Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 165
  1. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Campers Rescued by Airboat

    Campers Rescued by Airboat

    Record-setting rains flood rivers, roads

    By Marcella Fleming
    January 5, 2004

    The IndyStar
    The Associated Press contributed to this report
    In southern Indiana, creeks and rivers rose overnight, trapping at least two couples. Indiana State Police and Department of Natural Resources conservation officers used an airboat Sunday morning to rescue a couple who'd stopped to camp Saturday on the south side of Cyprus Lake in Jackson County.

    In Brown County, Conservation Officer Jason Lee was patrolling the hills when he saw a couple stranded on the porch of their mobile home near Bean Blossom Creek, waving and holding a sign that read, "We Need Help." Lee steered his boat to them and delivered the couple and their black-and-white terrier to higher ground, where a relative picked them up.

    Some overnight snow or rain could have added to wet conditions, but officials at the Indiana Department of Transportation and Indianapolis' Public Works Department did not expect a hazardous situation by this morning. A low of 28 degrees was expected overnight and flurries are likely today.

    Crews delivered about 1,250 sandbags to two flood-prone areas of Indianapolis: Ravenswood on the Northside and Far Northside, and Frog Hollow on the Southwestside, said Kelly Duncan, spokeswoman for the Department of Public Works.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM


  2. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Boating accident on Fox River

    http://www.dailyherald.com/search/ma...intid=3798945#

    Geneva Fire Dept. Responds Airboat to Boating Accident
    Man recovering after speedboat accident on Fox River

    By Gala M. Pierce
    Daily Herald Staff Writer

    January 3, 2004

    St. Charles, IL -- A Geneva man is in good condition Friday after a speedboat accident Thursday that left him with broken ribs and a broken wrist.

    Because of the nice weather, Kurt Graf, 41, of 127 N. First St., Geneva, took a cruise by himself in his Stoker Tunnel Vee single-engine boat along the Fox River, according to his father, Roger Graf, of Janesville, Wis.

    The steering linkage - or the column between the motor in the back of the boat to the steering in the front - malfunctioned, causing Graf to lose control. The boat then flipped over in an area adjacent to the 2800 block of Meadow Drive in St. Charles.

    "He was able to swim to shore with one arm," said Roger Graf, who drove in town with his wife, Mary, to check on his son. The Grafs are originally from Elgin.

    A nearby witness called 911 about 3 p.m. Graf made it to shore before paramedics arrived.

    A water rescue dive team responded to the accident, including four paramedics, three firefighters and two chief officers from the St. Charles Fire Department with assistance from Geneva.

    Paramedics treated Graf at the scene and took him to Delnor-Community Hospital in Geneva, where he remains, according to hospital officials.

    Personnel brought the high-performance speedboat to shore with the fire department's airboat. Graf's boat was damaged on the port, or driver's, side.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  3. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Man dies trying to save buddy

    http://www.denverpost.com/cda/articl...869288,00.html

    Neb. man dies trying to save hunting buddy

    Coloradan falls through ice on lake but survives

    Denver Post

    By Kirk Mitchell
    Denver Post Staff Writer

    Sunday, January 04, 2004 -

    A Nebraska man fell through the ice and died trying to rescue a Colorado hunting buddy during a New Year's Day goose-hunting trip.

    Art Stapleton, 54, of Aurora was walking across the ice on Enders Lake in southwestern Nebraska to retrieve a goose when he broke through the ice. His friend, Bill DeHart, 55, of nearby Wauneta had a heart attack during the rescue, DeHart's family members said Saturday.

    The grandsons of the two men flagged down a passer-by who tossed Stapleton a wood chisel that he used to pull himself onto the ice and to safety, Stapleton said in a phone interview Saturday from his Aurora home.

    "There were some angels there," he said. "It could have been a lot worse."

    Stapleton said he loved his friend, and it breaks his heart that DeHart died trying to save his life.

    "He is a hero in my mind," he said. "I wish he wouldn't have come out there."

    Stapleton's grandsons, Jonathan Stapleton, 14, and Sage Stapleton, 9, risked their lives by walking out onto the ice to save Stapleton. They also fell through the ice, said 11-year-old Seth DeHart, Bill DeHart's grandson, who called 911.

    The two men took their grandsons goose hunting New Year's morning. They had placed three decoys by the edge of the water and were waiting behind a camouflaged hunting net

    At about 10 a.m., Stapleton shot a goose, which landed on the ice. Seth DeHart walked out onto the ice to get the bird, he said.

    "The boys were the hunting dogs; they were the retrievers," said Traci DeHart, one of DeHart's four children.

    She said her father had talked about getting hunting dogs but hadn't yet done so.

