1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,744

    Default Phone Number portability

    If this has been hashed before; I apologize........

    Does this scare anyone as much as me? On November 24 the FCC has ruled that customers will be able to keep their own phone number when changing cell carriers or even to keep their home number as the cell number.

    OK, so what happens when you dial 911? In Massachusetts your call goes to the State Police and they try and figure out where you are so they can transfer the call. Most of the time they just take the info and then forward the info, denying the local department the ability to "interrogate" the caller.

    Furthermore until the GPS system for cell phones is mandatory and in place, there will be no way to determine where the call is coming from. So in this case, if you dialed 911 and then were overcome by smoke, or passed out, or whatever...there would just be an open line, no address information.

    Exchange information will no longer be a reliable way to determine where a call might be coming from(not that it was ever reliable, but..), as you can take your Los Angeles phone number with you when you move to Pucketsville.

    Me thinks the ball was dropped here in a big way, all in the name of the consumer and convience. We fought so hard for so long for Ehanced 911, only to have it neutralized by a ruling like this.

    Any other thoughts out there,

    Dave
    Last edited by hfd66truck; 11-11-2003 at 09:24 AM.

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    N2DFire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    S.W. Virginia
    Posts
    1,286

    Default

    O.K. - I admit up front that I haven't been able to read & research this very much, however I think that while the portability of numbers will cause problems, I don't think they will be on such an expanded scope.
    as you can take your Los Angeles phone number with you when you move to Huntsville.
    I don't see this as happening. In fact I don't even see it as being feasible what with Area codes & what not.

    I think the intention of cell number portability was for local issues. For example - in my area we are very rural and some portions of the county have NO cellular coverage. I have had service with what was the leading provider for almost 10 years (same number), now say I decide that since Company Y has just built a new tower a stones throw from our station and their service is better that I would really like to switch, but after 10 years of having the same number it would be a real pain to have to notify everyone of my new number. This is a device that the cellular companies are using to try and retain customers. I mean just look at all the "newer and better" rate plans that seem to come out every couple of weeks. Or all the new features they are packing into phones for "no additional charge". If it weren't for having to switch numbers, some people would be switching service providers every year for the best deal.

    It is this situation that I think the portability requirements are designed to address. Not me taking the same number from here in VA to say Cali. - I just don't see how you could even do that (or for that matter why you would want to). Who would want to live in Cali but have a long distance number back to VA for their cell phone ??

    Maybe I missed something in the deal somewhere, but these are my thoughts thus far.

    As for the cellular GPS & location issues - well hopefully the current requirements will (eventually) solve the problem. Until then I don't see the portability issue really affecting this anyway.
    Last edited by N2DFire; 11-11-2003 at 09:43 AM.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    FFMcDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    N 41* 2.770' W 74* 7.338'
    Posts
    272

    Default

    If you read the information on the FCC website -- you cannot carry the number with you if you move to a different area code.
    Marc

    "In Omnia Paratus"

    Member - IACOJ
    "Got Crust?"

    -- The opinions presented here are my own; and are not those of any organization that I belong to, or work for.

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    2 miles past sane 3 miles before crazy
    Posts
    288

    Default

    I was under the impression that the way 911 calls from cell phones worked was that it went to the 911 center closest to the first tower your call hits... Which couuld narrow you down to a county.. still not really much help if its just an open line, huh?
    The opinions I post to these forums do not represent any entity to which I am affiliated.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    MrJim911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    225

    Default

    As a 911 Telecommunicator I can say that this is a big problem. How big we don't know yet. For the present time, you are only able to port numbers that are within the same general "local area". The ultimate "plan" some day is to be able to take your number(s) with you when you move... all of the way across the country.

    Note that ONLY the 100 largest MSAs must initially comply with the Order effective November 24th.

