1. #1
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    Exclamation Required equipment on a pumper

    Does any one have a list of the required equipment that must be carried on a pumper (nozzles, hose, SCBA, etc)? I'm looking for the list from both NFPA and ISO to do a comparison. Send lists or web site links if ou have them. Thanks

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    Im also intrested in a list . Our new pumper is half empty and the captain and chief say that all the required equipment is on there .

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    Asst. Chief Bill

    International Order of the Fraternal Brotherhood of the Club

    Somewhere in or near north central Creek County, Oklahoma

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    I have not checked this to see if it's accurate or not so take it for what it's worth.



    -----------------------------------------

    Pumper Equipment List
    The following equipment shall be carried on pumper apparatus. Brackets or compartments are to be utilized as are necessary to mount or store the equipment.

    Ground Ladders.

    All ground ladders carried on the apparatus shall meet the requirements of NFPA 1931, Standard on Design of and Design Verification Tests for Fire Department Ground Ladders. At a minimum, the following ladders shall be carried on th apparatus:

    One straight ladder equipped with roof hooks

    One extension ladder

    One attic ladder


    Suction Hose.

    A minimum of 15 ft (4.6 m) of soft suction hose or 20 ft (6 m) of hard suction hose shall be carried. Suction hose shall meet the requirements of NFPA 1961, Standard on Fire Hose. The purchaser shall specify whether hard or soft suction hose is to be provided, the length and size of the hose, the size of the couplings, the manner in which the suction hose is to be carried on the apparatus, and the style of brackets desired.

    Where hard suction hose is provided, a suction strainer shall be furnished.


    Where soft suction hose is provided, it shall have long-handle female couplings with the local hydrant outlet connection on one end and the pump intake connection on the other end.

    Minor Equipment.


    The equipment listed below shall be available on the pumper fire apparatus before the apparatus is placed in service. Brackets or compartments shall be furnished so as to organize and protect the equipment.

    Fire Hose and Nozzles.

    The following fire hose and nozzles shall be carried on the apparatus:

    800 ft (244 m) of 2 1/2-in. (65-mm) or larger fire hose

    400 ft (122 m) of 1 1/2-in. (38-mm), 13/4-in. (44-mm), or 2-in. (51-mm) fire hose

    One combination spray nozzle, 200 gpm (757 L/min) minimum

    Two combination spray nozzles, 95 gpm (360 L/min) minimum

    One playpipe, with shutoff and 1-in. (25-mm), 1 1/8-in. (29-mm), and 1 1/4-in. (32-mm) tips


    Miscellaneous Equipment.

    The following additional equipment shall be carried on the apparatus:

    One 6-lb (2.7-kg) flathead axe mounted in a bracket fastened to the apparatus

    One 6-lb (2.7-kg) pickhead axe mounted in a bracket fastened to the apparatus

    One 6-ft (2-m) pike pole or plaster hook mounted in a bracket fastened to the apparatus

    One 8-ft (2.4-m) or longer pike pole mounted in a bracket fastened to the apparatus

    Two portable hand lights mounted in brackets fastened to the apparatus

    One approved dry chemical portable fire extinguisher with a minimum 80-B:C rating mounted in abracket fastened to the apparatus

    One 2 1/2-gal (9.5-L) or larger water extinguisher mounted in a bracket fastened to the apparatus

    One gated swivel intake connection with pump intake threads on one end and one or more female connections compatible with the supply hose carried on the other

    One self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) complying with NFPA 1981, Standard on Open-Circuit Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus for the Fire Service, for each assigned seating position, but not less than four, mounted in brackets fastened to the apparatus or stored in containers supplied by the SCBA manufacturer

    One spare SCBA cylinder for each SCBA carried, each mounted in a bracket fastened to the apparatus or stored in a specially designed storage space

    One first aid kit

    Four combination spanner wrenches mounted in brackets fastened to the apparatus

    Two hydrant wrenches mounted in brackets fastened to the apparatus

    Two double female adapters, sized to fit 2 1/2-in. (65-mm) or larger fire hose, mounted in brackets fastened to the apparatus

    Two double male adapters, sized to fit 2 1/2-in. (65-mm) or larger fire hose, mounted in brackets fastened to the apparatus

    One rubber mallet, suitable for use on suction hose connections, mounted in a bracket fastened to the apparatus

    Two salvage covers each a minimum size of 12 ft 14 ft (3.7 m 4.3 m)

    Two wheel chocks, mounted in readily accessible locations, that meet or exceed the requirements of SAE J348, Standard for Wheel Chocks, for the wheel diameter on which the chocks are to be used

    If the pumper is equipped with an aerial device, two additional wheel chocks, mounted in readily accessible locations, that meet or exceed the requirements of SAE J348, Standard for Wheel Chocks, for the wheel diameter on which the chocks are to be used shall be provided.

    If the pumper is equipped with an aerial device with a permanently mounted ladder, four ladder belts or ladder/escape belts meeting the requirements of NFPA 1983, Standard on Fire Service Life Safety Rope and System Components, shall be provided.

    Additional Recommended Equipment

    The following list of additional equipment is recommended to be carried on pumper fire apparatus.

