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  1. #21
    Forum Member stm4710's Avatar
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    Fireresq........There were a boat load of articles right after this happend. I didnt post them cause they had nothing todo with firefighting. Until this one came out about the 911 call. I posted it for people to look at and say " oh my, that could happen here with our current sops". What I have been able to piece together is----the first call you heard was the inital 911 call. This guy left the station, his son meanwhile forced his way in there stabbed her then himself. Hence you see the mention of the second 911 call. She died 3 days later----from the wounds she got that night. This lady lived in an upstairs apartment---thats how loud she was screaming.The article I posted does not do a very good job describing this murder---nor is really about the murder. Your right this is just the tip of an iceburg.

    I said it MAY have prevented the homicide.
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  2. #22
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    I didnt post them cause they had nothing todo with firefighting.
    Nothing on this thread has to do with firefighting.


    One question, about his leaving....is he a dispatcher or a patrolman? Our dispatchers don't have cars and are not able to go on the road. Our patrolmen do cover the dispatch desk during the dispatchers dinner/lunch hour. Is it possible this guy was just covering a dinner break, which ended at 8 when the call came in, so he self dispatched as it was time for him to return to the road anyway? Seems like there are way too many unknowns here to crucify a guy.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  3. #23
    Forum Member stm4710's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Bones42
    Nothing on this thread has to do with firefighting.


    One question, about his leaving....is he a dispatcher or a patrolman? Our dispatchers don't have cars and are not able to go on the road. Our patrolmen do cover the dispatch desk during the dispatchers dinner/lunch hour. Is it possible this guy was just covering a dinner break, which ended at 8 when the call came in, so he self dispatched as it was time for him to return to the road anyway? Seems like there are way too many unknowns here to crucify a guy.
    Yes it does----
    " oh my, that could happen here with our current sops".
    The reason I said that is hopefully someone might realize that there sop's need changeing to prevent a firefighter from getting a call and takeing an engine by himself to the fire and not letting anyone esle know about it.
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  4. #24
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    The reason I said that is hopefully someone might realize that there sop's need changeing to prevent a firefighter from getting a call and takeing an engine by himself to the fire and not letting anyone esle know about it.
    If I had a FF get a phone call reporting a fire and they took a truck by themself and told noone else....an SOP is the last thing I would be thinking about. I'd probably be taking a good, long, hard look at my membership review committee and wonder how this JA got in my department.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  5. #25
    Forum Member stm4710's Avatar
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    True bones. But Beverly PD didnt think anyone would ever take a call and just goto it without telling anyone else. If nothing else that policy should be on paper to protect your department ( pd,fd) from the flood of law suits!!!
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  6. #26
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    This is from the original article at the top of this thread.

    According to Beverly's 911 policy, dispatchers are supposed to do three things:

    * Determine the exact location where emergency assistance is required.

    * Dispatch the appropriate services to the emergency.

    * Remain on the line with the caller for as long as it is necessary to satisfy the emergency.

    Based on the tape and other information provided by police, it appears Raymond Beals did not adhere to the second and third parts of the policy.
    Also, the article clearly states that he is a Patrolman, not a dispatcher.

    The last time that I checked, it was mandatory for a graduate of a police academy TO BE A FRIGGIN' ADULT! SOP's tell you the proper accepted way to do things. The SOP's would look like an encyclopedia if it addressed all the things NOT to do.


    What I have been able to piece together is----the first call you heard was the inital 911 call. This guy left the station, his son meanwhile forced his way in there stabbed her then himself. Hence you see the mention of the second 911 call. She died 3 days later----from the wounds she got that night. This lady lived in an upstairs apartment---thats how loud she was screaming.The article I posted does not do a very good job describing this murder---nor is really about the murder.
    Are you sure about this? You're saying he broke in again after the cop left the same night and killed her?

  7. #27
    Forum Member PFire23's Avatar
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    Jesse, quit while you are ahead. This has NOTHING to do with SOP's and everything to do with a cop father trying to cover his criminal son's *****. It's a pretty cut and dry situation with the motivation behind hanging up on the caller and tending to the situation himself.


    I don't think that a firefighter would get a call saying HIS house was burning down and try to extinguish it himself
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  8. #28
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    I can't think of any place where a FF would take a phone call, and respond by himself to a fire. that's just an absurd scenario, and your comparing apples to oranges.

