1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    17

    Default Super Single Rears

    Can anybody tell me the maximum weight capacity for both a single and tandem rear axles with super single tires (solid axles, i.e. not All-Steer or tag axles)?

    How many out there have experience with this type of setup? I know Pierce's All-Steer tends to go through tires pretty quickly due to tire scrub, but what about the solid rears (both single and tandem), as mentioned above? Why did you/did you not choose them, and how have they performed? Snow, ice, mud, gravel, sand, highway driving?
    Last edited by FFEMT545; 03-02-2004 at 01:52 AM.

  2. #2
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    18

    Default

    How much weight you can carry depends on alot of things.Provincial or State laws usually have a maximum.Here in British Columbia 9100Kg or 20000lbs is the max per axle without an overweight permit.It also depends on the tire capacity.Usually a 385R22.5 can carry about 18000lbs and a 425R22.5 about 20000lbs.They aren't as good in snow or mud.If you blow a tire on the way to a call your s.o.l where at least with duals you still have one tire to run on.It does way less though if that matters.

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Pierce rates their All-Steer up to 26,000 lbs on a single rear and 52,000 on a tandem, so I would think that a solid would be at least that.

    It seems to be a point of discussion on whether they are better in the snow or not. On icy roads I would think that the super singles might slide a little bit more, but it seems that in deep snow they would be superior: the front and back tires could be designed to run in the same tracks, meaning the truck only has to cut a path through the snow once.

    I find it very hard to believe that they would be worse in mud; dualies tend to plug up in mud - wouldn't singles be better here?

  4. #4
    Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    32

    Default

    look on alcoa web site, they have the wheels on there with tire sizes and specs.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    45

    Default

    You can get rear axle ratings up to 33k on a single rear. These are mostly seen on single axle aerials/quints as a 31k axle. The 33k just came out and is in use by one or two manufacturers on their single axle 75' quint design.
    Be cautioned that weight rating has nothing to do with 'brake rating.' I know that the 33k rated rear axle only has 31k rated brakes.
    This is for standard tires. Don't know much about the single wheel units like the all-steer.
    "The light that goes around, even up-side down".

  6. #6
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    17

    Default Tire scrub for super singles

    Do super singles on either solid tandem- or solid single-rear axles have any issues with tire scrub (I know this is an issue with super singles on Pierce's All-Steer)?

    Does anybody have anything to add to the original questions in this thread as well?

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,273

    Default

    Just a few quick words on this...


    If you are buying an Quint or aerial ladder, use a tamdem axle and not a single axle.


    Why? Better weight distruibtion and dual rear brakes.

    Don't let a company tell you that you don't need a tamdem axle on a 75 foot Quint. You do need it.

    We have one single rear axle Ferrara 75' Quint. We have had a lot of axle and rear end problems with this one. The other Quints 75' - 105', that was made by Pierce, have had cause any problems.

    When you do change tires, like any other type of apparatus, you want to change all the tires on that axle. This keeps the same even amount of thread where the rubber meets the road. Much safer doing this. Use the same size tires that came with the truck. Don't change sixes, this can cause problems with steering, breaking and loading with the vehicle.


    I said a few words, well I went a little longer to get the point made.



    Stay Safe & Well out there....
    Last edited by CaptOldTimer; 03-12-2004 at 10:58 AM.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Madison, WI USA
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Well, as far as super singles go, for doing any type of off road work, they are great. I used to drive Concrete truck, still do part time. They all had the super singles for the steer and both drives. The trucks hauled up to 80,000 lbs. Duals will get you stuck in the mud because they pack mud between them and end up working like a racing slick.

    I dont know about the all steer. I know the steerable tags and pushers we used helped decrease tire wear due to scrubbing quite a bit as compared to the fixed type. Tires lasted twice as long.

    Now, as far as axles go, I for the life of me can't figure out why a commercial truck that hauls say 78,000 lbs, has to have four axles in the back and a steer axle with a jake brake. But, if you have a fire truck with that same wieght, you only have to have a steer, a set of tandems and a auxiliary braking device. I know we are exempt from some weight laws, depending on the state. But physics are still the same. There is less braking capacity available in a set of tandems than in a quad axle setup.

    Just some thoughts.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register