufficient number of respirator models and sizes so that the respirator is acceptable to, and correctly fits, the user.

    (d)(2) Respirators for IDLH atmospheres.

    (d)(2)(i) The employer shall provide the following respirators for employee use in IDLH atmospheres:

    (d)(2)(i)(A) A full facepiece pressure demand SCBA certified by NIOSH for a minimum service life of thirty minutes, or

    (d)(2)(i)(B) A combination full facepiece pressure demand supplied-air respirator (SAR) with auxiliary self-contained air supply.

    (d)(2)(ii) Respirators provided only for escape from IDLH atmospheres shall be NIOSH-certified for escape from the atmosphere in which they will be used.

    (d)(2)(iii) All oxygen-deficient atmospheres shall be considered IDLH. Exception: If the employer demonstrates that, under all foreseeable conditions, the oxygen concentration can be maintained within the ranges specified in Table II of this section (i.e., for the altitudes set out in the table), then any atmosphere-supplying respirator may be used.

    (d)(3) Respirators for atmospheres that are not IDLH.

    (d)(3)(i) The employer shall provide a respirator that is adequate to protect the health of the employee and ensure compliance with all other OSHA statutory and regulatory requirements, under routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations.

    (d)(3)(i)(A) Assigned Protection Factors (APFs) [Reserved]

    (d)(3)(i)(B) Maximum Use Concentration (MUC) [Reserved]

    (d)(3)(ii) The respirator selected shall be appropriate for the chemical state and physical form of the contaminant.

    (d)(3)(iii) For protection against gases and vapors, the employer shall provide:

    (d)(3)(iii)(A) An atmosphere-supplying respirator, or

    (d)(3)(iii)(B) An air-purifying respirator, provided that:

    (d)(3)(iii)(B)(1) The respirator is equipped with an end-of-service-life indicator (ESLI) certified by NIOSH for the contaminant; or

    (d)(3)(iii)(B)(2) If there is no ESLI appropriate for conditions in the employer's workplace, the employer implements a change schedule for canisters and cartridges that is based on objective information or data that will ensure that canisters and cartridges are changed before the end of their service life. The employer shall describe in the respirator program the information and data relied upon and the basis for the canister and cartridge change schedule and the basis for reliance on the data.

    (d)(3)(iv) For protection against particulates, the employer shall provide:

    (d)(3)(iv)(A) An atmosphere-supplying respirator; or

    (d)(3)(iv)(B) An air-purifying respirator equipped with a filter certified by NIOSH under 30 CFR part 11 as a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, or an air-purifying respirator equipped with a filter certified for particulates by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84; or

    (d)(3)(iv)(C) For contaminants consisting primarily of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of at least 2 micrometers, an air- purifying respirator equipped with any filter certified for particulates by NIOSH.

    TABLE I. -- Assigned Protection
    Factors [Reserved]



    ..1910.134(e)

    (e) Medical evaluation. Using a respirator may place a physiological burden on employees that varies with the type of respirator worn, the job and workplace conditions in which the respirator is used, and the medical status of the employee. Accordingly, this paragraph specifies the minimum requirements for medical evaluation that employers must implement to determine the employee's ability to use a respirator.

    (e)(1) General. The employer shall provide a medical evaluation to determine the employee's ability to use a respirator, before the employee is fit tested or required to use the respirator in the workplace. The employer may discontinue an employee's medical evaluations when the employee is no longer required to use a respirator.

    (e)(2) Medical evaluation procedures.

    (e)(2)(i) The employer shall identify a physician or other licensed health care professional (PLHCP) to perform medical evaluations using a medical questionnaire or an initial medical examination that obtains the same information as the medical questionnaire.

    (e)(2)(ii) The medical evaluation shall obtain the information requested by the questionnaire in Sections 1 and 2, Part A of Appendix C of this section.

    (e)(3) Follow-up medical examination.