    You see, I don't know. I never said I did. All I know is that the cop did not do his job. I never said it would have prevented the homicide. I said it MAY have prevented the homicide.
    George, your right. he did not do his job. if someone else has responded, a homicide might have been prevented. or it might not have. all we have is the info from this article, which from what stm4710 says, doesn't describe the murder very well. the bottom line is we can't say for sure what would have happened if propoer protocol was followed.
    Last edited by DrParasite; 12-08-2003 at 12:40 PM.
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  9. #29
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    Default some other articles

    from http://www.boston.com/news/local/mas...ves_questions/ on 12/02/03

    BEVERLY -- The day after Thanksgiving, Beverly Police Officer Raymond Beals responded to a domestic disturbance call with an unusual twist: It involved his son. Jason Beals, 34, was arguing with Lori Corbett, his girlfriend, and Corbett's mother had called 911, asking police to get him out of the house.

    The officer, who was working the evening shift, escorted his son from the house on Essex Street and advised Corbett, 26, that she had the right to take out a restraining order against Jason Beals, police said yesterday. According to Police Chief John A. Cassola, Raymond Beals told the other officers on duty Friday that "peace had been restored."

    But yesterday morning, another 911 call brought police once more to the neat bungalow to find Corbett dead and Jason Beals dying, in what authorities believe was a murder-suicide. Both had been stabbed multiple times, police said. Beals later died at Beverly Hospital. Essex District Attorney Jonathan W. Blodgett said there are no other suspects.

    Beverly police are investigating the handling of the initial 911 call, which came in around 7 p.m. Friday. The incident was not logged in police records in accordance with department policy, according to a statement issued yesterday by Beverly Lieutenant Mark Ray. When asked whether department policy allows officers to answer calls involving relatives, Cassola said, "We are looking into that now."

    Yesterday, Corbett's family, along with specialists on policing domestic violence, blasted the department for allowing Beals to handle a call involving his son.

    "That's just poor judgment," said Edward M. Merrick, president of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association. "Generally speaking, we have to be objective and do things independently, and it's implausible to think you can be objective when it involves your family. That's too bad. That's really too bad."

    [background info cut]

    Outside the house on Essex Street yesterday, an aunt of Lori Corbett said her family was angry that Beals was not permanently barred from the house. "That should have been an emergency," said the aunt, who asked not to be named. "If they had done that, today might not have happened."

    Without a restraining order, which neither Corbett nor her mother had sought as of yesterday morning, authorities would have had to arrest Jason Beals to keep him out of the house, where he had lived for several years. Police did not say where Beals went after the Friday night dispute or when he returned. And it is unclear how volatile the argument was, or whether it involved physical violence or other factors that could have justified an arrest.

    Beals's family may have been trying to address the problem in their own way, according to George, who has known Corbett since she was 12. George said Jason Beals's stepmother had been planning to go with Corbett yesterday morning to get a restraining order.

    But from a police policy standpoint, Rod Reder, vice president of the National Institute of Crime Prevention in Tampa and an international teacher of domestic violence police tactics, said it was "just ludicrous" that Raymond Beals took the call.

    "He can't be an independent officer. It's plain and simple," Reder said. "He's emotionally involved. And who wants to arrest their son? And just the appearance that he would side with the son is harmful." In addition, he said, domestic violence calls are typically volatile and known to be of great danger to officers, so having at least two responders present helps ensure safety.

    State guidelines for officers responding to domestic violence situations call for two officers to be dispatched "whenever possible." The Boston Police Department specifically mandates that two officers respond.
    taken from http://www.cmonitor.com/stories/news..._07_2003.shtml on 12/02/03
    Beals was the son of Beverly police Officer Raymond Beals, who responded to a 911 call Friday night from Corbett's mother. At the woman's request, officer Beals removed his son from the Corbetts' home, police said.

    Friday's 911 call was not logged in accordance with department policy, and the call is under investigation. Officer Beals left his assigned post at the 911 dispatch center to respond to the call himself, said Beverly police Chief John Cassola.

    "The indication was that there was not an arrest (on Friday night)," Blodgett said. "Beverly police are looking into" it.

    The call was the first from the home, and there were no restraining orders issued for its occupants, Blodgett said.
    http://news.bostonherald.com/localRe...?articleid=268
    Slain woman's kin: Cop didn't tell her of emergency rights
    By Laurel J. Sweet
    Thursday, December 4, 2003

    The aunt of a Beverly woman brutally slain Monday by her suicidal beau said her niece would never have waited a weekend to take out a restraining order against him had she known she was entitled to emergency protection - even when the courts are closed.

    ``Let others know this is available to them,'' Corinne Sirianni said yesterday as she helped her sister, Gail Corbett, with the grim chore of scrubbing her daughter's spilled blood from her home.

    ``I think (Lori Corbett's murder) could have been avoided,'' she said, ``had the right steps been taken.''

