1. #1
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    Unhappy What is it going to take ..........

    Three dead in Saanich car crash


    Times Colonist


    Tuesday, November 04, 2003

    Three young friends from Southern Vancouver Island are dead and another is critically injured, after the 17-year-old driver lost control of a car on the TransCanada Highway near Admirals Road late Monday night.

    Dead are Jesse Briscoe, who was driving, 17-year-old Chantel Williams, and 20-year-old Steve McMillan. McMillan was also known as Steve Harris.

    The survivor is 20-year-old Matthew Panter.

    The three young men and the young woman had been hanging out at Panter's apartment shortly before the accident. The four friends crammed into a borrowed two-seat Honda CRX and drove into Victoria.

    The group travelled south on the TransCanada Highway. According to police, they were likely going double or triple the posted speed limit of 80 km/h.

    The crash happened just after 9:30 p.m.

    The driver lost control, and the car crossed the highway, struck the concrete divider and flipped over several times before slamming into the embankment on the other side of the road.

    The impact threw two of the four people from the car. Panter was ejected so far from the car that police needed to use dogs to find him.

    Police have been told it was Panter who called a friend from his cell phone immediately after the accident. He is now in hospital with a shunt in his brain.

    Police say one of the three passengers may have been crammed in the CRX's hatchback area. They're also looking into the possibility Williams may have been sitting on the driver's lap.

    A roadside memorial is growing as a stream of people who knew the victims come to pay their respects at the scene of the crash.

    Williams' family is mourning two deaths - that of Williams herself and also her unborn child. Williams was 12 weeks pregnant with her boyfriend Panter's child.

    Copyright 2003 CH TV, Times Colonist (Victoria)


    This sickens me, it's one of many accidents in the past little while that have killed young people in our area. Young people full of potential, with their wholes lives ahead of them........ snuffed out in the blink of an eye because of a moment of blinding stupidity. What is it going to take for young people to realize that they are NOT invincible, that the rules of the road are in place for safety. At 17 they don't have the road sense or experience to be speeding by 5 MPH, let alone going triple the posted limits. I am so angered by this senseless tragedy, 3 more young people gone, an unborn child who never had a chance and one life hanging in the balance. I am angry that my fellow EMS had to deal with the aftermath of this carnage, although it's their job, I'm sure this will haunt them. I pray for the families of all involved, and I pray that someday, somehow the message will get through to these kids.

    Speed is not cool, it's not fun ........ IT KILLS!!!!!


    **** side note: there are pictures with this article, maybe 27 will be nice and post them later.
    To the world you might be one person, but to one person you just might be the world.

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    One of the hazards of being a teenager/young adult is most have no notion of their own mortality, I was probably the same way. My years in the Fire Service have obviously given me a different perspective than most people when it comes to mortality. "Yes, this tragedy could actually happen to YOU"!

    As far as overall driving, it's gotten just crazy over the years! My 60 mile round trip to and from work provide daily examples of just unbelievable stupidity...some of these people are absolutely nuts. My 16 yr old is getting his license, scares the crap out of me. I've taken him on some MVA calls to try and give him the 'up close and personal' that the gory Driver Education movies just can't bring home to most kids. Not sure if it will make a difference, time will have to tell.

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    What is it going to take for young people to realize that they are NOT invincible,
    Showing them the graphic pictures and haveing the survivros comeing and talking to us about how there friends are gone worked at our school.

    Sorry for your loss up there Jenn,its a true tragedy.

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    Default OK.. HERE GOES

    Pfire asked if I could make this happen. I hope it works.
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    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

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    Random thought....why do car manufacturers build cars that travel more than 80mph? If the highest speed limit is 80, why build a car that goes faster?

    A tragic loss...
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Originally posted by Bones42
    Random thought....why do car manufacturers build cars that travel more than 80mph? If the highest speed limit is 80, why build a car that goes faster?

    A tragic loss...



    Would be too easy...kinda like the black box recorders that are never damaged in plane crashes, why not build the whole plane out of the same stuff.
    No longer an explorer, but I didn't wanna lose my posts.