    (e)(3)(i) The employer shall ensure that a follow-up medical examination is provided for an employee who gives a positive response to any question among questions 1 through 8 in Section 2, Part A of Appendix C or whose initial medical examination demonstrates the need for a follow-up medical examination.

    (e)(3)(ii) The follow-up medical examination shall include any medical tests, consultations, or diagnostic procedures that the PLHCP deems necessary to make a final determination.

    (e)(4) Administration of the medical questionnaire and examinations.

    (e)(4)(i) The medical questionnaire and examinations shall be administered confidentially during the employee's normal working hours or at a time and place convenient to the employee. The medical questionnaire shall be administered in a manner that ensures that the employee understands its content.

    (e)(4)(ii) The employer shall provide the employee with an opportunity to discuss the questionnaire and examination results with the PLHCP.

    (e)(5) Supplemental information for the PLHCP.

    (e)(5)(i) The following information must be provided to the PLHCP before the PLHCP makes a recommendation concerning an employee's ability to use a respirator:

    (e)(5)(i)(A) The type and weight of the respirator to be used by the employee;

    (e)(5)(i)(B) The duration and frequency of respirator use (including use for rescue and escape);

    (e)(5)(i)(C) The expected physical work effort;

    (e)(5)(i)(D) Additional protective clothing and equipment to be worn; and

    (e)(5)(i)(E) Temperature and humidity extremes that may be encountered.

    (e)(5)(ii) Any supplemental information provided previously to the PLHCP regarding an employee need not be provided for a subsequent medical evaluation if the information and the PLHCP remain the same.

    (e)(5)(iii) The employer shall provide the PLHCP with a copy of the written respiratory protection program and a copy of this section. Note to Paragraph (e)(5)(iii): When the employer replaces a PLHCP, the employer must ensure that the new PLHCP obtains this information, either by providing the documents directly to the PLHCP or having the documents transferred from the former PLHCP to the new PLHCP. However, OSHA does not expect employers to have employees medically reevaluated solely because a new PLHCP has been selected.

    (e)(6) Medical determination. In determining the employee's ability to use a respirator, the employer shall:

    (e)(6)(i) Obtain a written recommendation regarding the employee's ability to use the respirator from the PLHCP. The recommendation shall provide only the following information:

    (e)(6)(i)(A) Any limitations on respirator use related to the medical condition of the employee, or relating to the workplace conditions in which the respirator will be used, including whether or not the employee is medically able to use the respirator;

    (e)(6)(i)(B) The need, if any, for follow-up medical evaluations; and

    (e)(6)(i)(C) A statement that the PLHCP has provided the employee with a copy of the PLHCP's written recommendation.

    (e)(6)(ii) If the respirator is a negative pressure respirator and the PLHCP finds a medical condition that may place the employee's health at increased risk if the respirator is used, the employer shall provide a PAPR if the PLHCP's medical evaluation finds that the employee can use such a respirator; if a subsequent medical evaluation finds that the employee is medically able to use a negative pressure respirator, then the employer is no longer required to provide a PAPR.

    (e)(7) Additional medical evaluations. At a minimum, the employer shall provide additional medical evaluations that comply with the requirements of this section if:

    (e)(7)(i) An employee reports medical signs or symptoms that are related to ability to use a respirator;

    (e)(7)(ii) A PLHCP, supervisor, or the respirator program administrator informs the employer that an employee needs to be reevaluated;

    (e)(7)(iii) Information from the respiratory protection program, including observations made during fit testing and program evaluation, indicates a need for employee reevaluation; or

    (e)(7)(iv) A change occurs in workplace conditions (e.g., physical work effort, protective clothing, temperature) that may result in a substantial increase in the physiological burden placed on an employee.

    (f) Fit testing. This paragraph requires that, before an employee may be required to use any respirator with a negative or positive pressure tight-fitting facepiece, the employee must be fit tested with the same make, model, style, and size of respirator that will be used. This paragraph specifies the kinds of fit tests allowed, the procedures for conducting them, and how the results of the fit tests must be used.

