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  1. #1
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    Default Whats on your heavy rescue?

    Ok here is my question. My dept is considering the idea of buying a heavy rescue for use through our the county as the designated RIT team and all special hazard incidents. The basic design will be a walk around rescue with a 6 man custom can with a possible command center. Looking for 8 full size compartments, and the stairs and walk way to the roof for access to the roof compartments. Each compartment will have a designated use which are, RIT, Auto extrication, Haz-mat, diver/water rescue, medical/ mass casulaty, air, salvage/overhaul, and technical rescue (con space, high angle etc.) The lighting aspect would be provided by 2 light towers. My question to each of you is how would you outfit this apparatus if it were yours, what would go in each compartment to fulfill its role. The main desired features are a pto generator, and for the air set up a compressor, and a cascade (4-6, 6000psi bottles)Ok I am done here so ladies and gentlemen have at it and use your imagination.
    After I'm dead I'd rather have people ask why I have no monument than why I have one

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  2. #2
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    I'd go as big as you can get, As you get more involved in working as a rescue company you'll want more space and equipment and will need more space. It is better that you have an empty compartment now then have the rig stuffed upon delivery.

    Go big

    As for the equipment try to put all the pin in gear in one compartment Confined space in another, Water in another, All the saws in their own compartment. It beats running around the rig looking for stuff.
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    Last edited by ADSNWFLD; 11-14-2003 at 10:10 AM.

  3. #3
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    We just got one delivered that FEMA paid for with a 2002 FireACT, so I went through what you're doing right now about 12 months ago. I still go by the best advice I've ever been given about spec'ing a truck: make a list of all of the equipment you want to carry. If you have it already, lay it out and figure out how much compartment space you'll need. Make a list of the toys you want on it, pretty much like you started doing here, dual light towers, cascade, pre-connected hydraulic tools, air lines, electric reels, etc, etc. Don't forget the RV-style awning for protection from the weather. Think they're about $2000 from any manufacturer. Bumper mounted hydraulic tools are a great thing. Much safer on the street and quicker than hitting a side compartment. We have a combie tool on the bumper since the majority of pin-ins just need a door popped.

    Look at your station and your response area and see what your limit is on truck size and weight. Because of our station size, we were limited to a truck 32.5' long max, so that left us with an 18' rescue body as the longest we could go. We wanted a PTO pump and water tank on it and b/c of the 18' body instead of 21' body we were limited to 250gpm/250gal instead of 500/500. Not a big deal in our minds, 250/250 is more than enough for what we planned on using it for.

    Run around all of the manufacturers' web sites and look at the new deliveries pages. Most have features listed so you can get an idea what can be crammed on it. Visit or call the people that got trucks that seem to have what you want on them. I called a rescue captain in Maryland and talked with him for about an hour on what they went through when designing their truck. The other hard and fast rule is that no matter how much planning anyone did, there's always something that they missed or wished they had done differently.

    If you think you'll fill a lot of SCBA bottles, go with 6-8 cascade bottles. Almost every sales rep I asked about an on board compressor said don't do it. Costs run $20-30K, and maintenance is high because of having to change filters and clean the system often. Think about where these trucks get parked: right next to a bunch of other diesels spewing crap, and all of that gets sucked into the compressor system no matter how good the filters are. 4-6000psi bottles is good for 32-4500psi SCBAs, so run from there.

    ADSNWFLD is right on with the organization of the truck. Make sure you have the room to keep related stuff together. Everyone knows when the adrenaline is pumping FFs lose their mind and won't remember where everything is specifically, but at least if they know which compartment is for what they have a fighting chance. We all try not to go crazy, but in the heat of the moment we all do. Just the nature of the beast.

    Happy building.