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    Originally posted by Bones42
    Random thought....why do car manufacturers build cars that travel more than 80mph? If the highest speed limit is 80, why build a car that goes faster?
    Free country and transmissions work off torque not speed.


    why not build the whole plane out of the same stuff.
    The aircraft would be too heavy.

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    Originally posted by stm4710




    The aircraft would be too heavy.


    T'was a joke, my friend.
    No longer an explorer, but I didn't wanna lose my posts.

    IACOJ 2003

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    Default FURTHER FOLLOW UP

    Driver had no licence, friends say

    Kim Westad Times Colonist Thursday, November 06, 2003

    The car swerved out of control about while travelling southbound on the Trans-Canada Highway into Victoria from Langford.

    The teenage driver behind the wheel of a sports car that crashed, killing himself and two others, did not have a valid driver's licence, say his friends -- information confirmed by another source Wednesday.

    However, 17-year-old Jesse Briscoe did have a learner's licence, the partner of Briscoe's mother said.

    Briscoe had been driving for about a year, said Jim Nowell, who had known Briscoe for almost a decade and who hired him in the past of couple years to work on his construction crew.

    The teen's driving was largely self-taught, Nowell said, although he and Briscoe's mother sometimes took the teen out. He knew Briscoe to be a "very safe" driver, and was shocked to hear that he had been speeding along the Trans-Canada Highway Monday night at rates police estimated as high as 160 kilometres an hour.

    Four people were crammed inside a bright yellow two-seat Honda CRX. The car, borrowed from a friend, swerved out of control about 9:30 p.m. while travelling southbound on the Trans-Canada Highway into Victoria from Langford.

    As it approached the Admirals Road/McKenzie Avenue exit in Saanich, the car veered onto the grass median and became airborne.

    It rolled end-over-end down the opposite side of the highway for about 100 metres before coming to rest in a ditch. It was just luck that there were no vehicles in the two northbound lanes as the car bounced along the highway.

    Dead are Chantel Williams, 17, who was four months pregnant; Allen Stephen (Steve) Harris, 20; and Briscoe. Matthew Panter, 20, remained in critical condition in Victoria General Hospital Wednesday. He suffered severe head injuries after being thrown so far from the car that a police dog had to be used to find him.

    Williams also was thrown from the car. Briscoe was still in the driver's seat, and Harris was jammed in the back of the car.

    It is believed that Williams was sitting on Panter's lap in the passenger seat. He was her boyfriend.

    Neither the Motor Vehicle Branch nor Saanich police would confirm whether Briscoe had a driver's licence, citing privacy regulations.

    "Because the driver has been identified, all other personal information, including his driver's licence status and history, are protected under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act," said Saanich Police Const. Chris Horsley.

    "In short, the deceased have the same rights to privacy as the people still living."

    However, several of Briscoe's friends and another source said the teen did not have a valid driver's licence.

    His family is now planning a funeral for the teen known for his happy, free-spirited nature.

    "Kids are not invincible," said Nowell. He thinks driving should be taught in schools as part of the curriculum.

    Several teens said the same thing after the accident, the latest in a string of high speed crashes that have taken the lives of young people on Vancouver Island.

    "We've lost so many friends this year," said Tiffany Johnson, who also advocates for driving to become part of what is taught in school.

    She and about a dozen other teens gathered Wednesday, all friends with at least one of the three killed Monday. They said it's up to them to make responsible choices as well.

    "If you're a passenger, you have to choose the most responsible driver, a driver who will take care of the people inside," Johnson said. "People don't learn until it happens to them, until they lose someone they love."

    Johnson said she wants to get her driver's licence, but she's scared.

    "What if I kill my friends? I have a lot of male friends, and they're scared too."

    RCMP Sgt. Ted Smith has seen far too many crashes. He doesn't call them accidents.

    "If a vehicle is sitting stationary and an asteroid hits it, that's maybe an accident. Crashes or collisions are not accidents," said the commander of Vancouver Island District Traffic Services, which investigates crashes in areas policed by the RCMP. The Monday crash is being investigated by Saanich police.