    (f)(1) The employer shall ensure that employees using a tight-fitting facepiece respirator pass an appropriate qualitative fit test (QLFT) or quantitative fit test (QNFT) as stated in this paragraph.

    (f)(2) The employer shall ensure that an employee using a tight- fitting facepiece respirator is fit tested prior to initial use of the respirator, whenever a different respirator facepiece (size, style, model or make) is used, and at least annually thereafter.

    (f)(3) The employer shall conduct an additional fit test whenever the employee reports, or the employer, PLHCP, supervisor, or program administrator makes visual observations of, changes in the employee's physical condition that could affect respirator fit. Such conditions include, but are not limited to, facial scarring, dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or an obvious change in body weight.

    (f)(4) If after passing a QLFT or QNFT, the employee subsequently notifies the employer, program administrator, supervisor, or PLHCP that the fit of the respirator is unacceptable, the employee shall be given a reasonable opportunity to select a different respirator facepiece and to be retested.

    ..1910.134(f)(5)

    (f)(5) The fit test shall be administered using an OSHA-accepted QLFT or QNFT protocol. The OSHA-accepted QLFT and QNFT protocols and procedures are contained in Appendix A of this section.

    (f)(6) QLFT may only be used to fit test negative pressure air- purifying respirators that must achieve a fit factor of 100 or less.

    (f)(7) If the fit factor, as determined through an OSHA-accepted QNFT protocol, is equal to or greater than 100 for tight-fitting half facepieces, or equal to or greater than 500 for tight-fitting full facepieces, the QNFT has been passed with that respirator.

    (f)(8) Fit testing of tight-fitting atmosphere-supplying respirators and tight-fitting powered air-purifying respirators shall be accomplished by performing quantitative or qualitative fit testing in the negative pressure mode, regardless of the mode of operation (negative or positive pressure) that is used for respiratory protection.

    (f)(1)(8)(i) Qualitative fit testing of these respirators shall be accomplished by temporarily converting the respirator user's actual facepiece into a negative pressure respirator with appropriate filters, or by using an identical negative pressure air-purifying respirator facepiece with the same sealing surfaces as a surrogate for the atmosphere-supplying or powered air-purifying respirator facepiece.

    (f)(1)(8)(ii) Quantitative fit testing of these respirators shall be accomplished by modifying the facepiece to allow sampling inside the facepiece in the breathing zone of the user, midway between the nose and mouth. This requirement shall be accomplished by installing a permanent sampling probe onto a surrogate facepiece, or by using a sampling adapter designed to temporarily provide a means of sampling air from inside the facepiece.

    (f)(1)(8)(iii) Any modifications to the respirator facepiece for fit testing shall be completely removed, and the facepiece restored to NIOSH- approved configuration, before that facepiece can be used in the workplace.

    (g) Use of respirators. This paragraph requires employers to establish and implement procedures for the proper use of respirators. These requirements include prohibiting conditions that may result in facepiece seal leakage, preventing employees from removing respirators in hazardous environments, taking actions to ensure continued effective respirator operation throughout the work shift, and establishing procedures for the use of respirators in IDLH atmospheres or in interior structural firefighting situations.

    (g)(1) Facepiece seal protection.

    (g)(1)(i) The employer shall not permit respirators with tight-fitting facepieces to be worn by employees who have:

    (g)(1)(i)(A) Facial hair that comes between the sealing surface of the facepiece and the face or that interferes with valve function; or

    (g)(1)(i)(B) Any condition that interferes with the face-to-facepiece seal or valve function.

    (g)(1)(ii) If an employee wears corrective glasses or goggles or other personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that such equipment is worn in a manner that does not interfere with the seal of the facepiece to the face of the user.

    Couldnt find the specific passage requiring each employee to have his/her own mask. But I hardly know of any departments anymore that DONT issue personal masks.

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    Default DAYUM!!!!!!

    SORRY GUYS!!!!!! I dont know what happened!!!! I only meant to post sections (G) (1) through (G) (1) (ii), the last 4 sections!!!! DOH!


