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  1. #1
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    Question Rip & Run Systems

    Does your county or area dispatch utilize a rip & run system that sends dispatch/box alarm information to a station printer? How does it get transmitted from dispatch, phoneline/modem, radio/modem, broadband? If so where are you from?
    Thanks!
    Mike
    "Improvise, Adapt, Overcome".........
    Clint Eastwood, Heartbreak Ridge

    I.A.C.O.J.

    E.S.A.D.

    NYS SFI


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    We use a combination rip and run, and radio dispatch system. The printers are connected via phone line to dispatch. They list address, situation, trucks responding and the nearest cross street on both sides of the address. When the system is up it works great. Coupled with our MDT units witch display the same info its great. We are currently working on adding GIS to the MDTs can't wait for that.
    Muncie Indiana.

  3. #3
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    Our rip and run system is hooked up through a phone line to dispatch. I guess it works a lot like fax machine?

    We get two copies of the report. The first is the truck copy, the other is the office copy. This way, the first truck can go with it, and the straglers can look at the information and leave it on the radio desk.

    It gives us address, contact number, caller name and number, crossroads, gun permit information. We can also input information into the system. For preplanning purposes. Such as if you have a pool, we can input that information and set up a zone. This way if we ever get a fire within say a mile of your house, and you have a pool, it will show up. This way, we have an primary water supply if needed. We can do this with all sorts of information, if you have a dog, propane tank, pools, ponds and all sorts of fun information. It will also give us for an ambulance calls it will say something like that Allegheny police have an AED so if you want them sent, since they might be able to beat you, they can be easily sent.

    Also lists all the equipment dispatched.

    After the call it prints out 2 copies of the final rip and run. This lists all the same information, except it adds En-route time, onlocation time, clearing time and information such as that.

    Its a really neat system. If your considering getting hooked up, do it.

    My location in Western New York in the heart of Amish country. Cattauraugus County, NY.
    Firefighter/EMT Mitch Cowen
    Hose Co. 1 1st Lieutenant
    Randolph Fire Co. Inc

  4. #4
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    IN my department we obviously use a radio dispatch but we also have faxmachines in the truck back that print out. We will get the address, the cross streets, caller names, type of call, and time of initial call.

  5. #5
    Dispatch Dweller Jay911's Avatar
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    We use two systems, one for in-city which have leased-line station printers, and one for out of city which have fax machines. Both are tied into the CAD and send the information at the same time as a rig is attached to the call on CAD.

    The in-city system also sets off the station tones, turns off the stove(s), and opens the PA relay in the hall to allow our voice dispatch transmission to go out over a 400mhz radio channel to a receiver linked to the PA. All this except the voice path is handled over a Zetron paging encoder connected directly to a CAD terminal.

    The out-of-city system runs at the same time as the in-city system, but doesn't allow for any station alerting, which must be done manually, by either phone patch to radio channel, or direct paging on the Motorola Centracom system. The printouts for out-of-city are handled by a gang of faxmodems connected to the CAD server.

    Not only does this do "rip-n-run" type printouts, but also generates final report printouts to the stations when the last rig leaves the scene.

    Other alerting types we use include sending incident data to alpha pagers upon attaching a rig to a call. Also, mobile computing terminals are starting to be installed which will deliver the entire call information directly to the rig being sent.

    All this happens in Calgary, Alberta.

    --j.
    Last edited by Jay911; 01-29-2004 at 11:39 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member hotboy's Avatar
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    I believe we all have the same system. It is transmitted from dispatch via phone line,to modem to printer. Its basically a fax.
    Delaware County,PA
    If we don't do it nobody else will!!!!

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up Thanks for the info!

    Thanks for the input. If anyone is using a radio/packet modem system let me know, that is the way Madison County, NY is likely to go as almost every phone call leaving 911 is a long distance charge. I would like to know what the reliability of such a system is.

    Our neighbors in Onondaga county are using a phone based system which sends data via dedicated phone line to a modem then into a Panasonic dot matrix printer. Problems include aging printers with no replacements, they get all the data so it prints 3-4 pages for each dispatch, supplemental data report and another 3-4 pages for the alarm close. A typical call might have 12 - 20 pages of report sitting on the floor.

    My partner developed a software package called ADI that receives the data in the fire station PC, prints out a neat, easy to read "condensed" dispatch page (1 sheet) and a 1 page alarm close. When coupled with his display software FSID, incoming dispatch data and box alarm assignments are displayed on the computer monitor at any PC networked in the station. We also are able to remote dispatch data to locker rooms, truck bays, meeting rooms, etc. using a led display signs.