    "With proper judgment, all crashes can be prevented. Of all the crashes we deal with, and there are hundreds on the Island, very few are in fact accidents."

    Speed far too often plays a role, he said, particularly in collisions involving young drivers.

    "These kids ended up paying the penalty for someone's misjudgments."

    Williams' funeral is set for next Monday.

    Meanwhile, a roadside memorial continues, with flowers and teddy bears piling up beside a makeshift wooden cross. Some people have spray-painted hearts and the word "love" on the pavement, and a few have left bottles of alcohol at the site.

    While toxicology samples were taken, there is no indication yet that alcohol was involved in the crash.

    Copyright 2003 Times Colonist (Victoria)


    Our student driver permit requirements have been under constant review/bash beating for some while now. The basics of it are that a new student driver had several restrictions which include ZERO alcohol tolerance, regardless of age, limited passenger carriage, no driving after dark. Of particular note is that it now takes 24 months to graduate from a learners permit to a "New Driver" and into a regular full and unrestricted licence. This event is just another reason why the stipulations are so great. I am not explaining this very well, but any who wish may visit the ICBC website at:
    www.icbc.bc.ca
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    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

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    Crash ends young life

    By STEVE LANDWEHR

    Staff writer


    IPSWICH - When high school Principal Barry Cahill bought a Breathalyzer for use at school functions two years ago, he told students he hoped it would prevent a tragedy.

    "I told them it was so we wouldn't have kids putting flowers at accident scenes," he said.

    Yesterday, that's precisely what kids were doing.

    Exactly one mile from the school, next to a telephone pole that had just been replaced, friends created a makeshift shrine of bouquets, votive candles and a balloon, in memory of Lisa Sparaco, the 17-year-old Ipswich High School senior killed in a crash on Linebrook Road late Wednesday night.

    "R.I.P. Lisa, we love you," read the card on one bouquet; another, "I love you so much. You'll be in my prayers."

    The brightly colored balloon, slowly spinning and twisting in a light breeze, carried the words, "We love you Lisa!"

    Sketchy details of Sparaco's shortened life were emerging at Ipswich High yesterday.

    Her family lived in town until Lisa finished eighth grade, then moved to Ocean Gate, N.J. Lisa's older sister, Laura, 20, returned to town some time ago, and graduated from the high school last year. Lisa came to live with Laura this summer, and enrolled in the high school in September.

    At the Brownville Avenue home given as Laura Sparaco's address in the town resident listings, a young woman with two children in tow said Laura had been living there, but moved recently.

    Middle and high school police resource officer Peter Nikas said he hadn't had much contact with Lisa, but she seemed to be fitting in well.

    "Talking to kids who knew her," Nikas said, "she seemed to be a really nice kid."

    Lisa and Laura came from a broken home, Nikas said, and Laura was trying to raise her younger sister.

    "She was hoping to get her some stability in her life," he said.

    Middle school Principal Cheryl Forster, visibly distraught, recalled Lisa as "a very sweet child."

    "She was gentle," Forster said, "with incredibly beautiful blue eyes - everyone who met her remarked about her eyes."

    Forster said the schools' night custodian, Charlie Love, was one of the first people to arrive at the accident scene after leaving the school at midnight.

    "He called in this morning and said he was too upset to come in today," Forster said. "He was crying when he called."

    Cahill said Lisa was excited about being back in the school, and was very enthusiastic. She was being tutored in preparation for the MCAS exam, and Cahill said she was confident she could pass it.

    She was in a chorus program at the school, Cahill said. "Apparently, she had a beautiful voice."

    Cahill addressed all the students before classes began yesterday, and school counselors are prepared to help classmates deal with grief.

    "We're a small community, 600 students," Cahill said, "so she was very important to us."

    Town Recreation Department Director Betty Dorman said Lisa and her older sister had been involved in Teen Center programs over the years, although she didn't know either of them well.

    Nonetheless, she echoed Cahill's sentiments, and said the accident hit home.

    "We're a small community, and fortunately we don't have a lot these," she said, "so when they come, they affect everyone."