    As for 9-1-1 call routing, there is really no one correct answer. What will happen and how depends to a great extent on the telcos and wireless carriers involved. How your PSAP(s) currently receive wireless 9-1-1 calls (on POTS, phase zero, phase 1, phase 2, etc.) and how selective routing is handled in your area, and so on will play a major part in how messy it is and how long it takes the mess to clean itself up in terms of database corrections, etc.

    Before anyone gets too excited about this being a "terrible thing", you should remember that the FCC pressed hard for portability as a means to stimulate competition and provide the greatest number of service options for the consumer.

    As wireless carriers' networks become more and more "similar" in terms of coverage and features, the one thing that will set them apart is customer service. If K-Mart treats you poorly, you can drive down the street to Target.

    In two weeks, you'll have the same choices with your wireless carrier.

    There are many who believe that were it not for competition in the telcom industry, the phone in your kitchen would still have a crank on the side of it and long distance calls would cost 50 cents per minute. These are definately interesting times!

  6. #6
    Early Adopter
    cozmosis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,925

    Default Re: Phone Number portability

    Originally posted by hfd66truck
    OK, so what happens when you dial 911?
    In my area, cell calls to 911 hit the nearest tower and go the communications center for that area. Having a different phone number should not change that.

    As far as not knowing the exact location of a cell phone caller... that's a problem now regardless of the phone number. The only thing our dispatcher get on the 911 screen is the address of the cell tower where the call is coming from.

    Exchange information will no longer be a reliable way to determine where a call might be coming from (not that it was ever reliable, but..)?
    In my area, the cell phone companies already have regional exchanges and have had such for many years. Cell exchanged don't tell you much. For instance, an 460 prefix (land line) in my hometown could be narrowed down to a city. An 818 prefix (cell phone) could be narrowed down to about a dozen counties.

    We fought so hard for so long for Ehanced 911, only to have it neutralized by a ruling like this
    As a consumer, I think this is a good thing. As a member of the emergency services, I don't think this "neutralizes" E-911.

  7. #7
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,744

    Default

    As far as not knowing the exact location of a cell phone caller... that's a problem now regardless of the phone number. The only thing our dispatcher get on the 911 screen is the address of the cell tower where the call is coming from
    Right Coz, but if people start using cell phones as their home phones, which this new regulation will allow, now you are making the problem bigger.

    In my area, the cell phone companies already have regional exchanges and have had such for many years. Cell exchanged don't tell you much.
    Right but as was stated here earlier, in the future you will be able to take your Los Angeles phone number with you when you move to Orlando. Hence the portability part. So for example, I buy a cell phone in San Diego, its my home and cell phone, so I only have one number. I get transferred to Boston. Because of the new regs I take my cell number with me. I don't get a land line in Boston either. I need an ambulance and call 911. In Massachusetts this call would be routed to the State Police in Framingham, I am not sure if it shows nearest site info or not. It is then up to the State Police to determine where the emergency is.

    And with all due respect, in many ways this will "neutralize" Enhanced 911, as we will no longer get address information with the call.

    Dave

  8. #8
    dazed and confused
    Resq14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    We're talking about 2 different things here.

    The FCC ruling is just about being able to keep your phone number, or if you move, to give your cell phone your old home phone #.

    On a cell phone, depending on which stage of wireless 911 compliancy your area is in, 911 calls are all typically routed to a common locations already predetermined, such as SP barracks, etc. If you are higher up on the tech factor, and support newer initiatives, then GPS can play a role in then routing your call to an appropriate agency.

    I think the issue you raised about having 1 phone number ringing at two different physical locations IS important, but not for the cellular reason since that works as above. Landline exchanges can ring at more than 1 physical location. I know in our state though, only 1 location will be shown on your ALI screen. You would have to notice that the phone number is a special type (we get information about residential, commercial/pbx, centrex, ring down lines, 1 way and 2 way payphones, etc), and call the phone company to get the other physical addresses.

    This could be a very big problem. Same with PBX's and Centrex's that don't pass encode and pass along ALI... you get called to MegaOffice Building, and it just shows the adress to the front door or utility room, and the phone number to the main centrex system. This can be very annoying. Communities should develop ordinances to prohibit this.