    Another nice aspect is all the data that 911 transmits to the station resides on your PC, so if your printer ran out of paper or someone lost the printout you can bring it up on your PC and reprint, no longer do you need to call the 911 center for a re-transmission. Several local departments have 3-4 years of data at their finger tips.

    We have developed interfaces for phone, radio and broadband connections, depending what your system uses. Visit fdcms.com for more info.
    "Improvise, Adapt, Overcome".........
    Clint Eastwood, Heartbreak Ridge

    I.A.C.O.J.

    E.S.A.D.

    NYS SFI

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber ramseycl's Avatar
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    We are working on getting a rip and run system. Right now have a radio dispatch system and alpha numeric pagers. The pagers, give you address, cross street, and type of call.

  9. #9
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Smile Will Wonders Never Cease..................

    You learn something new from the FORUMS every day. We've had a CAD system with station printers for years, and until today, I've never heard the term "Rip and Run". Basicly, our CAD system analyzes the call and recommends an assignment. A human (usually an alien life form in a dispatch supervisor's body) MUST OK the CAD before the alarm is transmitted. When the dispatcher keys the OK, the tones are set off for the units and the printers are activated, along with the Alpha-Numeric pagers. All printers are linked with phone lines. They are also a "Two-Way street" in that we can send info back to dispatch and/or other stations. Works for us. But then, we're in a slow area, only 131,000 incidents last year. Stay Safe....
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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  10. #10
    Dispatch Dweller Jay911's Avatar
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    I just realized, I don't think the term was ever actually defined in this thread..

    In the Calgary system, the "rip and run" printout is an initial dispatch report. The station will get a printout with the current time, date, call number, address, map number, call type, and apparatus attached, along with radio zone and tac channel. Due to the way our new CAD works, they also get any comments put on the call up to the point when they're dispatched. In my opinion, this is good if EMS has put "HOLD BACK" on the call, but not so good if the apparatus being attached is for crew relief 14 hours into an event.

    The final incident report is the full chronology and unit run times report, complete with all comments added to the call from start to close.

    --j.

  11. #11
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    Down Under in Victoria, Australia we have alphanumeric pagers, and an off air decoder that receivers the same signal as the pagers and prints it out. We're in a slow area too - the local fire department only has 1,300-odd fire stations.
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

    ...and before you ask - YES I have done a Bloody SEARCH!

  12. #12
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    You should feel very lucky, we have a rip and run system that is comprised of some units sitting in some box somewhere, probably in a warehouse in Florida. The county keeps letting us know how well they will work when they get here....HA! I guess we are a little behind the times here. Our station only got a telephone last year. So for now, we will just have to settle for the good old fashioned dispatcher, and pray they can do their job in an orderly fashion.

  13. #13
    Dispatch Dweller Jay911's Avatar
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    I think it was last year or the year before that a series of articles on the Detroit Fire Department was published. One of the stories included ways that crews jury-rigged alerting systems in their halls, such as placing a metal bar on the fan-fold computer paper so it would fall on the floor and make a noise when the calls came in to the printer, because otherwise they didn't have any audible notification of a call.

    Every time someone complains about our alerting system I remember that story.

    --j.

  14. #14
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    We get alerted over the radio and also get a rip and run sheet from dispatch. Our problem is that the printers are slow. So if you want to take the sheet with you it needs to done printing. The info on the sheet is pretty basic such as address, cross streets and section #. There is no hydrant or special hazard info on the sheets.

  15. #15
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    We are toned out with voice pagers and given address and type of situation. Our stations then recieve a printed copy of address, situation, dispatch times and soon a map with address highlighted. This is done through a phone line fax. Upon returning to station we recieve a chronicled time sheet of in route and returning etc.

  16. #16
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    Default Clarification

    I wanted to clarify my original posting, we also are dispatched via voice pager & station siren. Our neighboring county uses voice paging, alpha numeric paging, station sirens (although many depts are getting away from this)and station printers hooked to 911 via phone line. My county is purchasing a new cad system, with a rip & run printer system. The problem is they are looking for an economical way to get the info to the firehouses. 19 of the 23 stations are a long distance call from the 911 center. That's why they are looking into use of a radio/packet modem system. Higher up front costs but cheaper over the long haul.

    I was just wondering if anyone else out there has had experience with radio based "rip n run" systems.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    "Improvise, Adapt, Overcome".........
    Clint Eastwood, Heartbreak Ridge

    I.A.C.O.J.

    E.S.A.D.

    NYS SFI

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