Thread: Next Big Thing?

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    Default Next Big Thing?

    Time for a Friday blow off the rest of the work day thread.

    What in your opinion will be the next big technology to change the fire service.

    Examples:

    Motorized Fire Apparatus

    Portable Radios

    SCBAs

    Thermal Imagers

    What is next, what is the next revolution
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    Talking Well..........

    The best would be a huge infusion of COMMON SENSE.
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    but if we infuse common sense we won't need many more innovations since our call volume would probably be cut to zip

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    Common sence in not an eligible participant, it has little to do with technology.

    Unless we can lobotomize people and incert computer chips to replace their brains.

    While a very attractive concept (I have many candidates in mind) it would likely be impossible due to union opposition.

    Common sence in the general populace, and the resulting decline in runs and calls, is complete and ludicris fantasy. I would have to overdose on Acid just to imagine such a senario.

    Well, back to technology, I have a few in mind, but I was waiting to hear some other opinions.
    -Brotherhood: I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.
    -Mistakes: It could be that the purpose of you life is to serve as a warning to others.

    -Adversity: That which does not kill me postpones the inevitable.

    -Despair: Its always darkest before it goes Pitch Black.

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    I'm curious as to when jumpsuits will replace the bunker pant and coat uniform, it has several advantages. No risk of any hot water/gas or so on geetting under your bunker coat and up into you, although risk of that is pretty slim as of now, you would still have your upper section always on you as well.

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    I'm curious as to when jumpsuits will replace the bunker pant and coat uniform, it has several advantages.
    Can you still wear 3/4 boots with them??

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    The EMS field equipment is developing fast. What I would like to see is improvement in high rise equipment. I see those Oshkosh Units for the airports I wonder if it is possible to build units like that for street use, they are pretty nice units. Possible was to fight fires in tall buildings with air units spraying into the windows. I am sure Thermal cameras will be developing into smaller units with better imaging. I have seen helmet mount units but they are still bulky.
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    The military has been playing with a data link system since about the first Gulf War that allows units to share information such as their location, the location of enemy units and terrain conditions. At first it was a big unit which was only mounted in armored units, but it is almost down to the point where individual troops can carry a hemlet mounted heads up display which displays various bits of data as customized by the user or his commander. The system also allows the commander to see exactly where his troops are and what they are doing.

    Eventually we will see some variation of this technology reach us (TIC's are also a military spin off). We will be able to carry a helmet mounted HUD which ties into our personal TIC (which will continue to get cheaper and smaller). Our data link will receive information such as the location of other FF'rs, instructions from the boss, and hazard locations. Command will have a better grasp over what is happening inside and be able to quickly change the plan of attack as conditions change.
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    Default Re: Well..........

    Originally posted by hwoods
    The best would be a huge infusion of COMMON SENSE.
    Are we talking about among the public? Or among fire chiefs?


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    Originally posted by E40FDNYL35
    Fire Safety taken seriously in the US.
    Ray, you're a funny guy

    What I think is that the next big thing will not be on a fire truck or on a fire fighters back.

    I think the next big thing will be a combination of residential sprinklers and water mist technology.

    The insurance cos. are going to get on this bandwagon someday and will make it finanicially attractive for people to install residential sprinklers. The technology is "there". All studies indicate a radical savings in life and property.

    Water mist technology is being rapidly developed in order to serve as a cost efficient and safe replacement for halogenated agents. AS this technology evolves, it will be cheaper and easier to maintain than conventional sprinkler systems. It will cause less water damage, even to electronic equipment than we have seen in the past. It will be an attractive alternative to dry chemical, CO2 and halon.

    If this happens, the result will be a radical decline in fires. They will not be eliminated completely, as we could never reach every building and element of society. But fewer fires mean fewer deaths, fewer injuries, less fire damage and a whole lot fewer fire service funerals.

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    Default For FYRHWK1....

    I've seen the jump suits you're talking about in ads from Globe in some old Firehouse magazines I inherited. Late 70's or early 80's vintage. I've also seen them in more recent footage of Navy firefighters. I have a feeling I know why they didn't sell, but it's only an opinion so I'll keep it to myself.