    So regardless of what your phone number is on wireless 911, it is either a pre-determined call center that answers (usually based on geographic proximity), or based on GPS data.
    Last edited by Resq14; 11-11-2003 at 10:22 PM.
    God Bless America!Remember all have given some, but some have given all.
    Google Is Your Friend™Helpful forum tip - a "must see" if you're new here
    Click this to search FH Forums!

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,744

    Default

    I think the issue you raised about having 1 phone number ringing at two different physical locations IS important, but not for the cellular reason since that works as above. Landline exchanges can ring at more than 1 physical location. I know in our state though, only 1 location will be shown on your ALI screen.
    I actually raised that as an existing issue, not part of this new reg. The movement with this reg will be for people to do away with their landlines and just carry their cell phone. That is what concerns me. I agree when the GPS technology becomes more common, it will be less of a problem, but here we are a long way from that.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    Dave1105's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    148

    Default

    I understand that the US has very different laws regarding privacy and such as to what we have and our phone systems differ out here.... but I think the problem in this conversation lies with people not fully understanding the teleco industry and how these things are going to work. Keep in mind I know little about the US teleco industry and this is all from an Australian POV so it may all be out of wack as far as the US is concerned. I'll give my two cents anyway though....

    Home Phone Portability out here has been around for a while. You have the ability to take your home telephone number with you as long as you stay in the same state area code (With a few exceptions when you move from urban to rural areas, but rule of thumb says you can). You guys need to start looking at this as a purely cosmetic change. The number looks like the phone is in town/county/state/whatever X to a person, but the phone companies databases and records know it's in Y. When you dial 911, the call will still go to the right place and the information the dispatcher will get will be correct as long as your databases are kept up-to-date. We have a national database out here for our emergency services to use, so this isn't a problem. I don't know how it works in the us?

    As far as home phone's go I don't see how problems can arise with your 911 system, as long as databases are kept up-to-date. The problem here is for the consumer, how are you supposed to know which numbers are local and which are long-distance when area codes get a little mish-matched?

    Now mobile phones are a different kettle of fish. Detirmining the origin of a mobile phone call has always been a problem for the emergency services and until we get some kind of GPS system on all of them the inherant problems with them will stay just that, inherant. I'm not sure what happens in the US, but out here when a call is placed from a mobile phone our call-centers get not only the address of the tower it's accessing from, but also the address as to which the mobile phone is registered with. With mobile phone portablility (which has been in affect here for about a year and a half), none of this changes. The information the caller recieves is still the same. Don't worry about calls not getting to the right place with mobiles, the number is cosmetic, the phone companies know where each phone is when it places a call. They have to be to charge you accordingly.

    So for example, I buy a cell phone in San Diego, its my home and cell phone, so I only have one number. I get transferred to Boston. Because of the new regs I take my cell number with me. I don't get a land line in Boston either. I need an ambulance and call 911. In Massachusetts this call would be routed to the State Police in Framingham, I am not sure if it shows nearest site info or not. It is then up to the State Police to determine where the emergency is.
    I don't understand why anyone would want to do this, not having a home phone is ludicrous out here as you would pay through the nose. However we do have systems comming into place that allow your mobile and your home phone to be on the same number. When a call is placed to the number, all phones in the house ring, as well as all mobiles attached to that number, it is then answered as normal. We also have systems out here that allow your mobile to "Roam" as to whether it's at home or not. You have a base-station at your house that allows your mobile to connect though it (and hence a land-line) while it's in range and as you move away you connect to your mobile carrier as you normally would. These also work with just the one phone number. However, phone companies (in order to charge appropriately) know whether the call is placed from the mobile, or from home.... so information sent to the dispatchers at 000 (our 911 equivilent) is correct.

    You need to start seeing the phone numbers as a purely cosmetic thing. When you move physical location the systems adjust appropriately..... this really doesn't change much.