    The driver of the car Lisa was riding in, Michelle Sullivan of Beverly, was charged with drunken driving. The last time Dorman could remember a similar teen tragedy was 14 years ago, when one of her daughter's classmates died in an accident.

    "It seems like we have one about every 10 years," she said. "Let's hope this is a lesson to all the kids, that you can't drink and drive."

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    Accused in fatal accident was already facing DWI charge

    By JULIE MANGANIS

    Staff writer


    IPSWICH -- Michelle Sullivan was running out the days on a 15-day temporary driver's license, issued after she was arrested and charged with drunken driving late last month.

    Just last week, an Ipswich District Court judge warned the 19-year-old to stay out of trouble while the case was pending or face going to jail for up to 60 days.

    But Wednesday night, trouble found Sullivan again. Now she is charged with causing the death of a 17-year-old Ipswich girl while driving drunk.

    Lisa Sparaco had recently been grounded for missing a midnight curfew set by her older sister and guardian and, according to friends, didn't want to be grounded again.

    "They were trying to bring her home on time," said Amber Hammett, 23, a friend of Sparaco's, speculated yesterday outside of Ipswich District Court, where friends of both Sullivan and Sparaco had gathered. "That's why maybe she was speeding,"

    Police say Sullivan, driving drunk, lost control of her 1998 Honda Accord on Linebrook Road shortly before midnight, hitting a utility pole. Sparaco, an Ipswich High School senior, was killed by the impact.

    Sullivan, of 1 Cobblers Court, Beverly, was seriously injured and taken to Beverly Hospital. A third woman in the car, Nicole Pechilis, 18, of Ipswich, walked away from the crash and refused medical attention. Police have also issued an arrest warrant for an unnamed 27-year-old Ipswich man they suspect bought beer for the teens.

    Sullivan was expected to be brought to Ipswich District Court yesterday to face charges of vehicular homicide while driving drunk and recklessly. However, her injuries, which included a collapsed lung and broken ribs, have kept her in the hospital. Her arraignment has been postponed until next Thursday,

    Just a week and a half earlier, on Oct. 28, Sullivan was in the same court, facing drunken driving charges after being stopped on Bay Road in Hamilton

    Sullivan, in the same Honda Accord, was allegedly driving 51 mph in a 40 mph zone before her Oct. 24 arrest.

    Sullivan, who according to the Registry of Motor Vehicles was driving on a 15-day temporary license that was due to expire Sunday, was again speeding Wednesday night when she crashed, Ipswich police said. Although all accused drunken drivers face license suspensions while their cases are pending - the length depending on whether they take or refuse a Breathalyzer or blood alcohol test - nearly all are given a temporary license first.

    She now faces the possibility of being held without bail, having been warned by an Ipswich District Court judge not to commit any new crimes while she was out on personal recognizance in the drunken driving case. And the new charge carries a mandatory minimum jail term of one year and a potential for up to 15 years in prison.

    Sullivan's driving record includes a speeding ticket in New Hampshire in March 2002, and an unspecified moving violation in Ipswich last December.

    "She's horribly devastated," said defense lawyer Ernest Stone, who visited his client at Beverly Hospital yesterday morning.

    "At this point we don't know enough yet to make any judgment about what happened last night, other than that it was a horrible tragedy," said Stone. "My concern for her right now is her physical health, and for the family of the girl who was killed. They're in our prayers."

    Friends of both girls shared the lawyer's assessment.

    "Lisa is just a straight-edge kid, probably the sweetest girl you've ever seen," said friend Nicole Rennick, 22, of Ipswich, who said she did not believe Sparaco ever drank or used drugs.

    And "Michelle is ... the best friend you could have," Rennick said, describing how Sullivan was supportive during a recent personal crisis.

    Sparaco had been living with her 20-year-old sister Laura, and attending Ipswich High School, where friends said they thought she was a good student.

    Sparaco's mother lives in Gloucester; her father in New Jersey, friends said. "She was trying to make the best of it," said Rennick, who said she thinks her younger friend "really wanted to make something of herself."

