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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default SAR: Cap Rouge II - Final Report

    The final report on the capsizing of CAP ROUGE II, a fishing vessel from the BC coast has finally been released. I don't have a link for the report itself just yet, but here are the hi-lites to it. As some may remember the fishing vessel was at the entrance to Vancouver Harbour when it capsized, drowning 5 of 7 persons onboard, including the Captains young daughter and son. There has been much discussion regarding the use of Coast Guard divers, and military divers for such operations. The end result of those discussions is that there are always two dive teams on 24 hr standby now, out of the Vancouver hovercraft base.

    Report into fishing boat tragedy released

    canada.com Thursday, November 20, 2003

    Cap Rouge Two off the North Arm of the Fraser River. (file)

    CREDIT: Global BC

    More than a year after five people died in a capsized fishing boat off Steveston at the mouth of the Fraser River, the results of the Transportation Safety Board investigation into what went wrong have been released.

    The 47 page report probes what happen in the tragic accident off the waters of the north arm of the Fraser River.

    The Cap Rouge Two, owned and captained by Ben Mabberly of Galiano, left Port Renfrew bound for Steveston carrying 23,000 pounds of fish when it capsized.

    Mabberly's wife, two young children and two others died in the tragedy.

    The Safety Board report says the fishboat was below minimum standards when it entered choppy waters off the mouth of the Fraser River.

    The Board recommends Transport Canada take steps toward educating fishermen about the risks of being on the water.

    The transportation safety board has come up with a number of key recommendations designed to prevent another tragedy.

    It's calling for stability testing to make sure small fishing vessels will remain upright while carrying full loads and is also calling for the federal government to promote vessel loading and stability education in the fishing community.

    © Copyright 2003 Global BC
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    Last edited by MalahatTwo7; 11-20-2003 at 04:57 PM.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

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    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

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  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default FURTHER INFORMATION

    Although this story is primarily of a marine nature, the events that lead to what happened are of some importance. Of particular note, are the final comments of Mr Rezansoff:


    "Sometimes, when you've done something a specific way for 20 years or so, you may not see that's not the safest way to do that."


    I think we've all heard or even said similar words.

    Gear blamed in Cap Rouge tragedy
    Safety board says extra fishing equipment destabilized fishing boat

    Amy Carmichael Canadian Press Friday, November 21, 2003

    Five people aboard the Cap Rouge died when it capsized, including the wife and two children of one of two survivors of the tragedy, Capt. Benjamin Mabberly.

    CREDIT: Ward Perrin, CanWest News Service
    VANCOUVER -- A fishing boat that capsized, killing five people, was destabilized by too much gear, the Transportation Safety Board said Thursday, calling for better education of fishermen to avoid another tragedy.

    The board also recommended the Department of Transport require all new small fishing boats to submit stability data for approval and that existing vessels be subjected to testing by their next scheduled inspection.

    The report was the result of a 15-month investigation into the capsizing of the Cap Rouge II near the mouth of the Fraser River in August 2002. The captain's wife Kathy Mabberley, 11-year-old daughter Amanda, nine-year-old son Wyatt, and cousins Tony Head and Rod Wilson, all from Galiano Island, died.

    "Yesterday the TSB staff spoke with the next-of-kin and hope that even against this tragic backdrop they can take comfort in knowing that at least some good will come from it and that many other lives may be saved as a result of this marine investigation," said Camille Theriault, chairman of the safety board.

    The report described how water welled up on the boat, in which equipment had been installed over the years to suit different fishing needs.

    The boat's stability was "steadily reduced," the report said, as heavier gear and seine nets were installed.

    "The effects of these increases in weight were not monitored or assessed by a suitably qualified person, nor brought to the attention of Transport Canada inspectors between or during routine quadrennial inspections," the board wrote.

    Until now, much of the blame for the deaths was placed on the coast guard dive team.

    The divers arrived quickly at the scene of the capsized 18-metre seiner, but did not enter because they believed regulations prevented them from doing so. Instead, they waited 90 minutes for the arrival of military divers, who then entered the boat.

    The safety board said they did everything possible within the scope of their procedures.

    However, the board did send a letter to the coast guard citing several shortfalls in the rescue attempt.

    It said that although standard procedure calls for two officers and two rescue diving specialists to crew a rescue vessel, that's not enough people to manage a search-and-rescue operation.

    "We have since hired the additional staff necessary in order for us to have safe dives for our employees and hopefully increase the likelihood of rescuing people in overturned vessels," said Terry Tebb, the coast guard's regional direction.

    The board said there are still concerns that divers from different backup teams don't have the ability to communicate with each other about potential hazards.

    Theriault said some crews on fishing vessels don't understand their day-to-day operations may create unsafe conditions.

    "A number of practices were observed that carried risks which were either not fully recognized or were accepted by the skipper," the report said.

    For example, a door on the Cap Rouge II was secured in the open position. That allowed water to flood into the deckhouse when the vessel heeled significantly to the right, reducing its ability to right itself.

    The skipper, Benjamin Mabberley, said he considered the Cap Rouge II to be a "wet boat," indicating it wasn't unusual to see water on the deck or to have to pump it out.

    "Sometimes some people take things for granted," Theriault said. "They're used to going out at sea every day, every week, every month, every year, all of their lives almost and they take safety for granted."

    Bob Rezansoff, head of the B.C. Vessel Owners Assoc., said the idea there is an inadequate culture of safety was only partly true.

    "I don't know that I agree with that," he said, "but as I think about it, in some ways it may be correct.

    "Sometimes, when you've done something a specific way for 20 years or so, you may not see that's not the safest way to do that."

    He's also not sure that more training about safety measures would be effective.

    "The guys who run those boats are used to giving orders, not taking them," Rezansoff said.

    "It can be not always easy to make them see their way is not the best way or even the only way. And by and large, most of these people are careful."

    -- With files from Ian Dutton

    © Copyright 2003 Times Colonist (Victoria)


    **This just in, the final TSB report. Select: Report Number M02W0147 from the website.
    www.tsb.gc.ca/en/reports/marine/2002/
    Last edited by MalahatTwo7; 11-21-2003 at 12:07 PM.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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