    "I walked out about 6 feet and turned. I got scared," Seth DeHart said. "You could see the bottom of the lake (through the ice)."

    Stapleton then walked out onto the ice, but the bird, which was still alive, moved farther out from him, Stapleton said. He tried to reach it with his rifle and crashed through, he said.

    Stapleton said the ice broke several times when he pulled himself up to his chest.

    Stapleton's grandsons tried to go out to him, but when the 9-year-old fell through the ice, Jonathan helped him out of the water, Stapleton said.

    "I'm so proud of them," he said. "They kept their heads. Jonathan was yelling at me not to give up. I didn't want to drown in front of my grandkids."

    The boys called for help on a cellphone and yelled for assistance while DeHart crawled out onto the ice toward his friend. He stretched out while lying on the ice and just as their hands touched, DeHart plunged through the ice, Stapleton said.

    They were swimming next to each other and talking strategy one minute, and then DeHart disappeared into the water, Stapleton said.

    Family members say DeHart had a heart attack.

    Two other hunters who heard the boys screaming came to help, Stapleton said. While one went for a boat, the other tossed the chisel about 40 yards. It landed within Stapleton's reach.

    "It was amazing how close it landed," Stapleton said. "Another five minutes and I would have been gone."

    He said he was so weak he could barely hang on to the ice.

    DeHart's body was recovered by divers about five hours later, Stapleton said.

    Stapleton and DeHart met five years ago when DeHart, a plumber and electrician, worked on Stapleton's cabin in southwestern Nebraska, Stapleton said. They became close friends and had gone on a few dozen hunting and camping trips together, he said.

    Seth DeHart said his grandfather was a hero.

    "We all had a part in saving lives that day," he said. "My grandpa died doing the thing he loves to do best."
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  4. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Flood Victims Rescued by Airboat

    Record-setting rains flood rivers, roads

    By Marcella Fleming
    January 5, 2004

    The IndyStar
    The Associated Press contributed to this report

    In southern Indiana, creeks and rivers rose overnight, trapping at least two couples. Indiana State Police and Department of Natural Resources conservation officers used an airboat Sunday morning to rescue a couple who'd stopped to camp Saturday on the south side of Cyprus Lake in Jackson County.

    In Brown County, Conservation Officer Jason Lee was patrolling the hills when he saw a couple stranded on the porch of their mobile home near Bean Blossom Creek, waving and holding a sign that read, "We Need Help." Lee steered his airboat to them and delivered the couple and their black-and-white terrier to higher ground, where a relative picked them up.

    Some overnight snow or rain could have added to wet conditions, but officials at the Indiana Department of Transportation and Indianapolis' Public Works Department did not expect a hazardous situation by this morning. A low of 28 degrees was expected overnight and flurries are likely today.

    Crews delivered about 1,250 sandbags to two flood-prone areas of Indianapolis: Ravenswood on the Northside and Far Northside, and Frog Hollow on the Southwestside, said Kelly Duncan, spokeswoman for the Department of Public Works.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  5. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Four men rescued from ice-floe

    http://canadaeast.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...RIEF/301050020

    Times & Transcript | E-Brief
    January 5, 2004

    Four men safe after dramatic ice-floe rescue

    Smelt fishermen stranded in Bay of Chaleur after ice breaks off near Dalhousie

    YVON GAUVIN
    Times & Transcript Staff

    CAMPBELLTON - "I’m not going back until the bay is frozen," Philippe Boucher of Campbellton said yesterday after spending close to two hours adrift on an ice floe heading into Bay of Chaleur waters with three other stranded ice-fishing enthusiasts.

    Boucher and Gary Ratte had gone to the Pointe La Nim area a few kilometres west of Dalhousie on Saturday to fish smelts on a frozen cove when the ice they and two other men were on broke away from shore and began drifting towards open bay waters shortly after noon.

    The floe was enormous, said Boucher. He estimated the size of the frozen platform at 1,000 feet (300 metres) wide and a kilometre (two-thirds of a mile) long. The ice was 16 inches (40 centimetres) thick where they were fishing, he said. The ice broke away due to tidal action, although there were no big tides at the time, he added.

    It had happened before a number of years ago when several people ended up spending the night adrift in the gulf surrounded by frigid waters, said Boucher. That was one of the thoughts that passed through his mind while frantically searching for an escape plan.

    "I thought about dying," Boucher said.

    The two friends had been fishing from an ice shack they had brought along and were inside when the other two men, whose names were not available, approached them to say the ice had broken away at their end and they were looking for a way to cross onto the shoreline. By this time, the ice floe had separated several feet from the shore and was moving steadily away, he said.

    He briefly contemplated trying to jump/swim across but had to abandon the idea.