    Sullivan, meanwhile, had made something of her life, attending college for a year, then becoming certified as a child-care worker, said her friends. Sullivan worked for a day care center in Hamilton.

    They expressed shock that Sullivan was drinking and driving, saying she would often act as the designated driver for the other girls. Rennick also said she spoke with Sullivan after the accident, and "she didn't seem like she was drunk."

    "All she kept saying is, 'Why couldn't it have been me?'" said Hammett.

    "Like I said to all my friends, Michelle might as well have been killed," Rennick said, "because she's gonna be dead inside."

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    Like I said to all my friends, Michelle might as well have been killed," Rennick said, "because she's gonna be dead inside."
    As she should I have ZERO sympathy for drunk drivers. I hope they throw the book at this girl, obviously she is NOT learning any lessons from past experience, and now she's cost a young woman her life. At the same time, people need to wake up and take accountability for their own safety, DON'T get into a vehicle with a driver that has been drinking or that you suspect has been drinking. Crap like this is so senseless and frustrating gggggrrrrrrrrrr
    To the world you might be one person, but to one person you just might be the world.

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    Pfire

    At one fatal I attended years back, the drunk driver (just killed two in the other car) walked up to a medic claiming to have broken his finger and could they help.

    The medic looks at the finger sticking out at 90 degrees from the drunks hand, says "let me see", and proceeds to wriggle the finger around... a lot.

    While the drunk is howling, the medic turned to us and said... "Yup, thats broken."
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

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    Unhappy

    its sickening to see.. espically at my age(16) to think that people... friends.. i know/have could easily be in that situation... i dont understand what is going through there minds when... junk... like that is going on...
    I havent failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work.

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    Originally posted by FlyingKiwi
    Pfire

    At one fatal I attended years back, the drunk driver (just killed two in the other car) walked up to a medic claiming to have broken his finger and could they help.

    The medic looks at the finger sticking out at 90 degrees from the drunks hand, says "let me see", and proceeds to wriggle the finger around... a lot.

    While the drunk is howling, the medic turned to us and said... "Yup, thats broken."


    Hehehehehehe GO and shake that medics hand for me Ian. Thanks for the chuckle, I needed it
    To the world you might be one person, but to one person you just might be the world.

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    For years there has been a pretty aggressive campaign to spread the word about how dangerous drinking and driving is.
    Yet, people still choose to drink and drive

    For even longer there has been a speed limit on highways and roads. It is there for a reason.
    Yet, people still choose to speed.

    Seatbelts have been mandatory for years.
    Yet, people still choose not to wear them.

    I've been to DWI, or DUI, accidents. Almost all of us have. It is tragic that it has to happen when it could have been prevented. Yet, it still does.

    You can put a poster up on every wall; you can put a speed limit sign every 20 feet; you can legislate all the laws you can think of; but it all comes down to an individual making their individual choice.

    Everyone knows what might happen if they make the wrong choices,
    Yet, people still make them.

    "No one ever called the Fire Department for doing something smart..."

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    Man charged with buying beer for teens before crash

    By JULIE MANGANIS

    Staff writer


    NEWBURYPORT -- An Ipswich man with a long and violent criminal record has been charged with buying beer for three teenage girls just 2 1/2 hours before a fatal crash that killed one girl and left another facing vehicular homicide charges.

    David Helm, 27, of 80 Central St., pleaded not guilty to one count of providing alcohol to a minor at his arraignment yesterday in Newburyport District Court.

    Police and prosecutors say it was Helm who agreed to get four, 40-ounce bottles of King Cobra malt liquor for Michelle Sullivan, 19, of 1 Cobblers Court, Beverly, who has been charged with vehicular homicide while driving drunk and recklessly.

    Sullivan, questioned by police, admitted that she had been drinking, but initially told them only that she gave a guy on Central Street $10 to go buy beer for her and her friends, including 17-year-old Lisa Sparaco, who died when Sullivan's car struck a utility pole on Linebrook Road, prosecutor Maura Bailey said.