  11. #11
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,744

    Default

    dave,

    The purpose of this regulation is to make the companies compete in a more ven marketplace. the reality is that many people will chose not to have a land line phone, only a cell phone. In fact it is already being done. The number issue isn't a big deal, its the fact that someone could take a number from one area, have it assigned to a cell phone, and then use it in an area where that number would normally never be. Enhanced 911 would not work, because its a cell phone call. And the Dispatcher would not recognize the number as even being from that State.

    I realize this isn't a huge issue, but having worked in communications for 10 plus years, it is taking one more tool away from the dispatcher in some cases. My biggest concern has more to do with people using a cell phone as their only phone, the numbers game is what is allowing that to happen.

    Dave

  12. #12
    dazed and confused
    Resq14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,993

    Question I'm confused -- no real new issues here

    hfd66truck,

    Maybe I'm not being clear. Routing of cellular calls is completely different from routing of landline calls at this point, regardless of the cell phone number (at least in areas without advanced wireless locating technology). And it's been this way: this isn't anything new.

    From the cellular switching station, the cell company passes on a dumb phone number to E-911, rather than using the phone number to the cell company site. It doesn't care what your cell phone's area code or phone number is... it just throws it as simple Caller ID to the 911 office, which then sends it to the pre-determined PSAP for cell calls.

    In normal landline emergency calls, your phone number is associated with an emergency service number. The ESN corresponds to a certain combination of police/fire/medical agencies, and dictates where your call gets sent to. So the response is based on the ESN that's passed along with the phone number.

    Cellphones with GPS units pass along the location, and the call is then placed it within the correct emergency service zone. This gives you a relatively close location PLUS the agencies that should respond.

    Soooooo if you live in Boston, and say you're cell phone number is the same as your house phone number, and then you go to Maine and dial 911 on your phone, the call does not go to Boston. It goes to predefinged answering points in our state.

    This is no different than the current situation of cell phones in the state of maine, a non-compliant advanced phase cellular E-911 state. If I go out and buy one today, it does the same thing regardless of what the phone number is or where I am. That is what makes the GPS unit and advance cellular E-911 key, as it ultimately relays your CURRENT location to the PSAP.

    See the difference? Cell phone numbers mean nothing, other than to call back the phone or do an offline search of who the number is registered to. Even if it's a shared home phone landline # that rings with the cell phone (usually they don't ring simultaneously, it's forwarded after x rings to the cell phone), it doesn't matter. So the only real concern here is not having a landline phone in your house, and using only a cell phone... and like I said, that's been a problem for a while... I don't see how it's a numbers game. No matter how you or the phone company arrange your cell phone/home phone, unless your state has got some fancy technology, it does not matter a bit. You should still be able to dial 911 from a phone, even if you have canceled your landline phone service.

    If your issue is a procedural one, where the State Police are not forwarding calls to approrpriate agencies, that is easily correctable. Maine SP forwards cell calls to me routinely... sometimes they stay on and listen, but most likely they release from the call.

    Dave1105, you're lucky you get cell site address and cell phone owner info passed along. I wish we even had that! The day will come when this won't be a problem across the US, hopefully sooner rather than later.

    Another annoying thing: broadband internet phones. When they first came out, the internet phones had the same problem as cell phones with respect to 911... they reflected the phone # and address of the cable company. I believe they have now incorporated some type of ANI/ALI translator between your account and your physical location, and then send this out in ANI/ALI with the call.
    Last edited by Resq14; 11-11-2003 at 11:27 PM.
    God Bless America!Remember all have given some, but some have given all.
    Google Is Your Friend™Helpful forum tip - a "must see" if you're new here
    Click this to search FH Forums!