    But officer Raymond Beals, the Beverly cop under investigation for answering Gail Corbett's prophetic plea for help Friday night in the midst of her daughter's boyfriend's home-wrecking rampage, was also Jason Beals' father. And though he told Corbett, 26, of her right to act against his son, Sirianni said he neglected to say she could do so on the spot.

    Instead, Beals sent Jason, 34, to New Hampshire to cool off, then broke department rules by omitting Corbett's 911 call from the police log.

    ``She was going to court Monday morning,'' Sirianni said. ``She e-mailed her boss Sunday night that she had some personal stuff going on she needed to take care of.''

    Jason Beals apparently killed himself Monday morning after hacking Corbett to death with a knife 90 minutes before she could have applied for a restraining order in Salem District Court.

    ``He did the wrong thing,'' Sirianni said of Raymond Beals, 63. But she stopped short of calling for his resignation.

    ``He's lost his son,'' she said wearily, ``and he's going to have to have it on his mind that his son took another life.''

    Steve O'Connell, spokesman for Essex District Attorney Jonathan W. Blodgett, said Corbett was entitled to go to the police station and, after filling out some ``brief'' forms, including an affidavit attesting to her emergency, have an officer contact an on-call judge.

    Thirteen years ago, Raymond Beals was among seven officers named in a $4.5 million federal lawsuit brought against the Beverly Police Department by a former female cop. She charged Beals threatened, spit at and verbally abused her. The suit was settled out of court three years later.
    some of the info is a little contradictory, but now we have a little more info to make comments on.
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  10. #30
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    from http://www.townonline.com/beverly/ne...er12042003.htm

    Murder-suicide strikes Centerville

    By Melissa J. Varnavas / beverly@cnc.com
    Thursday, December 4, 2003

    According to an autopsy report released Tuesday evening, Beverly resident Lori Corbett, 26, was murdered Monday morning, Dec. 1, by Jason Beals, 34, who then committed suicide.

    Police received a 911 hang-up call from 464 Essex St., at 8:23 a.m., Monday morning. An officer responded, saw through a rear window a woman lying on the kitchen floor, and called for backup. Three Beverly police cruisers and a state police cruiser arrived at the scene. The officers kicked in the door and found Corbett with multiple stab wounds. They located Beals in the basement of the home with a self-inflicted would to his chest. Beals was transported to Beverly Hospital where he died shortly after arrival.

    Monday's call was the second 911 summons issued from the home within the past week, Beverly Police Chief John Cassola told reporters at the scene of the crime on Monday.

    According to Cassola, Jason Beals father, Officer Raymond A. Beals Jr., received a 911 call Friday, Nov. 28, while on duty as a dispatch officer. At the time, Lori Corbett's mother, Gail Corbett, also a resident of 464 Essex St., requested assistance in removing Jason Beals from their home.

    Officer Beals left his post, responded to the Centerville home, and removed his son, Cassola said. He allegedly informed the family of their rights to a restraining order. No order was filed. (See related story.)
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

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  11. #31
    Forum Member stm4710's Avatar
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    Thanks dan for finding those. The site I got the orginal off of doesnt keep storys beyond the day. Im confused now though,on FOX 25 news at 10 they said corbet was stabbed and died 3 days later in ICU which would lead me to belive she was stabbed the night of the conflict not sunday/monday. Im anxious to read the offcial report now to get exactly what happend..... If it comes out online ill post it.
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    He was assigned to dispatch. He wasn't a dispatcher. He's still a police officer and he still did the wrong thing.

  13. #33
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    He was assigned to dispatch. He wasn't a dispatcher. He's still a police officer and he still did the wrong thing.
    And that's what I was saying. He was wrong.

    George, I wasn't trying to start an argument with you, because I know it's pointless. Just because someone isn't a LEO, doesn't mean what they have to say isn't credible. In fact, I discussed this with a police officer earlier and he said the same thing I was trying to say.

    Even if a restraining order was in place, would the murder-suicide have still happened? Nobody will ever know, but my guess is that it would have. Obviously the guy had some issues and had his motives. A restraining order probably would not have stopped him if he wanted to do it bad enough.

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    Even if a restraining order was in place, would the murder-suicide have still happened? Nobody will ever know, but my guess is that it would have. Obviously the guy had some issues and had his motives. A restraining order probably would not have stopped him if he wanted to do it bad enough.
    Would that victim have died if the ladder had been placed tpo the correct window as specified in the SOP"s. Nobody will ever know.

    You do your damn job. Period. If you don't do your job, you answer for it. There are NO MITIGATING FACTORS.
    George, I wasn't trying to start an argument with you, because I know it's pointless.
    Why? Because you can't sustain your position?