    When pressed, however, she identified the buyer as Helm. She told police that Helm went into Marcorelle Liquors with the $10 she gave him, and returned with the four bottles of King Cobra and $3 change. She passed the bottles to her companions, Sparaco, Nicole Pechilis, 18, another passenger in the car when it crashed, and another person, David Lightbody.

    With that information, Ipswich police were able to assemble a photo array, which they showed to a clerk at the liquor store.

    That clerk, Kimberly Lewis, recognized Helm, and then was able to produce a copy of the receipt for four King Cobras at $1.70 each plus deposit, purchased at 8:53 p.m.

    Helm, through his attorney, admits buying four King Cobra beers at Marcorelle Liquors that night, but insists that it was for himself, his brother and his brother's girlfriend, and that he did not buy it for the teens.

    Defense lawyer John Seabrook said Helm believes the girls may have identified him as the buyer in order to protect the real buyer.

    Bailey, the prosecutor, said she and police "are unable to say right now where the beer was consumed."

    But at 11:34 p.m., Ipswich police received a report that a 1998 Honda Accord had crashed into a utility pole on Linebrook Road.

    An accident reconstruction has estimated that Sullivan was traveling nearly twice the speed limit, 66 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone, on the wet road. She was also talking on a cell phone, Bailey said.

    Friends of the girls have said they believe Sullivan was racing to get Sparaco home in order to make a curfew.

    Helm was ordered held on $10,000 cash bail by Judge Robert Brennan, but is also being held without bail pending a hearing into whether he has violated his probation for a vandalism incident last August.

    On Sept. 11, Helm pleaded guilty to charges of wanton destruction of property and being disorderly, and was sentenced to six months of probation for kicking a car door in Ipswich.

    But that's comparatively minor compared to the other charges on Helm's record, which dates back to his teen years.

    While still a juvenile living in Florida, Helm was charged with aggravated assault on a police officer, robbery and larceny -- charges so serious that the state treated him as an adult, Bailey told the judge. He picked up a charge of grand theft and another assault and battery on a police officer the following year, and in 1996 spent a year in jail for assault and battery, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

    Since moving to Massachusetts, Bailey said, he's been charged with assault and battery, making threats, marijuana possession, and last August's vandalism charge.

    "Virtually as soon as he got here, he was involved in the court system," said Brennan, who found that Helm is not only a danger to the public but a flight risk.

    While Helm faces a maximum penalty of one year in jail if convicted on the new charge, the alleged violation of his probation in the August case exposes him to up to 2 1/2 years in jail.

    A decision on whether Helm will be sent to jail for violating his probation could come as early as next Thursday, when a violation of probation hearing is scheduled in Ipswich District Court.

    That's the same day Sullivan is due to appear for arraignment in the same court. She remains hospitalized. A $1,000 cash bail, set by a clerk magistrate, was posted by her parents. Sullivan is facing up to 15 years in prison if convicted. She's also awaiting trial on drunken driving charges stemming from an arrest on Oct. 24 in Hamilton.

    The case was heard yesterday in Newburyport because Ipswich District Court is closed on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. It will be moved back to Ipswich next week.

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    What is it going to take...
    MORE AGGRESSIVE PUBLIC EDUCATION AND MORE AGGRESSIVE ENFORCEMENT OF LAWS!
    I know it sounds too simple, but this is the case. Some are too busy to learn and are always in a hurry; so much so that they ignore/break the laws that would slow them down. For many, it's not about what is safe, but what is self-gratifying. They sometimes forget about the others that are in the vehicle with them. An often fatal mistake.
    And don't be fooled into believing that it's just the kids. It's not.
    There are plenty of older "risk-takers" out there. Their names populate the obituaries every day.
    Stay safe above all else.
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    I agree with you Art. I've always wondered why people can get a driver's license and just keep renewing it every five years until they reach a certain age (not sure what it is but usually you're elderly before this happens) and a doctor's medical must be obtained to deem you fit to drive. Granted this is for a regular class license, for commercial licenses you must have a medical done. I think people should have to do a road test at random, every year the licensing departments should randomly pick a group of names to "test". I know for myself, bad habits quickly develop over a period of time. I recently did my Class 4 license, which is a commercial license. I had to get a medical done and I had to do a road test. I was so damn nervous about that road test, because I knew what types of bad habits I had gotten into over the years, AND I'll be the first one to admit that I have a rather heavy foot when driving my POV. For weeks leaading up to the road test I concentrated very heavily on "breaking" those bad habits so they wouldn't cost me points on the test. It's easy to get oneself into the mindset of "oh, I've been driving for years, I've never had an accident, I know the capabilities of myself and my vehicle, I know the road like the back of my hand" and so on. I'm guilty of ALL those excuses, but with the recent loss of 3 lives on a stretch of road that I travel frequently, I've slowed down, paid more attention to what I am doing, etc. I dont' want to be a statistic.
    To the world you might be one person, but to one person you just might be the world.