    Boucher said the four tried frantically to attract the attention of motorists driving near the shore and while some slowed down, only one stopped and rushed down the bank and shoreline where Boucher and others yelled for him to get help. The unidentified Good Samaritan then ran to a nearby house and called 911.

    That was about 12:30 p.m. and the four could do nothing more than wait for help. All the while, the ice floe was steadily moving away. Soon, a snowfall had all but obliterated the coastline, he said. There was panic in the air.

    They were afraid that the wind would pick up and waves would come along to break up their floating platform even more.

    "I knew we were in a big mess," he said. The two friends have been ice fishing for smelts for years without ever encountering any problem. It had even been a productive day, with 150 smelts landed.

    "I didn’t lose it, but it came close," said Boucher. "It’s a great day to be alive."

    Boucher said he intends to continue to ice-fish but this time it won’t be until the entire bay is frozen.

    Boucher thanked their unknown Good Samaritan and the Dalhousie and Campbellton firefighters who responded to the rescue call.

    The ice floe was a kilometre or more offshore and heading further into open waters towards the Gulf of St. Lawrence when the rescue operation was launched, said Campbellton RCMP Cpl. Carl Haché. The four were brought ashore at about 2 p.m.

    The Dalhousie Fire Department used its Zodiac boat for the rescue mission.

    The four were cold and frightened but none the worse for their experience, said Haché.

    Dalhousie Fire Chief Dave Adams said the stranded men were very fortunate the wind and water remained calm or else the task of rescuing them would have been much more difficult. Darkness was only a few hours away.

    "They would have been in bad shape," he said.

    The two fire departments managed to carry the 16-foot (4.8 metre) boat to the edge of the ice and into the water where three firefighters set out for the trapped people. Once there, one man used a tool to hook onto the ice floe and the others helped the trapped men into the boat for the trip back.

    The most difficult part was getting the boat and outboard motor out of the water and up onto the icy bank to the waiting emergency vehicles, Adams said.

    People shouldn’t venture onto that ice until it can thicken more and the cove freezes up completely, he said.

    The shack was discovered yesterday beached further along the shoreline
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  6. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default 3 Snowmobiles, 2 ATVs fall thru ice

    http://www.journaltimes.com/articles...iq_2638005.txt

    Ice is thin on local lakes

    By Journal Times staff
    January 10, 2004

    Racine County, WI -- A number of outdoors people have learned the hard way that the ice on Racine County lakes is thin. On Friday night, three snowmobiles fell through the ice on Eagle Lake. On Saturday two ATVs fell through the ice.

    "We haven't had a cold enough winter to make the lakes freeze over," said Sgt. Jim Stratman of the Racine County Sheriff's Department.

    There were no injuries, he said. People have been using their machines to go out fishing on lakes; they leave the machines, which fall into the lake.

    Today's weather forecast won't help snowmobilers wanting to ride on the lakes. Today's high is projected to be near 35, and there's a 30 percent chance for rain or snow in the afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  7. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Icy water rescue

    http://www.marionstar.com/news/stori...ws/190178.html

    Icy water rescue

    By JILLIAN DALEY
    The Marion Star

    PROSPECT -- A local woman's attempt to arrive at work on time took a dangerous turn when the car carrying her and her young child became stuck in icy water.

    Tauren Temple, 24, who is pregnant, disregarded the warning signs posted on a Prospect Township road and couldn't maneuver through a flooded portion of Prospect-Upper Sandusky Road just north of Ohio 4.

    Temple, of 3019 Ruth Road, was driving south with her son, Chad, who will be 2 in March, at about 9:45 a.m. Wednesday. The road, which runs parallel to the Scioto River, is marked with high-water signs and closed-road barricades on the north and south ends.

    Temple was late for work, so after passing the barricade she attempted to go through the water that had collected on Prospect-Upper Sandusky Road, said Trooper Jala C. O'Dowd of the Ohio State Highway Patrol Marion Post, who was on the scene at 9:54 a.m.

    "She thought she could make it through, got stuck in the ice and then backed off the right side of the road into a ditch," O'Dowd said.

    Authorities freed Temple and her child from the vehicle within a few minutes. She was wearing a seat belt and her son was buckled into a child restraint seat in the mauve, four-door, 1999 Ford Taurus.

    The air bag was not deployed. She and her son were transported to Marion General Hospital for possible injuries and were released. Water damaged the interior and engine, and the vehicle is insured, said O'Dowd.

    Temple called her mother and 9-1-1 on her cell phone at about 9:47 a.m. An emergency medical service unit from Battle Run Fire Department provided transport to the hospital. Jack Kirby from Kirby Auto Parts of Richwood towed the vehicle from the water.

    It was the second incident reported in the area involving a motorist stranded in water caused by flooding from the weekend's heavy rains.

