1. #1
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    Default Future Fire Fighter Needs Advice!

    I'm very interested in becoming a fire fighter, and have been working out for nearly 5 months to get in shape. I'm 6'2 175 right now. Our local ordinance has certain physical test's you take, and acrue points during the proccess. They are maximum sit ups/push ups/ pull ups in one minute. And running a mile and half in 12 minutes. The testing period start I believe in January. I feel I'm progressing well, and have gotten a lot stronger in the last few months. Our local Fire Chief has been my next door neighbor for 20 years so I have good connections, but I dont want to seem like a pest asking him questions all the time. I was just wondering if you guys can give me some tips/advice on weight training (programs etc.) and just getting myself prepared so I can do as well as possible. Also, if you guys know any reading material that would help me on the written test. Please post here, or email me

    mattanderson41@hotmail.com

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    CPAT test sites, if your state or region uses that means of testing, offer physical conditioning programs to help prepare candidates for the test. There is literature out there available for you, probably online and certainly in writing at your state's fire standards facility. Good luck!
    ~Kevin
    Firefighter/Paramedic
    --^v--^v--^v--^v--
    Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong
    Dennis Miller

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    Default Read on...

    anderson41- Being fit is just part of the testing
    process. Get an edge on your interview skills,
    check out www.eatstress.com

    -Bou

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    1. Exercise regularly (You're doing that)
    2. Volunteer somewhere (to make sure you know what you're getting into as well as get some experience and training)
    3. Get training--Follow your state's guidelines for certification and start training now--even if you'll be going to an academy, the extra training and experience will help.
    4. Get certified-Become an EMT. The higher your certification levels, the easier it becomes to get a job.
    5. Buy that Eatstress book from capt bob. No kidding, I took an oral exam and EVERY SINGLE QUESTION they asked came out of that book.
    6. Don't give up--sometimes it can take YEARS to get the job. You will fill out so many apps your fingers will get sore. Most of the time the process itself will take six months or more for the larger departments.
    7. Apply everywhere, even to the places that might not be your first choice--every department has thier own style and way of doing things. You never know which one you'd actually "fit with" until you see how they do things (include hire people).
    8. Don't do anything stupid--like drinking and driving, slapping around your wife/girlfriend, smoking drugs etc.

    Just some small hints and tips--
    "When you are safe at home, you wish you were having an adventure-when you're having an adventure, you wish you were safe at home"

    --Thornton Wilder

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    Default Articles

    Just because the chief lives next door doesn't mean you will have the job. You want to put yourself in a position where they can't go around you or embarrass you or the chief.

    You can testing sectrets in the career article section of this firehouse.com web site: http://cms.firehouse.com/content/co...r/bio.jsp?id=18

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob"

    www.eatstress.com

  6. #6
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    BTW,

    thanks Capt Bob--that course helped me get a #2 spot on the list I used it for--badge will be coming shortly!
    "When you are safe at home, you wish you were having an adventure-when you're having an adventure, you wish you were safe at home"

    --Thornton Wilder

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    Default Alright!

    jatkins7011

    Bravo! Keep us informed.

    Captain Bob

    www.eatstress.com

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    Default Re: Future Fire Fighter Needs Advice!

    Originally posted by anderson41
    Our local Fire Chief has been my next door neighbor for 20 years so I have good connections, but I dont want to seem like a pest asking him questions all the time. [/email]
    Well, Since he is your neighbor, you dont have to avoid him like the plague, but be up front and honest, with him..

    let him know you are interested, that you are hoping to get a job with his department and that you were wondering if he was able to give you any tips and suggestions, and if he would be willing to answer occasional questions when he is at home (make sure it is occasional and not 20 or 30 questions every day of the week). Also as someone else already suggested, see if they have a volunteer program, or allow you to ride along to see if it is really of interest to you.

    Gerard

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    I've taken a lot of physical agility tests, and one thing I've seen is that endurance plays a much bigger role than strength. I've seen guys who can bench press 270 who can't pass a test because they don't have the cardiovascular fitness needed. Sure, lifting weights is good, but running is better. Do both, but focus on the running (at the end of any test I've taken, my legs and lungs hurt more than my arms).

    And take every test you can- even for the dept. you don't want to work for. Why? Two reasons: One- it's good practice; and two- you might get a job offer out of it (it's often easier to go from one full time dept. to another than to go from a volly dept. to a full time one).

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