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    More death due to a drunk Happend early yesterday morning. One of the guys on my shift went to school with 3 of the victims. What a waste.

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    GRRRRRRRRRRRRr drunk drivers make me so mad. You wanna kill yourself FINE, but don't put other people in jeopardy just because you are a dumbass The sad fact of the matter is that it's rarely the drunk who is the fatality, it's always some innocent in the wrong place at the wrong time. I can only hope that this guy gets a long, hard sentence; I was just going to say that I hope they take his license away permanently however I thought that would be a stupid statement, as people drive everyday without one. Our world has become one of survival of the fittest, you constantly have to watch your back no matter where you are, cuz the nutf**ks roam wild and free.
    To the world you might be one person, but to one person you just might be the world.

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    you constantly have to watch your back no matter where you are, cuz the nutf**ks roam wild and free.
    I have heard no truer words today!

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    The survivor is 20-year-old Matthew Panter.



    RIP Matthew.


    Today I got called to do a "First Removal", the body that I had to take to the funeral home was Matthew. I can't even begin to tell you how much that sickened me, how much of a waste I feel these four deaths (5 counting the unborn child) are. While part of my job is to move deceased parties to the funeral homes, it is usually people from middle age to the very elderly. Those who have passed on due to natural causes or illnesses. This was the first time I've moved a young person (I also saw one of the other victims when I dropped Matthew off, and that threw me a bit, was like looking at my own teenager) and it got to me a bit. But thankfully I have some really good friends who listened to me talk about it and how I felt about this whole situation and next time won't be so bad. But I sincerely hope there isn't a "next time" (to move a young person) for a really long time.
    To the world you might be one person, but to one person you just might be the world.

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    GO WHITE SOX!!!!!

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    Emotions high as teen held in drunken driving accident

    By JULIE MANGANIS

    Staff writer


    IPSWICH - Michelle Sullivan had been crying all morning, occasionally sobbing, as she awaited her arraignment on vehicular homicide charges yesterday morning.

    But when the handcuffs closed around her wrists, the 19-year-old became hysterical.

    "No, no, I didn't mean to do it," Sullivan wailed at court officers. "I'm so scared."

    Sullivan, who had been free on $1,000 bail, pleaded not guilty yesterday in Ipswich District Court to charges that include vehicular homicide while driving drunk and recklessly, and driving to endanger, a week after an accident on Linebrook Road that killed her friend, 17-year-old Lisa Sparaco of Ipswich.

    Judge Allen Swan raised Sullivan's bail to $10,000 on the new case, and then revoked her release in an Oct. 24 drunken driving arrest and ordered her held without bail.

    The decision to revoke bail in the earlier drunken driving case means that even if the Sullivan family posts the $10,000 bail, Sullivan, of 1 Cobblers Lane, Beverly, will remain at the state prison in Framingham for up to 60 days, or until the older drunken driving case is resolved.

    She could face up to 15 years in prison on the vehicular homicide charges.

    Sullivan was driving on a temporary, 15-day license issued after her Oct. 24 drunken driving arrest in Hamilton when, late on the night of Nov. 5, she headed down a rain-slicked Linebrook Road at nearly twice the speed limit, chatting on a cell phone and, police and prosecutors allege, drunk on malt liquor.