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    Dave1105's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    148

    Default

    Is anyone here able to write me up a quick definition on exactly what Enhanced 911 is? Because from what I'm reading here it doesn't sound very "Enhanced" at all.... we've had a more advanced system than what I'm appearing to see here in place for years and ususally out here in australia we're trailing behind by miles.... My Turnout coat is made of wool for christs sake!! ;-) ;-)

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    MrJim911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    225

    Default

    I've been trying to follow this... Lets see..

    Enhanced 911 is we get call back number and location of the caller from a land line.


    On to cellular...


    In the US not all 911 centers get the same information from cellular callers. There are currently 3 Phases of cellular technology.

    Phase 0 means a 911 center doesn't get anything on their ANI/ALI except the cellular tower location which means absolutely nothing.

    Phase I means you get the call back number of the cell phone.

    Phase II means you get call back number along with a approximate location of the caller.

    By now the majority of 911 centers have Phase I. Very few have Phase II.


    Dave, It's not ludicrous at all to want to get rid of your landline when all you need is a cell phone. I'm one of thoe people. I have high speed cable internet. I have no need for any telephone line in my house. My wife and myself each have a cell phone. Why would we want a landline? Experts say roughly 5 million people have given up landline for cellular only over the past 5 years. 4% of cell phone users don't have a landline and 15% of current land/cell owners say they will drop their landline service in the next 5 years. This is why the US government is pushing the cellular carriers to implement Phase II ASAP.

    Also we don't have ay problems with landlines and 911 for the most part in the US. Problems start with cellular phones.

  15. #15
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,744

    Default

    Dave, It's not ludicrous at all to want to get rid of your landline when all you need is a cell phone. I'm one of thoe people. I have high speed cable internet. I have no need for any telephone line in my house. My wife and myself each have a cell phone. Why would we want a landline? Experts say roughly 5 million people have given up landline for cellular only over the past 5 years. 4% of cell phone users don't have a landline and 15% of current land/cell owners say they will drop their landline service in the next 5 years. This is why the US government is pushing the cellular carriers to implement Phase II ASAP.
    And this is exactly my point.....this regulation will make it more desirable to give up your land line, which means less people will have them, and since the E-911 for cell phones is as you described, we as emergency service workers will lose the ability to get reliable ani/ali info for these people.

    I agree Phase II is where we need to go, but until then we will be losing valuable information for those people that chose to give up their landline.

    Maybe I wasn't explaining myself well enough before, and hopefully this will clear it up.

    Dave1105,

    Enhanced 911 works this way; (For Massachusetts -should be similar everywhere)

    You dial 911,

    Your ANI (Automatic Number Identification, aka phone number) is immediately displayed at the PSAP(Public Safety Answering Point),

    Your ANI info is sent to Syracuse NY to the phone company database computer and matched to your ALI (Automatic Location Indentification) which is for the most part based on phone company billing information.

    Your ALI is then sent to the PSAP as well. All this takes seconds to accomplish, and the end result is when the Calltaker answers the phone they will immediately see the number from where the call is being made, and within seconds they will see the address as well. The ALI screen will also include which agencies are Primary repsonse to the address for Police Fire and Medical.

    Since cell phone are not tied to an address, this is my concern with the whole portability issue, the loss of this information.

    Can we still do our job...yes. Will the loss of ANI/ALI be an issue on every call.....no. But the one time it would have mattered, it will be huge.

    Dave

  16. #16
    Forum Member
    MrJim911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    225

    Default

    An annoyance, yes. But with proper call handling techniques we will still get the required information regardless of what the ANI/ALI does or does not tell us. But your right in that incidents may happen where it might make the difference between a good call and a bad call.

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    Dave1105's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    148

    Default

    Dave, It's not ludicrous at all to want to get rid of your landline when all you need is a cell phone.
    As I said in my post, all my opinions are from an australian POV and with mobile pricing being as it is out here not having a landline would be throwing money away. For example, on a landline I can call my next-door neighbour for as long as I like and only pay 15c for the call. Regardless of whether it was 5 minutes or 5 hours. On a mobile, i'll be looking at a per-minute rate of anywhere up to 50 - 60c a minute.... Of course we have deals out here that will mean it's not THAT bad, but these deals are still going to cost you a couple of dollars... when the same call on a landline would only be 15c. The only people I know of who don't have a landline are students who share houses together and don't want to split bills....