    One fire service claw tool

    One smoke ejector, 5000 ft3/min (142 m3/min) minimum capacity. If electrically driven, a suitable adapter cord should be supplied to fit standard house "U" ground outlets and extension cords and outlets on generators used in fire departments

    One crowbar [36 in. (1 m) minimum] with brackets

    One pair of insulated bolt cutters with 7/16-in. (11-mm) minimum cut

    One Halligan-type tool with brackets

    One 21/2-in. (65-mm) hydrant valve (screw-type gate)

    One double-gated reducing leader wye, sized to fit hose used in department

    Two shovels (one pointed and one scoop)

    Four hose straps

    One 125-ft (38-m) length of utility rope having a breaking strength of at least 5000 lb (2268 kg)

    One 3000-W (minimum) portable generator

    Two 500-W portable lights

    Two cord reels with minimum 200-ft (61-m) cord on each with connectors that are compatible with lights, generator, and smoke ejector

    One portable pump

    Toolbox with hammers, wrenches, screwdrivers, and other assorted tools

    Master stream appliance, 1000 gpm (3785 L/min) minimum

    Foam delivery equipment compatible with onboard foam system

    One hose clamp
    -------------------------------------

    Hope it can be of some use.
    http://www.sanantoniofire.org

    IACOJ
    Got Crust?

    We lucky few, ... we band of brothers

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    Hmm so they were right We do have all the required stuff on the truck .

    Oh well having more space is better than not having enough

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    For ISO requirements go to www.isomitigation.com .

    Click on the PPC link and check your frequently asked questions for info on equipment. Do not forget to check the equalivency allowances. You may be carrying equipment that is not required on the pumper but you could get points for it if it is required on a truck or service company.

    Also note that the hose requirements are minimum in length and size.

    For instance we carry 700' of 4" and 600' of 2.5" which exceed the ISO requirement. The same holds true for attack lines. If you are using 1.75" instead of 1.5", it meets the requirement.

    Stay Safe
    IACOJ
    Last edited by Rayr49; 11-17-2003 at 05:35 PM.

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    Default Proper storage of Hard Suction

    Does anyoneone have reference to support the theory that hard suction hose should be mounted with the male threads to the rear of the apparatus in order to keep road dust/dirt out of the gaskets?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rdunn68 View Post
    Does anyoneone have reference to support the theory that hard suction hose should be mounted with the male threads to the rear of the apparatus in order to keep road dust/dirt out of the gaskets?
    I have never heard this before. Doesn't mean that it wasn't perhaps, at one time, someone's thought process, but in my humble opinion I believe it has more to do with point of use for it. If the pump is midship and you need to draft it makes more sense to have the end facing the pump that you will be connecting to the pump. I honestly believe that is more the reason for the male coupling to be facing the rear than dust in the gaskets.

    If anyone else knows differently please say so I want to hear more on this.

    FyredUp

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    Funny, where I live, hard or soft suction lines are not carried by any piece of equipment.

    I have a question though, what are hose straps and how are they used, and is a smoke ejector the same as a ventilation fan?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rmiller818 View Post
    Funny, where I live, hard or soft suction lines are not carried by any piece of equipment.
    How do you get the water into the truck? Do you use standard LDH between the hydrant and the pump?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rmiller818 View Post
    Funny, where I live, hard or soft suction lines are not carried by any piece of equipment.

    I have a question though, what are hose straps and how are they used, and is a smoke ejector the same as a ventilation fan?
    Miller, are you sure about that? How do you draft (with no hard suction) or get water from the hydrant (with no soft suction)?

    A smoke ejector is generally electrically powered and used to negatively pressure a room or building. It's used to "suck" the smoke out, whereas the ventilation fan (generally gas powered, but electric ones are becoming more popular) is placed outside, and it's greater CFM flow will push fresh air into the room/building, therefore displacing the smoke to the outside.

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    Rmiller,

    Are you refering to the old "Hard" suction hose or the "new flexible" suction hose, or do you mean LDH.

    Next we have two different type of hose straps.

    The first is the type that you wrap around hose to help you control/hold the hose(generally used by the backup man). http://www.edarley.com/catalog.cfm?d...ory&linkid=366

    The second type is what we wrap around the 2.5", 3", and 5" hose coming of the rear (mainly so we can grab the hose/ hose strap from standing on the ground.
    http://www.thefirestore.com/store/pr...er_hose_strap/

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    Thanks for the explination.

    Where I live, none of the units carry hard suction lines, none, they do not draft from a pond etc. There are plenty of hydrants everywhere for the most part. Usually, the 1st in engine starts the attack while the 2nd engine lays a line or two, these are 3" usually. The 2nd engine is hooked directly to a hydrant and pumps to the 1st engine. Some engines are starting to carry LDH, and they will sometimes lay in and not use a 2nd engine to pump off the hydrant.

    Now perhaps I have misunderstood the definition of a soft suction?

    Thanks everyone

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    Thumbs up

    North Carolina OFSM has some good stuff on their website if you take the time to find it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rmiller818 View Post
    Thanks for the explination.

    Now perhaps I have misunderstood the definition of a soft suction?

    Thanks everyone
    It is quite the misnomer. Obviously, you can't have measurable suction in a collapsible hose, so the wording doesn't make sense...
    "Share your knowledge - it's a way to achieve immortality." - Stolen from Chase Sargent's Buddy to Boss program

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    Quote Originally Posted by npfd801 View Post
    It is quite the misnomer. Obviously, you can't have measurable suction in a collapsible hose, so the wording doesn't make sense...
    I see. Well they have about 25' sections of 5" and 3" that are used to connect the pump to the hydrant. So those would be Soft Suction then.

    But no, they do not carry Hard suction at all.

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