    As far as what I'd like to see in the future, I agree with the statements about Fire Safety and Home Sprinklers. I'd also like to see legislation either requiring homeowners to post some sort of "out front" notification of lightweight (i.e. non-firefighter friendly) building materials, or (and I know this is a fantasy) outlawing them altogether. We all know architects, contractors and homeowners don't consider these things when they put a house up, so we have to after it's there. Perhaps something similar in design to the NFPA haz-mat sign with one section for construction materials, one for heating methods, one for special residents (invalid, mentally or physically challenged, assistance animals, etc.) and one for any special hazards (home oxygen, indoor pool (don't laugh, we have some in my district and I know of a few in others nearby and you wouldn't know it from the front or even a walk around size up), auto-body equipment in the garage, etc.). Unfortunately no one can legislate common sense so we have to try and get someone to use the good ideas that come up to mitigate people's lake of it.

    As far as technology, I can see SCBA/TIC combination units with in mask HUDs. For Communications I can see helmets with built in communications set ups, further on down the road something similar to the military data-link set up previously mentioned in this thread. I don't see apparatus changing much beyond improved safety features and easier operation. When you think about it, they haven't really changed much since day one. Get it there and get the wet stuff on the red stuff.
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    In regard to those jump suits - which Globe manufacture(d)- and are/were used by the Navy. I have heard from a friend who was a Damage Controlman in the Navy - that they have gone away from using them- and are beginning to use 'regular' turnouts. Not sure if this is entirely true - as it was word of mouth from him.

    I got my hands on one once- wasn't all that comfortable if you ask me. There are a lot of tasks on the fireground that require you to use your hands, and arms over your head. As well as bending and crouching. If you have ever worn - even a normal set of coveralls, you will realize that when you raise you arms over your head, the crotch also rises an equal amount

    That - and it is alot harder to bleed off excess heat. With a 'body suit' - the best you can do is 'unzip'. At least with a bunker coat - you can remove the coat in its entirety -- and bleed off alot more heat from your torso, and lower your core temperature.
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    I think by mid decade, we will see great improvements on a lot of things.

    TIC/SCBA intergration- I think before 2010, you will see smaller and smaller TIC units that each and every firefighter can wear. It will be intergrated right into your helmet. It will have a small eyepiece you can look into like a helicopter pilot can now. It will be so light you won't even know it's there. Look at how night vision has evolved. SCBA's will be smaller, lighter and more capacity. They will be able to pinpoint a firefighter's location within 2 feet. This is already a reality in the military. Eventually this will be de-classified and given to the civilian population.

    Vehicles- There seems to be a trend with smaller, "quick-attack vehicles." I think you will see more of this. Also on the other end of the scale, heavy rescues seem to be getting bigger.

    Gear- I think you will see improvements on comfort, weight and fit of turn out gear. Newer, lightweight fabrics are coming that will give even better protection than what we have now.

    Also I think and hope there will be a bigger push for residential sprinklers. Like stated before, I think the insurance companies will get on board with that idea and push for it.

    *Administrators will finally realize we are not full of crap and actually understand the needs of the fire service and give us all the money we ask for. We will have better budgets and less red tape.

    Well, I guess all but the last one we will see someday......

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    Originally posted by FFMcDonald
    In regard to those jump suits - which Globe manufacture(d)- and are/were used by the Navy. I have heard from a friend who was a Damage Controlman in the Navy - that they have gone away from using them- and are beginning to use 'regular' turnouts. Not sure if this is entirely true - as it was word of mouth from him.

    I got my hands on one once- wasn't all that comfortable if you ask me. There are a lot of tasks on the fireground that require you to use your hands, and arms over your head. As well as bending and crouching. If you have ever worn - even a normal set of coveralls, you will realize that when you raise you arms over your head, the crotch also rises an equal amount

    That - and it is alot harder to bleed off excess heat. With a 'body suit' - the best you can do is 'unzip'. At least with a bunker coat - you can remove the coat in its entirety -- and bleed off alot more heat from your torso, and lower your core temperature.
    Well, you can unzip the top half and roll it down, the advantage there is you've always got the upper portion on you, if you take your coat off you could lose it. I agree with the comfort though, I'd hope that if someone seriously thought about it they'd put some real effort into a good design, I tried out a jumpsuit for skiing, fairly thick as well, and I had the same problems you mentioned.

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