    Oh well....at least if you need some help to go to sleep you know where to look now!

    SOWWY! (hangs head in shame)

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    There is NO requirement in the standard that states an employer must provide each employee with his/her own mask.

    The standard does require that each employer have a mask of the proper (read: fit-tested) sized mask available for each employee before he/she is to work in a contaminated atmosphere.

    Many departments (including mine) went to issuing individual facepieces to ease compliance with this requirement.

    For example, suppose FF Jones and FF Smith both need medium masks; FF McGillicuddy and FF Crabtree both need large masks; and FF Clampett and FF Fife both need smalls. So Poedunk FPD places one mask of each size in the cab for three packs. This works great, and in fact, is in full compliance with the standard, so long as the three FF getting on the rig each need a different size mask. The problem starts when your crew consists of FF Clampett, FF Fife, and FF Crabtree. One of the two guys needing smalls is SOL. He can't go into the IDLH atmosphere, because he is not offered the proper, tested size mask. By the time you buy enough masks to ensure that each employee will have the proper size, you are better off issuing them and making each member responsible for their own mask.

    A side benefit here, is that now I know when I put that mask on, that it is NOT the one FF Fife was wearing when he puked in it last fire....

    MSA Spectle kit

    Looking for the Scott equivalent. I'll post it if I find it....
    Last edited by jaybird210; 09-11-2003 at 01:08 PM.
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    We have 2 members that do not fit into the medium size mask that all of our SCBA have. Myself and one other gentleman. I needed a small, he needed a large. The FD bought 2 of each for us. We each have one with out gear and the other is on the truck as a backup. We have 1 mask with each pack and 4 or 5 extra on each of our 2 engines. That leaves us about 20 masks short of every person, but 8 to 10 over for the number of packs we have. The one with large has an eyeglass holder in it.

    They are cleaned after every use and disinfected if someone pukes in it. Been there, saw that, not pretty.

    I'm not against everyone having their own mask, it's just not that common a thing in my parts.

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    More about contacts:
    See IFSTA Essentials 4th Ed. p .93

    OSHA says that soft contacts have no direct or immediate relationship
    to employee safety or health.

    I love my contacts, I dont have any problems with them. I use the soft Acuvue2.

    About Masks:

    We dont issue personal masks. Reasoning...we can't afford to equip all personnel. Everyone of our guys fit tested for Medium (Standard,Large whatever it is considered). We have one guy who has the glasses insert and he has his own mask for the simple fact that it will take him 30 seconds longer to pop the glasses in. Since the glasses are popped in the mask all the time, he has no delay.
    Last edited by cmjones; 09-11-2003 at 03:55 PM.

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    I use the military glasses kit without any problem. Arkansas is not an OSHA state... so I guess I should be good.

    The question I have about getting a kit for the mask is this... My department runs with both MSA *and* Survivair packs. Do to a variety of circumstances, I'm not guaranteed to use one or the other all of the time. Wouldn't I have to have two seperate mask inserts?

    Also, fit testing? What's that. In both departments I've been a member of... They've had one size fits all. It's been promised that when we finally get rid of all of our MSA, we'll have a personal mask. However... we're a long way from that day.

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    Originally posted by cozmosis
    ...fit testing? What's that. In both departments I've been a member of... They've had one size fits all.
    I am assuming your not being sarcastic, so I'll give you the quick and dirty on Fit Testing. Fit Testing is an NFPA and OSHA/WCB requirement that should basically confirm that your mask actually works as intended on your particular face.

    You should first have your masks tested professionally (on a fancy testing unit that I can't remember the name of) to ensure they don't have any leaks. It looks like a manniquin head with pumps built into it.