    Prosecutor John Brennan said Sullivan's green Honda Accord plowed into a utility pole, shearing the pole in half and embedding part of it in the side of the car - the side where Sparaco was sitting.

    As police arrived, Sullivan ran over and yelled, "Lisa is still in the car," Brennan told the judge. Sparaco, trapped in the wreckage, was "unresponsive," Brennan said.

    Police noted a strong odor of alcohol, the prosecutor said.

    Sullivan allegedly acknowledged to police that she had been drinking that night: "Yes, I had a 40-ouncer," she said, referring to a bottle of King Cobra malt liquor allegedly purchased for the teens by an acquaintance earlier that evening.

    "No, you had two 40-ouncers," passenger Nicole Pechilis, 18, allegedly yelled after overhearing Sullivan.

    As Brennan quoted Pechilis, Sullivan gasped.

    Refused Breathalyzer

    At Beverly Hospital, where she was taken for a broken rib and other injuries, Sullivan refused a blood alcohol test, but admitted to giving another man, David Helm, $10 to buy four 40-ounce bottles of cheap malt liquor, which she and her friends drank at the home of another friend, Rick Surpitski, Brennan said.

    Helm, who has pleaded not guilty to charges of providing alcohol to a minor, also appeared yesterday in Ipswich District Court for a probation violation hearing, but that hearing was postponed to Dec. 11 so that a newly appointed attorney, John Bjorlie, could prepare for a hearing. Helm is being held without bail for allegedly violating his probation in a malicious destruction of property case.

    Brennan had urged the judge to revoke Sullivan's release in the Oct. 24 arrest, saying she had shown "an utter disregard for the court's order that clearly delineated that she not get into trouble," and that the court's order had not deterred her from drinking and driving.

    Defense lawyer Lawrence Pidgeon argued that Sullivan should be allowed to go home with her parents, supervised by an electronic monitoring bracelet.

    He argued that Sullivan, a Hamilton-Wenham Regional High School graduate and day-care worker, had learning disabilities, including attention deficit disorder, and "she does not have the maturity of a 19-year-old, more the maturity of a 16-year-old."

    "Another life is before you that is at stake," said Pidgeon.

    He also challenged the strength of the Oct. 24 drunken driving charge, contending that her Breathalyzer readings of .06 and .07 could result in a verdict of not guilty (though under state law, a person under 21 can be convicted of drunken driving with a level as low as .02). Sullivan has already asked for a jury trial in that case; a pretrial hearing is scheduled for Dec. 8 in Peabody District Court.

    Swan was unpersuaded, and he granted the prosecutor's requests. He also granted Brennan's motion that Sullivan immediately be taken to the Ipswich police station, next door to the courthouse, to be fingerprinted and photographed.

    Courthouse melee

    That led to some tense moments outside the courthouse.

    As Sullivan was being led in handcuffs from the courthouse to the police station, she nearly collapsed, screaming and crying, "I can't do it."

    While a television news crew attempted to videotape her being brought into the police station, relatives of Sullivan blocked the camera.

    One of her uncles, Robert Sullivan, 47, of Medford, shoved reporter Pam Cross and photographer Stan Forman of Beverly, and then, as a police officer tried to pull him away, made obscene remarks to the cameraman. That led to Robert Sullivan being arrested and charged with two counts of assault and battery and being disorderly. He pleaded not guilty to those charges at an arraignment later yesterday morning, and was released on $500 bail, with an order to stay away from Forman and Cross.

    Mary Sullivan of Medford, an aunt of the defendant, said her niece was "very upset and very frightened" about what had happened to her friend and what was going to happen to her. Later, she bore the wrath of other family members for speaking to the press.

    Outside the courthouse, Sparaco's mother and stepfather spoke briefly about their daughter, who did not live with them.

    Marcia and Gary Ricci of Peabody insist they had no idea that Sparaco, still in high school, was living in Massachusetts again until Oct. 28, just a week before the fatal accident. They said they thought the girl was living in New Jersey with her father, though they had asked her to return and attend school in Peabody.

    "She had her own way of doing things," said Marcia Ricci. "I'm going to miss her a whole lot."

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