1. #51
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    I would feel goofy sitting at a stoplight with my lights whirling and flashing, waiting for the light to turn green. If you could move against traffic control devices with due regard that would make more sense.
    I would feel the same way, you look stupid sitting there at a light with your lights going, but like I said aways back, here if you come up to a traffic light, you have the red light and stop, 9 times out of 10 everyone at the light is going to stop to and be waiting on you. It is at that point that I would go through the light because it makes no sense to sit there holding everyone up until your light turns green because no on is going to move, but they will be watching you and you will just look stupid.

    Fortunaly, I have no traffic lights on my route to the station from my house to station 1, but only 3 stop signs. I do have 1 light and many stopsigns between me and station 2 though.
    ---Steve---

  2. #52
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    Here in Michigan, we are allowed to have lights and sirens on our POVs, we are allowed to exceed the prima facie speed limits so long as he or she does not endanger life or property, this is granted to us by Public Act 300 of 1949. However, you have to follow your departments Bylaws and SOPís. My department only allows us to exceed the prima facie speed limit by 10 mph as long as road conditions provide. If you have lights and sirens or not, you should never go through a red light or a stop sign without stopping first. You should always try to make eye contact with the other drivers at the intersection before you proceed. Remember we are only asking for the right of way and that does not have to be granted

    One thing everyone in every state has to remember is we did not cause the problem they called us for help. We are no help if we cannot respond because we caused another accident then you are no help for them or your department. WE ALL need to stop Breath and let our Brains CATCH UP before we go out there and respond to any emergency.

  3. #53
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    In Montana we can display a red light. No wig-wags, bars, or sirens. We are allowed to exceed posted limites by 10 mph. We are required to follow all other traffic signals and signs.

    I live three miles from the station and was recently interviewed by the officers. They were concerned that I was arriving too quickly.

    I understand their concern and was happy that they were paying attention to what they felt was a safety concern.

    The chief actually came to my rescue and explained that I often listen to a scanner and hear police and EMS get dispatched to scenes. Police and EMS are commonly dispatched before fire so when I hear tones for a probable fire event, I head to the station.

    When they heard that I was well versed in the regs and understood the liabilities, end of interview...

    The silly thing is that in the last two years we have had a total of three volunteers who have had 'conversations' with PD while responding to the station. Two were for speeding, and one was for a fender-bender. All three volunteers are police officers

    Regards, Chris.

  4. #54
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    In TN, we can use all the devices (red lights, sirens, PS system, etc..) approved by the local fire chief upon notification of the Sherriff or Police Chief.

    I am a member of a local 100% collie rescue squad. We do not have any fire apparatus, but we are one of the top squads in the nation for medical\flood\trench\diaster\etc.. in the nation.

    We are allowed to respond to the scene, so would a medical call change your opinion of the need to increase speed? Because with a med. call...seconds DO count and can mean the diffrence between life and death.

    I know around here, it is about half and half with those who have L&S and those who do not. Of the 50% that have L&S, we respond with increased speed according to the need of medical assistance. For example, for a man with mild to moderate chest pain, we may respond at about the speed limit, but if a call comes in about a 5 year old face-down in a pool...I guarantee that just about every member will be responding at ~20mph, or whatever conditions will allow.

    Just currious if a medical call would change your opinions.

    John

  5. #55
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    Not only EMS calls but any call where there is a clear threat to life is almost certain to get a faster response. Like you said in your example, a responder will 'step it up' when it's obvious that minutes or seconds can make the difference. It all depends on the type of call we get. When the pager tones out some evenings here, most of our responders don't start moving until they hear certain phrases such as "Unresponsive PT" or "CPR in Progress". That's a sure way to get people moving. Most volunteers here screen calls and if it's something worth getting out of their house for then they will be running Lights and Siren.
    Example-
    This past Monday morning at about 4:15am our pagers went off for a wreck at an address on the Mississippi River Road. Sheriff's Office was notified and sent a unit to the area. No FFs were moving. Five minutes later the SO had 911 repage us for a wreck with injuries and entrapment with fuel leaking. THAT got everyone out of bed and 10 minutes later there were 8 FF/FR with the rescue truck and 2 pumpers on scene. They just had to say the right words to get us up.
    Last week a resident called in a "Strange Odor" call after a barge on the River vented some MethalEthalBadStuff in the area. We were paged out for a "Odor Responce" but nobody responded except the City Police and the Sheriff's Office. There's not much we could do except to tell the residents to close their windows and turn off their A/C. No FFs were going to get out of bed for this call.
    A few days ago we were paged to a home for a "Panic Attack". No FFs responded to that call either. You could say that by not having a bunch of FF/FRs parked in their yard at 1am we were just trying to keep from causing the panic attack to get worse. The Police Department stood by until the ambulance got there in about 20 minutes and transported the patient to a hospital in Baton Rouge.
    If we are paged to "Fire Alarm" calls then there's a chance that nobody will run. This happened once when the alarm at the local Truckstop/Cascino went off and we were paged 4 times before the Police Officer on scene finally turned off the alarm and everyone went back to gambleing. Nobody was going to get up until they heard "Working Fire" or "Visible Smoke" over the pager. I think the Chief stopped by the Truckstop the next day.
    A couple of weeks ago while I was at work we got paged to a fire at a local polymer manufacturing plant. I stopped by the station the next morning after I got off work to find out what happened. It turns out that we did have a couple FFs and a couple pumpers respond. They arrived behind our Mutual Aid, a truck from Baton Rouge with 3 fulltime Paid FF/EMTs. In fact, it was the Baton Rouge crew that put the smoldering fire out. Our guys may have moved a little faster if had been paged out as a "Working Fire".
    It's rare that a call comes in that it's necessary to fun Full Code. I only have a red Cadet revolving dash light and no siren and I almost never use the light until I'm pulling up on a scene to identify myself and my vehicle as I look over the scene and find a safe place to park.
    Drive Safe,
    Cellblock

  6. #56
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    Damn...

    Story. There is a video link to the news report on this page.

    Another (not on the front firehouse page)

    Another

    Regards, Chris.

  7. #57
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    In the state of New South Wales, Australia, vollies either driving to the station or directly to the scene in their POV's are subject to all normal traffic laws. If you are caught by the police generally there will be no sympathy from them and if the fire service finds out about it, there will definitely be no sympathy forthcoming. - Peter.

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