    Early Tuesday, a woman and her teenage son were commuting to Delaware when they missed the high-water signs due to the darkness.

    Their car stalled in 2 feet of water pooled on Espyville Road west of Marion, and they needed to be rescued by Marion County Sheriff's deputies. They were not injured.

    "Driving around a barricade into icy water can cause your vehicle to stall; you can be stranded," said Chief Deputy Tim Bailey of the sheriff's office.

    "It can be very difficult for us to get to you. It can be very dangerous in terms of exposure to your body - I'm talking about hypothermia (a condition in which the body temperature drops below normal).

    "Drive with care. Honor the barricades. Take a little more time to get to your destination."

    Sheriff's deputies controlled traffic at the incident, and a county official echoed the sentiment promoting safety made by Bailey.

    "Why would you put yourself in harm's way?" said Dave Kearns, highway superintendent of the Marion County Engineers Department.

    Reporter Jillian Daley: 740-375-5152 or
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  8. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Snowmobile plunges through ice

    http://www.capitalnews9.com/content/...54706&SecID=33

    Snowmobile plunges through ice

    1/9/2004
    Ryan Peterson

    Pittsfield, NY -- A local man is alive today because of his friends' quick thinking.
    "If it wasn't for them, I absolutely wouldn't be here today."

    That's 27-year-old Joe Potash recalling the actions of three friends who were able to pluck him out of the frigid water of Onota Lake Thursday night, after he tried to speed over a section of thin ice.

    Potash said, "We expected to go fast across it, made the mistake of slowing down a little bit and the ice broke through, sunk straight down."

    According to Fire Department officials, Potash owes his life to the quick actions of his three friends.

    Deputy Chief Keith Phillips said, "After about 10 minutes, 15 minutes tops, you're just so cold that you're unable to help yourself anymore. Self rescue is not an option. Without someone there to help you, you're in big trouble."

    Potash said, "Nelson Orsini, Chris Flood and Bob Herforth. Chris went to get help and called 911. Nelson and Bob stayed right on the edge of the ice, with me the whole time, cheering me on. They're the two that dragged me out of the water and got me to the ambulance."

    Joe was very lucky. Because of the quick thinking of his three friends, they got him to shore to the waiting ambulance at the Controy Pavilion on the shores of Onota Lake. They got him to the hospital where they warmed him up and gave him a clean bill of health. But Joe, along with the Pittsfield Fire Department, is warning everybody: Because of the cold weather, don't think everything is completely frozen over just yet.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  9. #49
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Truck plunges through ice

    http://www.millelacsmessenger.com/MI...06&PubID=15006

    PICKUP PULLED OUT OF LAKE

    Crow Wing County, MN -- On Dec. 27 a lightweight Ford Ranger broke through four inches of Mille Lacs Lake ice and sank 18 feet. The driver of the truck was Jim Neshiem of Corcoran. He had a trailer parked at Castaways Resort on the northeast side of the lake. Staricha was called to pull the truck out.

    Staricha said he understood the driver did have a resort road pass but wasn’t paying attention when he drove onto thin ice. Luckily there were no injuries.

    On Dec. 30, Staricha was able to pull the 3,600-pound vehicle to the surface. The task took two underwater divers, including Staricha, and three other men to assist with the tow. After six hours of work, the vehicle was removed from the lake.

    Staricha said divers are needed to swim down into the icy water to hook up chains and pulleys to sunken vehicles. “First, I dive into the cold water and then I get out and work up a sweat and then go back in the water. It’s not easy,” he said.

    COSTS FOR SINKING
    The cost of towing and repairing a vehicle that’s taken a plunge may be covered by one’s insurance. Karen Tramm of Lakeside Insurance in Isle said, “How much is paid by the insurance company depends on the policy and any deductible, of course.”

    Tim Lightner of West Brainerd Auto Service, an authorized AAA service station, said the cost of towing a vehicle out of a lake is not covered by AAA’s roadside assistance program.

    The fee charged by Staricha to pull a vehicle out varies. To pull the Ford Ranger out, Staricha charged the owner $1,800. He said he retrieved a snowmobile a few days earlier for $200. But Staricha has had to charge as much as $3,500 to recover a sunken vehicle.

    “It all depends on the job — how deep the water is, how many people I have to pay to help, divers. All that changes each time,” he said.

    Issue date: January 7, 2004. ©Mille Lacs Messenger Inc.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  10. #50
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Man fished out of lake survives

    http://www.gmtoday.com/news/local_st...1082004_03.asp


    Friend fishes man out
    of lake

    By BRIAN HUBER - GM Today Staff
    January 8, 2004


    WAUKESHA, WI - A Mukwonago man showed up to retrieve his snowmobile just as a dive team was preparing to enter Eagle Spring Lake to search a site where snowmobile tracks led to a hole in the ice Wednesday.