    Brian
    Brian P. Vickers
    www.vickersconsultingservices.com
    Emergency Services Consulting
    Westlake VFD - Houston, TX
    Proud Member IACOJ - Redneck Division

  4. #4
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    BC I can agree with the idea of being against a truck mounted compressor, however, on of the main functions of this apparatus will be as a mobile air unit. The main thing I was looking for is to find out what equipment you keep in your compartments, maybe you have something that I havent thought of. As I mentioned when I started the thread each compartment will have its own use, so Im working on an inventory list so to speak. The size of the apparatus shouldnt be a concern for the station, if I am not mistaken we have just about 36-38 feet and we will not be specing any water or pump on it which should help keep it a bit lighter even though the floor weight will not be an issue either.
    After I'm dead I'd rather have people ask why I have no monument than why I have one

    Official Minister of Philosophy of the IACOJ

    IACOJ Probie Crusty of the year 2003

  5. #5
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    Instead of wanting a water pump and tank on it why doesnt your department consider a tri-max cafs system .
    It doesnt take up much space at all on our light rescue / ambulance.
    And it has come in handy a few times .
    Last edited by k1500chevy97; 11-17-2003 at 10:58 AM.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by k1500chevy97
    Instead of wanting a water pump and tank on it why doesnt your department consider a tri-max cafs system .
    It doesnt take up much space at all on our light rescue / ambulance.
    And it has come in handy a few times .

    Here is a pic of that tri-max cafs system i was talking about



    It is in the first compartment there on the curb side of the rig (between the fron of the body and the curb side body door)

  7. #7
    Forum Member 33motor's Avatar
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    Our R unit is full of stuff... most anything you'll ever need.
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    http://www.sanantoniofire.org

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  8. #8
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    Everyone thinks they need a big, expensive, do everything rig and it has to have the word "HEAVY" on the side. I agree with the previous posts. Determine 1) What the rig will respond to 2) What equipment it will need to do those jobs 3) How big can your station and territory roads can handle 4) How much money do you have to spend on the rig and equipment if you don't have some or all of it 5) Secondary uses of the rig if space and money allow and 6) Your average staffing and levels of proficiency. Put all those in the blender and you'll have a concoction that should be able to answer what type of rig you need. In my volunteer department we carry 1) Holmatro extrication equipment with lots of cribbing 2) 9000W Light Tower 3) High pressure lifting bags 4) 2 Electric cord reels 5) 4-6000PSI Bottle cascade system 6) Air monitoring equipment 7) Salvage covers (Lots of them) 8) Roof Kit 9) Pike Poles 10) Stokes Basket 11) Ropes 12) Portable lighting 13) Air monitoring equipment 14) Scott SCBA 15) 30 spare SCBA cyclinders, etc. Ours is set up as a Vehicle Rescue / Fire Support unit to sum it up. We don't carry all the gee wizz haz mat stuff because the regional team is 30 minutes from us and another team is 15 minutes away from us. Both are staffed 24/7 and willing to work. As for Technical Rescue we also have a TR Co. within 30 minutes of us that is manned 24hrs a day is always wanting to work. Just some thoughts.

    Stay low and move it in.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

  9. #9
    Senior Member Dalmatian90's Avatar
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    4-6000psi bottles is good for 32-4500psi SCBAs, so run from there

    I agree with not going with the on-board compressor. Why fill bottles with smoke & diesel soot drifting around?

    Use a booster pump to boost the pressure from the big bottles as they fall behind 4500psi to fill the SCBAs.

  10. #10
    Forum Member tripperff's Avatar
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    Default here's how our's is laid out...

    Driver's Side: Compartment 1-Cribbing; pass through for backboards, stokes backet and 500w tripod lights; 2 500w quartz lights; 2 small electric cord reels; Circuit breaker box for PTO generator; numerous assorted adapters for electric cords; grounding rod for generator and sledge hammer.

    Compartment 2: Extrication tools- Combi-tool preconnected to portable gas pump, O-cutter preconnected hose reel system, Big spreader, medium and large rams, extra hoses; Hurst chains; assorted extrication hand tools; Step cribbing and wedges.