  15. #35
    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
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    Why? Because you can't sustain your position?
    No, King George, I refuse to argue with you because you will argue with a broomstick, and the broomstick is always wrong. That is the bottom line.

    I have much better ways to spend my time and energy than to try to explain something to a stubborn individual who doesn't like to understand others' opinions, unless they are the same as his (which has to be the correct one). Guess what.......... That's why they areOPINIONS............. nobody has a right or wrong opinion.

  16. #36
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    Originally posted by firenresq77


    No, King George, I refuse to argue with you because you will argue with a broomstick, and the broomstick is always wrong. That is the bottom line.

    I have much better ways to spend my time and energy than to try to explain something to a stubborn individual who doesn't like to understand others' opinions, unless they are the same as his (which has to be the correct one). Guess what.......... That's why they areOPINIONS............. nobody has a right or wrong opinion.
    I understand other's opinions. Why do you have such a problem with mine? This is off the track, but you will notice that I do not post on every thread here like smoe people. I post on threads where I have something to add or have an opinion. I fervently believe in my opinions and will defend them.

    I just hope my loyal subjects understand.
    You may be seated.

  17. #37
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    Originally posted by firenresq77


    No, King George, I refuse to argue with you because you will argue with a broomstick, and the broomstick is always wrong. That is the bottom line.
    hahahahahahahahah!!!!!!! that is a great description of George!!!!

    I'm kind of at a loss for what the arguement is about. We all agree that this officer screwed up. He was assigned dispatch, he took a 911 call about a domestic for his son, and then he left dispatch to respond to the call. He screwed up. there is no argument here.

    The only thing that I think is up for debate is whether or not the botched 911 call directly led to the murder suicide. and none of us can definatively say yes. was there a conflict of interest? yes. again, we all agree on this. if another cop had taken the call, there is a possibility that the sequence of events would have played out exactly as it did.

    Will Internal Affairs lynch this guy? absolutly. will the family sue the department? probably. Is it fair to blame an officer for something that happens 3 days later? something that he didn't expect, and possibly another officer would not have anticipated either? no, I don't htink so.
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  18. #38
    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
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    Originally posted by DrParasite


    hahahahahahahahah!!!!!!! that is a great description of George!!!!

    I'm kind of at a loss for what the arguement is about. We all agree that this officer screwed up. He was assigned dispatch, he took a 911 call about a domestic for his son, and then he left dispatch to respond to the call. He screwed up. there is no argument here.

    The only thing that I think is up for debate is whether or not the botched 911 call directly led to the murder suicide. and none of us can definatively say yes. was there a conflict of interest? yes. again, we all agree on this. if another cop had taken the call, there is a possibility that the sequence of events would have played out exactly as it did.

    Will Internal Affairs lynch this guy? absolutly. will the family sue the department? probably. Is it fair to blame an officer for something that happens 3 days later? something that he didn't expect, and possibly another officer would not have anticipated either? no, I don't htink so.
    And that's exactly what I was trying to say.

    (Yeah, I thought that was a perfect description, too!!)

  19. #39
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    Police officer placed on paid leave

    By MARC FORTIER

    Staff writer


    BEVERLY - Patrolman Raymond Beals has been placed on paid leave pending the conclusion of an internal investigation into his response to a 911 call involving his son two weeks ago.

    Beals, a 25-year veteran of the Beverly Police Department, was working as a dispatcher on Nov. 28 when a domestic disturbance call came in from 464 Essex St., where his son Jason Beals lived with his girlfriend, Lori Corbett, and her mother. Instead of logging the call and sending another officer, police said, Beals left the station, took a cruiser to the house, and told his son to leave.

    According to a 911 tape released last week, he also hung up on the 911 caller, even as a woman believed to be Corbett could be heard screaming in the background. Three days later, Corbett died of stab wounds in the same Essex Street house. Police believe Jason Beals killed her before turning the knife on himself in a murder-suicide.

    Mayor Tom Crean said he hasn't decided if Beals will be disciplined, but he didn't think it made sense to have him on the job until the investigation is finished. He said the investigation should be wrapped up by the end of the week.

    Beals, 63, had taken bereavement leave following his son's death, but that ran out on Sunday. As of yesterday, Crean said, Beals was placed on paid administrative leave by Police Chief John Cassola. Crean stressed that this is not a form of suspension.

    "We want time to go through the investigation," he said. "I think just given the fact he lost his son makes it a little difficult to come to work. And we have an open investigation. I don't think anybody who has an open investigation should be at work until that's over."