    Emergency personnel said they feared someone my have fallen into the open water on Eagle Springs Lake on Wednesday. It was later discovered that someone had fallen in, but a companion pulled him from the lake.

    Jeffrey Pergowski and his friend, Jeffrey Conn, of the town of Eagle, arrived on the scene as investigators were preparing to search the icy lake for signs of someone who apparently fell through the ice early Wednesday morning, said Sheriff’s Department Detective Steve Pederson. The men apparently returned to retrieve the sunken snowmobile.

    The Waukesha County Sheriff’s Department was called to investigate the scene after someone walking on the lake reported seeing a helmet and gloves on the lake, about 30 yards away from where snowmobile tracks led to a hole in the ice, Pederson said. He added that a lake resident reported snowmobile activity on the lake at around 3 a.m. which stopped suddenly.

    Pederson said there were no reports of someone missing or of someone seeing anyone fall through the ice. A dive team was preparing to enter the lake and a hovercraft was en route from City of Pewaukee to assist in the search when the case was solved.

    Pederson said it appeared that Pergowski fell through the ice and Conn took off his hat and gloves to bail his friend out of about six feet of water. They then went to Conn’s.

    "What they didn’t do was call anybody and tell someone this had happened," Pederson said.

    Repeated attempts to reach Pergowski Wednesday were unsuccessful. Conn’s number was unlisted.

    Pederson said people should call the authorities to report any incident on ice, so that similar false alarms can be avoided in the future. He added that anyone going out on ice over spring-fed lakes like Eagle Spring Lake should be aware that the lakes are spring-fed and there may be spots where the ice is very thin or none exists at all.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  11. #51
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Man falls through river ice

    http://www.journaltimes.com/articles...iq_2629692.prt

    Dog's barking attracts rescuers to man in river

    By Jeff Wilford
    January 7, 2004

    CALEDONIA, WI - Wolf Korndoerfer was walking his dog, Duke, shortly after 8 o'clock Tuesday morning, as is his habit. He was walking Duke on the ice of the frozen Root River, as he had done before.
    In hindsight, it wasn't such a good idea.

    The ice suddenly gave away beneath him and Korndoerfer, 3315 Patzke Lane, Caledonia, fell into the frigid water on a bitterly cold morning. Unable to touch the bottom, and unable to pull himself out because the ice kept breaking under his weight, Korndoerfer spent what he guessed was 15 minutes in the water before Racine firefighters arrived and pulled him to safety.

    Everyone agrees Korndoerfer is lucky to be alive.

    "I wouldn't expect somebody to last much more than 15 or 20 minutes, this time of year in freezing weather," said Dr. Jeffrey Manlove. Manlove, an emergency doctor at St. Luke's Hospital, did not treat

    Korndoerfer.

    "He's very lucky," said Battalion Chief Richard Moriarity, of the Racine Fire Department. "The dog saved his life,

    actually."

    When Korndoerfer fell in the water, Duke went "bananas," Korndoerfer said. The dog ran circles around him and barked incessantly, drawing the attention of neighbors along the Root River, at least one of whom called 911.

    Korndoerfer fell through ice near the 4100 block of Mona Park Road. Firefighters received the rescue call at 8:14 a.m.

    Korndoerfer was taken to St. Mary's Medical Center, where he was treated for hypothermia and sent home.

    Korndoerfer, who owned Korndoerfer Construction before he retired, said he figured the ice was safe because temperatures had been so cold the last couple of days. Korndoerfer said he should have known better.

    "It was kind of stupid of me," he said. "Today, I thought `Gee, it certainly ought to be safe by now.' And I was wrong."

    Korndoerfer said he stopped trying to pull himself up once he knew someone had called 911 and conserved his energy.

    Ironically, Korndoerfer said, he had imagined something like this happening. But he figured because the river is generally shallow, he would be able to use the bottom to help push himself out. He had the even worse luck of falling into the water over a channel, where the river was too deep to touch bottom.

    As for Duke ...

    Korndoerfer said his 9-month-old yellow Lab is a an aggressive, hyper dog. "His barking used to drive me crazy. We tried break him of it," Korndoerfer said. "But fortunately, we didn't."

    And Korndoerfer's accident won't interfere with his regular morning walks with Duke. He plans to be walking the dog again this morning.

    "You bet," Korndoerfer said, though assuring: "Not on the river."
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  12. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Woman falls through ice

    http://www.thechronicle.com/story_di...ory=Local+News

    Woman OK after falling through ice

    Sean O'Leary - Chronicle Staff Writer
    January 7, 2004

    HEBRON, CT — The woman who fell through the ice Sunday at Gay City State Park wants the public to know she was not “that crazy lady running on the ice”.

