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  1. #1
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Default In The Year 1903

    The Year 1903

    This ought to boggle your mind,

    The year is 1903...one hundred years ago...what a difference a* century makes! Here are some of the U.S. statistics for 1903:

    The average life expectancy in the U.S. was 47 years.

    Only 14 Percent of the homes in the U.S. had a bathtub.

    Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone.

    A three-minute call from Denver to New York City cost eleven dollars.

    There were only 8,000 cars in the U.S., and only 144 miles of paved roads.

    The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.

    Alabama, Mississippi, Iowa, and Tennessee were each more heavily populated than California. With a mere 1.4 million residents, California was only the 21st- most populous state in the Union.

    The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower.

    The average wage in the U.S. was 22 cents an hour.

    The average U.S. worker made between $200 and $400 per year.

    A competent accountant could expect to earn $2,000 per year, a dentist
    $2,500 per year, a veterinarian between $1,500 and $4,000 per year, and a
    mechanical engineer about $5,000 per year.

    More than 95 percent of all births in the U.S. took place at home.

    Ninety percent of all U.S. physicians had no college education.Instead, they attended medical schools, many of which were condemned in the press and by the government as "substandard."

    Sugar cost four cents a pound. Eggs were fourteen cents a dozen.Coffee cost fifteen cents a pound.

    Most women only washed their hair once a month, and used borax or egg yolks for shampoo.

    Canada passed a law prohibiting poor people from entering the country for any reason.

    The five leading causes of death in the U.S. were:
    1. Pneumonia and influenza

    2. Tuberculosis

    3. Diarrhea

    4. Heart disease

    5. Stroke

    The American flag had 45 stars. Arizona, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Hawaii, and Alaska hadn't been admitted to the Union yet.

    The population of Las Vegas, Nevada, was 30.

    Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea hadn't been invented.

    There was no Mother's Day or Father's Day.

    One in ten U.S. adults couldn't read or write. Only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated high school.

    Marijuana, heroin, and morphine were all available over the counter at corner drugstores. According to one pharmacist, "Heroin clears the complexion, gives buoyancy to the mind, regulates the stomach and the bowels, and is, in fact, a perfect guardian of health."

    18 percent of households in the U.S. had at least one full-time servant or domestic.

    There were only about 230 reported murders in the entire U.S.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************


  2. #2
    Forum Member firemanpat29's Avatar
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    No canned BEER ?????? how did they survive?

  3. #3
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    Pat,
    Why of course they had bottles silly !
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  4. #4
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    By 1903, the Great Fire had become a fading memory to all, as the city was swept by succeeding waves of immigrants from the Old World. The Iroquois Theater was one of the great entertainment venues in this thriving industrial center. It was one of the big stops on the vaudeville circuit, drawing the great performers of its day. So it was on Dec. 30, 1903, that the stage was set for another epic lesson in fire safety: one which would come at a great human cost.

    The comedian Eddie Foy was starring in a matinee performance of the musical comedy, "Mr. Bluebeard." A standing-room-only audience estimated at 2,000 people crowded the theater. At some point during the performance, a spotlight overheated and burst into fire way up in the stagehand's overhead. The fire that ensued spread quickly through the flammable backstage rigging. Workers attempted to beat the fire out with sticks in a vain attempt to extinguish the blaze. A piece of flaming cloth fell to the stage. In a vain attempt to calm the crowd, Foy had the band continue playing. Suddenly, a woman cried out and the audience made a mad dash for the exits. As the firemen moved in to extinguish the flame, they were met with a tangle of human bodies, all entwined and badly burned.

    The cause of death for many came from the terrible smoke and flames. Most, however, had been trampled and crushed in the rush to leave the hall. Authorities considered it a miracle that only 602 people succumbed to the fire.

    The Iroquois Theater was built of fire-resistive materials. Experts agree that it was well-built, but they also point out that many important fire protection features were missing or inoperable at the time of the fire. These include:

    • Blocked asbestos curtains.
    • Installed ventilators that were not in operation.
    • Exits not properly marked.
    • Exits blocked with draperies, wood and glass doors.
    • No installed alarm system.
    • No fire protection devices such as extinguishers and standpipes.
    • No automatic sprinklers in the stage area, even though it was a municipal requirement.


    The investigation that followed led to a variety of fire safety improvements, all of which addressed the problems listed above. In fact, many cities still provide a uniformed firefighter or group of firefighters for major entertainment events.
    Last edited by E40FDNYL35; 01-10-2004 at 08:44 AM.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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