    Once the investigation is complete, the mayor said he will decide whether Beals should be suspended or fired, or if he should be disciplined at all.

    "At this point I'm not going to make any decision one way or another until the investigation is over," he said. "I don't want to make any rush to judgment based on rumor or nonfactual information. I want firm facts."

    The investigation into Beals' response to the 911 call on Nov. 28 is being handled internally by members of the Police Department's criminal investigation division, Crean said. If he is not satisfied with the results of the investigation, the mayor reserved the right to call in an outside investigator to look into the situation.

    "If I deem it necessary to bring in an outside investigator, I will at that point," he said. "Anything's possible at this point."

    Though Cassola said Beals acted alone, without informing his supervisor that he was responding to the 911 call, Crean wouldn't rule out the possibility that other officers might face disciplinary action. But he said at present, Beals is the only officer who has been placed on leave.
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  20. #40
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    Murdered woman's father blasts police

    By PAUL LEIGHTON

    Staff writer


    BEVERLY - Lori Corbett's father blasted the Beverly Police Department yesterday for its handling of his daughter's murder, and said he's convinced the problem is more widespread than one officer acting alone.

    David Corbett said he believed that Patrolman Raymond Beals would protect his daughter, after Beals responded to a 911 call on Nov. 28 reporting that his son, Jason, was in an altercation with Lori Corbett. Three days later, Jason Beals stabbed 26-year-old Lori Corbett to death, then killed himself at their home on Essex Street.

    "He's a police officer, and I was sure that she'd be protected," David Corbett said. "More care should've been taken to protect her life."

    David Corbett, who is divorced from Lori's mother and lives in Newmarket, N.H., said he visited his daughter in Beverly on the Sunday before her death. Earlier that day, Lori Corbett had met with Raymond Beals at his home, David Corbett said.

    "I felt confident that Jason Beals' father was going to handle it," he said.

    Corbett also disputed the contention by police that Raymond Beals acted alone when he responded to the 911 call on the Friday before the murder-suicide. Beals was working as the dispatcher when he answered an emergency call from Gail Corbett, Lori's mother.

    According to a transcript of the 911 tape, Raymond Beals hung up on Gail Corbett while she was still talking. He then left the station to go to the house himself. Police Chief John Cassola has said Beals told fellow officers he was leaving to take care of a problem with his son, but did not say the problem was part of a 911 call. Cassola said an internal investigation into Beals' response to the call should be complete by later this week.

    David Corbett said he can't believe no one else in the station that night knew that Beals was answering a 911 call involving his own son.

    "From what I understand, he left the station and jumped into a police cruiser. How could he do that without anybody else knowing that, unless it's just total mismanagement on the part of the whole Police Department - which it is," Corbett said. "I'm upset because I feel like I was let down by the Police Department."

    Corbett said he plans to contact a lawyer to explore the possibility of legal action against Beverly police.

    Mother responds to tape

    Also yesterday, Gail Corbett said she now believes that Raymond Beals was the officer who answered her 911 call. Corbett had said last week that she was convinced Raymond Beals did not answer the call because she did not recognize his voice.

    But after listening to a recording of the 911 tape yesterday, she changed her mind. She said she could tell it was Beals at the point when she said Jason Beals was causing the problem and the police officer responded, 'Ohhh-kay. What's he doing?'"

    Gail Corbett also said she didn't realize that Raymond Beals had hung up on her until she read a transcript of the call in Saturday's Salem News. She said there was no click or dial tone, just dead air, so she assumed that police were on the way to her house.

    "To see in the paper that he hung up on me, that hurt," she said. "He didn't know what predicament he was walking into."

    Gail Corbett said she was about to identify Jason Beals as Officer Raymond Beals' son when she was cut off. On the tape she can be heard saying, "And off ..." before the tape abruptly ends.

    "I just stood there holding the phone and thinking, 'What else is he going to ask now?'" she said.

    Gail Corbett has said that Raymond Beals came to the house within five to seven minutes, and she praised him for his handling of the situation. She said Raymond Beals ordered his son to leave the house immediately and demanded that he turn his key over to Gail Corbett. She said Raymond Beals told his son he could stay on the couch at his house for two days. Instead, Jason Beals went to New Hampshire to stay with his sister.

    Gail Corbett said she has sympathy for Raymond Beals because he lost his son. She said Beals requested that a priest be sent to her house on Monday after her daughter's death, a gesture that she called "very nice." She also said a religious card signed "The Beals family" was dropped off at her daughter's funeral last Friday.

    "I always held Raymond in high regard," Gail Corbett said. "He was always able to control Jason."
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