    Elissa Edson, 47, of Manchester, was pulled from the partly frozen pond at the park after trying to save her two golden retrievers, Hunter and Gordon.

    “I had just finished a three-mile, cross country run with my dogs, which I always do,” said Edson. “They saw some dogs about 50 feet away and I gave them permission to go play.

    “When they came back to me, they took the shortest distance, which took them over the ice.”

    The thin ice below the first dog that came toward Edson gave way and the dog became submerged, she said.

    “The first dog fell in and then the second dog went in to rescue him, thankfully I was able to keep the third one, Indie, from going in,” said Edson. “I knew that the situation was serious and started plotting my strategy.”

    Edson said she began to lay out tree limbs and branches in an effort to get closer to the dogs.

    “I got within five feet and I started to realize the dogs might be giving up,” said Edson. “So I started giving them commands so that they wouldn’t. I wasn’t even concerned about myself by the time the rescue team came.”

    The rescue team did indeed come to pull Edson and the two dogs from the pond.

    “I had severe hypothermia so I probably wasn’t thinking straight, but I didn’t want to go when they came,” said Edson. “My heart just sunk because I thought I was leaving them.”

    All three, however, were saved and are doing well. Edson was taken to Manchester Hospital where she was released Sunday afternoon.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  13. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Firefighters practice ice rescues

    http://www.dailynewstribune.com/news...es01082004.htm

    Firefighters practice ice rescues

    By Melissa Beecher / Tribune Staff Writer
    January 8, 2004

    WALTHAM, MA -- As the mercury dipped yesterday, so too did several Waltham firefighters -- into the icy waters of the Charles River.
    Practicing mock ice rescues on the frozen portions of the river along Forest Grove Street, members of the department continued their annual week-long training session.

    Diving into the 40-degree water, two firefighters in red diving suits played the role of victims as other members of the department attempted to "save" them.

    "Every year around this time, when there is the potential for people falling through the ice, we run ice rescue drills as a refresher course for the firefighters," said Lt. Ronald Belida.

    With temperatures dipping into the teens yesterday, firefighters were at the training site for nearly an hour.

    Wearing waterproof suits, two men floated in the water as the rescuers used ropes, boats and sleds to maneuver themselves over the thin ice for a well-choreographed rescue.

    "When you get out to a person that has been submerged in the water for a 10- to 15-minute period, they have virtually no mobility," said Capt. Cliff Richardson yesterday at the training site. "We are basically dragging up dead weight."

    Firefighters said although no one has fallen through ice patches in the city in recent memory, they need to be prepared for such an emergency is important.

    "There are always people that go out ice fishing or ice skating on ice that is not completely solid," said Belida. "For those people, we really have to be prepared in case we're needed."

    Every member of the Waltham Fire Department will be trained. Fire officials said working in shifts, every man will be reacquainted with the ice rescue protocol.

    Fire officials said despite the preparation, residents should err on the side of caution during the winter months.

    "We tell residents that although it's going to be cold in the next couple of days, natural bodies of water will not necessarily be frozen solid," said Belida. "If people want to ice skate, they should really use a skating rink to prevent possible problems."
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  14. #54
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Winter Water Rescue Training

    http://www.ksfy.com/Global/story.asp...2&nav=0w0jK6qv

    Winter Water Rescue Training
    January 11, 2004

    Sioux Falls, SD --The temperatures are cold and in most areas, the ice is thick. It's good news for ice fishermen and other people who enjoy activities out on the ice, and it's also good news for Sioux Falls Fire Rescue.

    Training for an ice rescue is no laughing matter. It's something Fire Rescue crews take seriously every year. Todd Lowe explains their dedication to working in freezing cold waters, "It keeps us proficient and it enables us to rescue individuals in a timely, safe manner." The temperature of the water they practiced in on Friday was about 38-degrees. Crews were well equipped to handle the extreme conditions, but caution that the average person out for a day of ice fishing will not be so well prepared.

    Captain Jay Titus recommends the best thing to keep in mind if you find yourself trapped in frigid water: the more you panic and move around, the quicker hypothermia will set in and "If you do a total submersion, it doesn't take long to lose motor function" and you won't be able to rescue yourself.

    Rescuers hope the skills they practice will never be needed in real life. Todd Lowe points out that's where you come in, by "Knowing the lay of the lake and what makes weak spots - springs, shallow water or water traveling over points. Also, with the fluctuation of temperatures, it does create areas that are weak." It's also a good idea to carry ice awls with you. Should you end up in the water, it will be slippery and difficult to pull yourself up onto the ledge. Ice awls will help you.