    Once you are satified the mask is good, the fit test is generally done by inserting a charcoal filter into the regulator hole on your mask (using a special adapter), and then while you wear the mask and breath normally, the tester passes an odourant capsule or smoke stick around the mask to see if you can smell it. If you can, you don't have a good seal. Some people cannot wear certain types of masks just because of the shape of their face, and fit testing is the only way to be sure a particular mask will work for you. My two cents is to try moving around in the mask during your test as well. Some people keep a seal while standing still, but as soon as they turn their head, they lose it.

    It is important that you don't try to fit test with tank air flowing, or your results will be corrupted by the positive pressure blowing the odourant out. If you use the charcoal filter, you are creating a suction inside your mask, and will draw the odourant in through any leaks.

    We use Drager, and we have both the old NOVA masks, and some new PANORAMA masks. Some people get a better fit on the old ones, and some on the new ones. Newer masks generally fit differently than similar worked in units as well. You just have to try and see.

    I'm sure one of the other guys around here can fill in anything I missed.
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

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    I have used the Scott vision inserts for a number of years with no problem. I keep them in the radio pocket of my coat where they fit quite nicely.It takes me no longer than 5 sec to fit them into the face-piece. Remember to have a hard case to put your regular glasses in though when you take them off,because they can get lost or take a beating otherwise if you shove them in a pocket.

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    The Federal OSHA Standard is 26 CFR 1910.134

    It is very specific, as FWDbuff managed to quote a small chunk, and lays out the rules for respiratory protection. It describes how fit testing will take place.

    What mcaldwell has described is qualitative fit testing. It is done with the mask only (no air). You have to generate negative presure inside the mask to ensure there are no leaks. There is a series of OSHA specified excersizes that you must do during the test.

    The other, more reliable (and hence, more expensive) method is called a quanitative fit test, where an adaptor is inserted onto the mask (in place of the regulator) and this is connected to a machine that measures particles in the mask. The excersizes are the same (they are, breathing, talking, moving your head around, talking, and bending over... we are all good at that last one. Lotsa practice).

    Arkansas is not an OSHA state... so I guess I should be good.
    No, you are not good. If Arkansas is not an OSHA state, then that means that your state MUST have an OSHA-equivalent agency that enforces OSHA rules. Illinois is not an OSHA state either, but we have the IL Department of Labor. They adopt OSHA rules to the letter, or make them more stringent. Why? They HAVE to, by federal law.

    Your department MUST do fit testing.
    Your department MUST provide each firefighter who is SCBA qualified a mask that fit thems according to a fit test.
    Your department MUST medically evaluate each member to make sure they are physically able to wear a pack.
    Your department MUST have a respiratory protection program in place.
    This is the federal law. There is no getting around it.
    There are thousands of departments that do not comply. Until two years ago, mine was one of them. Then IDOL came a-calling. Guess what? We now have a respiratory protection program in place. Everyone gets fit tested. Everyone has access to a mask that fits them. It cost us some money, but nothing next to the fines they could've levied.

    Two more thoughts on this:
    1) It really only cost us about $300 to comply with the law. That was the cost for a qualitative fit test kit (the one that uses the stinky stuff. If you can smell this, try another mask). Then we had to write a bunch of rules. And keep a bunch of paperwork. Compliance is not that tough.
    2) I posted earlier that everyone on my department has their own mask. While this is certainly the ideal, we only had twenty-five people SCBA qualified, and we already had 10 masks. So we bought 15 (at $280 /each). FIRE Act grant. If your department had 60 members, and you only had 15 masks, that's a helluva lot more money. You don't have to do this. If you can get enough masks of the proper size, you are good to go. There is no such thing as a "one-size-fits-all" SCBA mask. {edit: What bones posted his department does is a perfectly acceptable method. as long as you have been fit tested and your department makes a mask of that size available to you for your use....}

    P.S. The IDOL inspector pointed out to me that failure to comply could result in fines (she was also quick to point out that they don't fine FDs unless it is a grossly negligent, intentional violation). Those fines, in IL, were $1,000 per day, per EMPLOYEE, since the violation began! Ooof. There goes my raise.
    Last edited by jaybird210; 09-12-2003 at 09:04 AM.
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