    Under body comparment driver's side: long cribbing.

    Compartment 3 (over wheel well): Spare air-pack and O2 cylinders; spare SCBA masks.

    Compartment 4: Assorted Hand tools; 2 or 3 marriages; tool box with mechanic's tools; Air tools; Air hose reel and regulator for using air tools off the Cascade system; 2 water cans; 20lb. dry chem; 20 lb. CO2; old Scott 2A frame converted to use with air tools; Air bags, hoses and controls; 2 5000 psi Cascade bottles; hay hooks; bolt cutters; cable cutters; 4 ton porta-power; 2-2 ton come-alongs; 2-4 ton come-alongs; 2 electric sawz-alls and 1 24v battery powered. sawz all.

    Officer's side: Compartment 5: Other side of Compartment 1 pass throughs, also same cord reels, adapters and quartz lights; 2-24" Electric PPV fans, 2-18" Electric PPV fans, hanger bars and hooks for fans.

    Under body compartment officer's side: warning signs.

    Compartment 6: 5000 watt portable generator; Stihl Rotary saw; Echo Quik-Vent saw :P; 10 ton porta-power; saw maintenance equipment; gas cans, mixed and straight gas; hip waders(2).

    Compartment 7 (over wheel well): Salvage and overhaul equipment and supplies-roofing paper, plastic sheeting, salvage covers, water vacuum, sump pump, utility knife, hammer and nails.

    Compartment 8: Long tools-shovels, hooks, extendable cribbing, brooms; Rope rescue equipment; 4 5000 psi Cascade bottles; "handy-man" jacks, bottle jacks and bumper jacks.

    Inside body: Driver's side: Medical equipment; Cascade fill station.

    Officer's side: 4 Ice/Cold water rescue suits and equipment; more medical equipment.

    Front of body area: Command area-Command board, accountability board, resource materials; Low Band, High Band and UHF radios; spare sawz all batteries and chargers; 9' pike pole and long vent fan hanger bar under bench seat.

    Cab Area: Officer's side: Water rescue throw bag; latex gloves; clip board; Knox Box; SCBA in seat bracket. Radio Control Heads; XLarge and Small SCBA masks, 2 each; Streamlight SL40 light and charger under the seat; high band portable.

    Rear Seating Area: 8 SCBA seats; 8 SL40 chargers and lights above front facing seats; SCBA masks hung on light heads; 5 High Band portables with SCBA.

    A few things I think we'd do different are to do away with the under body compartments. They have always leaked. When we frst got the truck we kept our air bags in one of them and the couplings got so rusty so fast that we had to wire brush them all the tme to keep them working. Another thing we might have done different is only 6 seats in the rear cab area. It get's pretty cozy with a full crew. I remember going to a fire once and most of the crew were pretty big guys. We actually had to take turns gettng dressed out and puttng on our SCBA. If we hadn't we'd have knocked each other out on the ride. I think we'd also go with 6000 psi cascade bottles.
    Last edited by tripperff; 11-24-2003 at 03:58 PM.
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  11. #11
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    here is a link to see our 1999 KME heavy rescue, think you will be pleased.

    www.mcfd.net/westend.html

    click on company web site for detailed pics of each compartment

    Lt. Matunis firemanmike131@yahoo.com

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    I agree with those that said make your rescue fit your needs

    Don't do a heavy rescue just to keep up with the department in the next town.

    We carry extrication equipment, rappelling equipment, chain saws, abrasive wheel saws, electric and gas fans, sawzall, life jackets & canoe paddles, air bags, a few air powered tools, several come alongs,
    pike poles, extra scbas. That's just some stuff off the top of my head. GPS, Digital cameras, CD radiation detector, CO meter

    We're going to get a rescue pumper, and everything on our current walk in fits in the boxs of the trucks we've tried.

    We'll get a rig with a 165-175" wheelbase, and will get in and out of any of our tight spots in town or out in the country.

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