    Rescue crews also recommend a whistle to signal someone to your aid in an emergency. But, Captain Jay believes the best advice of all is "If you're going out on the ice, always go with a partner. That way, if you get into trouble, someone will be there to get help." They also advise using your own judgement if you see someone fall into the water. If you can throw something to them or reach them from the shore, then go ahead and try to help. But, if helping means putting yourself in danger, call for help and wait for crews to arrive. They don't want to have to pull more than one person out of the water.

    By: Shannon Stevens
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  15. #55
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Horse saved from icy death

    http://www.decaturdailydemocrat.com/...ews/news02.txt

    Geneva FD saves horse which fell through ice

    Friday, January 9, 2004

    Geneva, IN -- A full-grown horse that fell through ice and became trapped in water as high as its back was rescued, about a mile east of Geneva, by teamwork from Amish residents and members of the Geneva Fire Department early Thursday afternoon.

    Curt Chaffins, a veteran Geneva firefighter, told the Daily Democrat that the horse is two or three years old and did not appear injured after the ordeal, but was shaking from being in the cold water for an undetermined time.

    Chaffins says no one knows how long the horse was in the water before someone driving by on what used to be State Rd. 116 saw the animal and reported its predicament.

    Geneva police were sent to the scene and quickly called for firefighters to assist.

    Once the department arrived, said Chaffins, members of the Amish community entered the frigid water and hooked a strap around the horse's torso, then a winch on a fire truck pulled the animal to safety on land.

    The rescue operation took 20 to 25 minutes once the department arrived at the scene, it was estimated by Chaffins..
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  16. #56
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Firefighters Rescue Sitting Ducks

    Firefighters Rescue Sitting Ducks

    Scott Schwebke

    January 7, 2004

    MONTROSE,CO - Fifteen fowls belonging to Wayne and Peg King literally became sitting ducks when they were attacked by dogs Monday night at the Riverbend RV Park near Montrose.

    Nine ducks were killed while six more that were injured were rescued Tuesday morning by Montrose Fire Protection District personnel from a frozen pond at the park on Old Chipeta Trail. Four other ducks were unharmed.

    The 15 ducks were attacked by a pair of dogs spotted roaming through the park, said Peg King, who co-owns Riverbend with her husband.

    Riverbend employees discovered the dead or injured ducks on or near the pond when they went to feed them around 8:30 a.m. Tuesday.

    Peg King expected only one of the rescued ducks to survive and hopes the dogs' owners can be located so they can pay restitution.

    "I feel badly for the animals injured, but I feel sadder for the people who own dogs and don't take care of them," she said, adding a report has been filed with the Montrose County Sheriff's Office.

    MFPD personnel arrived at Riverbend shortly after 10:30 a.m. Tuesday to rescue the surviving ducks.

    Two firefighters, who wore ice rescue suits and secured themselves with ropes, made their way across the frozen pond and retrieved the ducks.

    "The ice was thick enough that they didn't break through," said MFPD Battalion Chief Allen Weese.

    Peg King praised the firefighters for their efforts to save the ducks.

    "They are wonderful fellows and go far beyond the call of duty," she said. "Montrose should be grateful to have such a responsible and caring bunch of firefighters."

    MFPD personnel have been certified to perform ice rescues since the early 1990s but have never had to save a human, said Weese. However, they have been called to rescue various animals, including horses, dogs and deer.

    "We are willing to do it, as long as we are not putting a firefighter in danger," said Weese, regarding animal rescues.

    Contact Scott Schwebke via e-mail
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  17. #57
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Animal rescue not worth human risk

    Sunday, January 11, 2004

    Officials say rescue efforts are too dangerous and often futile

    Michael A. Sawyers
    Times-News Staffwriter

    CUMBERLAND, MA — Neither the Cumberland Fire Department nor the Maryland Department of Natural Resources considers it an emergency if a deer wanders into the Wills Creek flood control project, and neither agency will attempt to remove the animal.

    The dangers to rescuers of wildlife are real. A few years ago a DNR employee in Garrett County died after falling onto and through a lake’s ice cover as he attempted to reach a loon that appeared to be stuck.

    “The risk to humans and even the risk to the animal is not worth it,” said Rande Brown of the Maryland Wildlife and Heritage Service. “The only reasons to ever handle a wild animal are if public safety is threatened or if it is in the best interest of the animal. Neither of those apply to a deer in the flood control project.”

    Brown said about once a year his office gets the deer-in-the-flood-control call.

    The Cumberland Fire Department gets similar calls, according to Chief William Herbaugh.

    “The people want us to get the deer out. Sometimes the people themselves try to get the deer out,” he said. “That’s usually a fiasco. They see an animal flailing and believe that we have to do something. People see it as an emergency. We don’t.”