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    MrJim911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    225

    Default

    Understood. In the US we don't pay by the minute. We get thousands of free minutes to use. You don't pay unless you go over those alotted minutes. Plus we get so many more perks then is offered by the telephone company. It's only a matter of time until there are no more landlines anywhere...

    Anyway, I hope we clarified 911 in the US at least a little and didn't make it more confusing....

  19. #19
    dazed and confused
    Resq14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    Ok so I guess I still didn't understand the point.

    MrJim911 wrote, "Experts say roughly 5 million people have given up landline for cellular only over the past 5 years. 4% of cell phone users don't have a landline and 15% of current land/cell owners say they will drop their landline service in the next 5 years. This is why the US government is pushing the cellular carriers to implement Phase II ASAP."

    I think the flexibility to retain your home number is a RESULT of the switch to cells, and not the cause.

    REGARDLESS, lots of people have operated on cell phones only for a long time. We've been dealing with it. Might it make an already extremely attractive option a little bit more attractive? Ya it probably will. I doubt it will do more than increasing landline phone bills or decreasing cell phone bills will, though. So I guess that was the point, and I guess I misunderstood.
    God Bless America!Remember all have given some, but some have given all.
    Google Is Your Friend™Helpful forum tip - a "must see" if you're new here
    Click this to search FH Forums!

  20. #20
    Forum Member
    MrJim911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    225

    Default

    The point, I think, is that the FCC allowing this poses problems for the 911 industry which effects all other public safety industries.

  21. #21
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,744

    Default

    Yes, Jim, that was the point. Since it makes things more convienient, it will also have the potential of causes us more problems.....

  22. #22
    Early Adopter
    cozmosis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,925

    Default

    Originally posted by Dave1105
    As I said in my post, all my opinions are from an australian POV and with mobile pricing being as it is out here not having a landline would be throwing money away.
    Some cell phone companies here now have unlimited usage plans. You pay a certain fee (I think the going rate is about $70/mo) and you can talk as long as you want on your cell phone to whoever you want in your calling area.

  23. #23
    Forum Member
    Weruj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    7,857

    Default

    Dave,
    Great thread ..........I never gave that much of a thought but now that it was explained to me call takers will have to be more diligent in there skills and will (in my center) emphsize the need to verify the info from ANI/ALI before disconnecting.....thanks for the info ...
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  24. #24
    Forum Member
    nmfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maryland (DC Suburb)
    Posts
    5,738

    Default

    Rember guys... ANI/ALI is like a thermal imager. It is a TOOL in our box of tricks. It is not and never has been free of flaws or malfunctions. The data can be entered wrong, the system could hicup, etc. It is not a subsititute for "OK, ma'am, where is the emergency, what number are you calling from, and what is your name?"

    The location tracking thing is becoming a joke. It was supposed to be done how many years ago?? The thing is, it doesn't make money like PTT, wireless web, and taking pictures do so it gets the back burner like everything else important. They cry to the FCC that they "just can't do it in that amount of time"... but they did everything else. Do you know there is a Java application for sprint phones that will allow you to watch TV on your phone?? That great, I can watch the breaking news in Iraq but the thing can't tell the dispatcher where I am with GPS technology that has been around for eons.

    So many people with cell phones that call in emergencies are so oblivious to what is going on around them, it probably won't change much anyway. It gets to a point where there is so much stupidity, that adding more is throwing a flare into a gasoline tanker that is already fully involved.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  25. #25
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,744

    Default

    NM,

    Excellent points....I always taught the who what where when, regardless of the enviroment you were working in. ANI / ALI just confirmed the data.

    And with those new picture phones they can take a picture of their house burning and send it to us, that way we'll know what we got before we get there.

    Dave

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register