    The water in the flood control can go from inches to feet overnight, Brown said. “That alone creates a dangerous situation. Besides, when a deer sees a human coming close it doesn’t know the human is trying to help. It’s either going to try to get away or fight.”

    Brown said that a robust deer in the flood control can easily walk or swim to the mouth of Wills Creek where it can leave the area along the Potomac River.

    “Most deer that are in the flood control are already hurt in some way,” he said, adding that, with one exception, all deer rescued from the project eventually died, often hours later, from the stress of the effort.

    “It is quite possible that a deer in the flood control project could die there,” Brown said. “We don’t rehabilitate deer. It doesn’t make sense to put that kind of effort into one deer when you consider how many deer are in Allegany County. Almost 10,000 of them die in a year from hunting and being struck by automobiles.”

    “If a deer gets in the flood control and a bunch of people are standing around watching it, we’re probably going to ask the crowd to disperse,” Herbaugh said. “If someone actually enters the flood control to try to rescue the deer, there is the possibility they would be prosecuted for trespass.”
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  18. #58
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Man becomes victim in attempt to rescue dog

    http://bim.printthis.clickability.co...artnerID=21357

    Water Rescue
    Man becomes victim in attempt to rescue dog

    KAKE News
    January 11, 2004

    Wichita, KA -- A man tries to rescue his dog out of icy water, but he soon needed to be rescued himself. It happened just outside of Council Grove Thursday afternoon.

    Henry Wessel and his neighbor John Hanson have only spoken a couple times, but there is a deep bond between them.

    On Thursday, John’s dog Checkers ran out onto an ice-covered lake while chasing geese. The dog fell through the ice into the water. John dove in to help. He was trapped in the icy water for 25 minutes. It was all he could do to hang onto a buoy and keep his head above water.

    Henry just happened to look out his window and see John struggling in the water. He grabbed his wife Bea and ran out to see what he could do. The 73-year-old tried to throw a rope out to John but it wouldn't reach. He climbed in his canoe, scooted it onto the ice and threw the rope again. This time, John caught it.

    If John had been in the water just a few more minutes, it could have been too late. He was taken to the hospital for observation. They released him the next day.

    As for the dog, she also made it out thanks to Henry. He went back in a second time to save her too.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  19. #59
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Girls fall through ice

    http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southt...t/112seyt4.htm

    Girls fall through ice

    Daily Southtown
    Sunday, January 11, 2004

    PALOS HILLS , IL -- Two 15-year-old girls fell through the ice at Bullfrog Lake in Palos Hills on Saturday afternoon, though neither were hurt, fire officials said.

    The girls were sledding near the lake when they slid about 15 feet onto the ice, said Battalion Chief Rocky Carlson of the North Palos Fire Protection District.

    A passer-by helped pull the girls from the waist-deep water. A witness' initial call to police prompted fire officials to call for backup from the Palos Heights Fire Department's rescue squad.

    The squad was told to turn back before reaching the lake, fire officials said.

    The girls were treated on the scene by paramedics and didn't need to be hospitalized, Carlson said.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

  20. #60
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    384

    Default Men lucky to be alive, surviving sub-zero temps

    http://www.wtvw.com/global/story.asp...Type=Printable

    Rescued man and friend lucky to be alive

    January 10, 2004
    Reporter: Casey Stegall

    Evansville, IN -- It is hard for many of us to imagine surviving sub-zero weather overnight.

    Yet, we've seen it twice now this week---people living to tell their amazing stories. "It was very scary and very cold," said Steven Soell, 39. Soell admits he never feared for his own life, but thought he'd never see his buddy, Kenny Collins, again.

    "I heard him screaming, and then I called out to him," Soell said, "and that's the last I heard from him."

    Soell claims aside from the water being ice cold, the current was swift and too much to handle.

    "I weigh 210 pounds, and that water was throwing me around like a rag doll," he said.

    Because of those unpredictable waters, Soell tried convincing his friend to not battle the current. But Soell claims his friend didn't listen. "He told me to just keep going," Soell said, "but I turned around and walked the other way. A short time later I tried to find him, and he was gone."

    With trash bags wrapped around his feet, not a person in sight, and his friend now missing---Soell had a plan.

    "I thought I should make a fire with tires to create a lot of smoke," he said. Hours later, a duck hunter answered Soell's smoke signal call for help, and his prayers were answered.

    "I consider myself kind of lucky," Soell said, "but I consider my friend very lucky." Soell was treated and released from Deaconess Hospital. Collins, 40, was treated for hypothermia and shock at St. Mary's Hospital. He was released Saturday morning.
    "He who saves a single life, is said to have saved the entire world." TM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts