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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default I Tried To Figure This Out... And Can't

    School Bus Video Shows Child's Brutal Beating
    Mother Looking For New School For Seventh-Grade Son

    UPDATED: 2:03 p.m. EST February 12, 2004

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- A 12-year-old boy was punched repeatedly by several boys on a school bus, and nobody seemed to do anything to stop it.

    Mom Says Watching Her Son Beaten Was "Devastating"

    That's what a video camera mounted on a First Student bus recorded last week as a seventh-grader was beaten as he was riding home from Landon Middle School.

    While police say the beating lasted about 30 seconds, the tape shows seven different students punching the boy.

    "I didn't get a chance to say anything because they just wouldn't stop," Si' Mone Small said.

    "You feel helpless," his mother, Sashemia Small, said about watching video of the beating. "I felt like someone was in my chest squeezing; I couldn't breathe. It was devastating."

    Jacksonville TV station WJXT carefully viewed the videotape obtained from police evidence, and it showed that the bus never stopped during the fight, so the driver never got involved.

    "At one point you can't even see my child. There are so many individuals on him you couldn't even see him," the mother said. "How could you finish your route after you just saw, like, a child brutally attacked like that and drop him off like nothing occurred?"

    The principal said the video made her sick, and that as soon as she found out what happened and identified the seven students involved, she suspended them. She will also recommend they be transferred to an alternative school.

    After the beating, Si' Mone's mother had him checked out at a hospital. He was bruised on the back of his head and neck, but there were no serious injuries.

    The boy insists that he did nothing to provoke the beating and the video tended to bear that out.

    "My son's never been in a fight before," Sashemia Small said.

    She is now finding a new school for her son.

    "You want me to send my child back there?" Small said. "What will the next call be; for me to view my son's body? No, I'm not sending him back there."

    First Student told WJXT-TV it is reviewing the tape and conducting its own investigation. The driver is on administrative leave.
    Distributed by Internet Broadcasting Systems, Inc.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

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  2. #2
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Shouldn't the bus driver be looking where they are heading instead of watching everything that's happening on the bus? I think I saw this video on the news last night and it appeared there were some people standing between the camera and the child. The camera was ceiling mounted so it could see over the people. Not sure that the driver would have seen anything other than the back of people's heads.

    Not making any excuses for the kids.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Having rode the bus to school, and on various school trips; add to that my Mom was also a bus driver for a few years. We were not allowed to get away with anything at any time, which also included being up and out of your seat while the bus was in motion. Our drivers were always aware of what was going on in the back, and ANY unsafe behaviour was not tolerated AT ALL.

    Now they have cameras as well as mirrors. In my opinion, this event should never have happened, or at least been allowed to go to the point it did. As a driver, you are reponsible for the actions of your passengers... at least it would seem that is the general rule of thumb except for in Jacksonville, FL maybe.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

  4. #4
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    I'll agree with that. I thought it was a little odd that so many kids were up and moving.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  5. #5
    Temporarily/No Longer Active Cellblock776's Avatar
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    While police say the beating lasted about 30 seconds, the tape shows seven different students punching the boy.
    Wow, seven kids beating up on the boy. That's like the ENTIRE bus load. My driver would have noticed THAT.

  6. #6
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    I saw that...Some of those kids looked pretty big too...If I had been bus driver..Those kids woulda gotten thrown off my bus one by one into the ditch..Little Fools...No Need Of It Whatsoever..I know if a kid that size beat up my son there'd be hell to pay...

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default IN A SIMILAR VEIN

    Students hear of lives thrown away

    Jim Gibson Times Colonist

    Katy Hutchison, widow of Bob McIntosh, who was slain in a violent incident at an unsupervised teen party in Squamish, reads a letter of regret from his killer to students at Esquimalt high school. The killer, Ryan Aldridge, is pictured on the laptop computer at right.

    CREDIT: Darren Stone, Times Colonist

    Bob McIntosh: slain because he was a good neighbour, checking on a rowdy party at a friend's house.

    Katy Hutchison wants the 255 students in Esquimalt High's theatre to see one more photo of Bob McIntosh, the focus of her audio-visual presentation, The Story of Bob.

    She has already shown slides of him as a baby, young hockey player, teenage VW bug owner, law-school grad, free-style skier, the man she married in an Elk Lake garden, party animal, super dad to their now 11-year-old twins Sam and Emma, Squamish lawyer and elite triathlete at 40.

    He's the only reason that Hutchison and the students are having this assembly, one more in the 75 presentations she has given since the fall at schools and juvenile detention centres throughout Victoria and the Lower Mainland.

    But it's the next slide that stills an already engrossed room. Later, student Jovan Radovanovich says they had not been told ahead of time anything about the presentation. Until the pivotal slide, he had thought it was just about "a good athlete."

    The slide tells a different story. It shows McIntosh in the morgue, a tube in his mouth, hours after his 1997 beating death at a drug- and alcohol-fuelled New Year's Eve teen party in Squamish. A good neighbour, he had gone to check on a party at the home of a friend who had left his son behind while he vacationed.

    And The Story of Bob becomes a tale of wrong choices, mob brutality, and ways to overcome them. "It has great, great impact," says student Caleb Scott, later comforting a female student left sobbing by the presentation. It rated a standing ovation from the young audience. Like many students at the assembly, Scott has been to big unsupervised house parties but nothing close to the fatal Squamish party.

    Ryan Aldridge is as much in the auditorium as anyone serving five years for manslaughter at Matsqui prison can be. Hutchison reads aloud a letter the 25-year-old man wrote specifically for audiences like this, encouraging them to make "better choices than I did" and "learn about the price of violence."

    "I do know that doing jail time is easy compared to the guilt that I will have to live with for the rest of my life," he says.

    But what's hard to grasp is why Hutchison, 42, bothers to be where she was this week, and will be most weekdays at other schools until the end of spring term.

    The justice system has let the man who fatally kicked Bob's head out on day-parole less than half way through his sentence. The same system let Ryan MacMillan, the young man whose first punch set the night's brutality in motion, off with a conditional discharge.

    Hutchison chose not to be angry. She opted for forgiveness rather than revenge, attitudes she remembers as her father's. He dealt with crises "elegantly and thoughtfully," encouraging his children to "consider the affect our actions have and their consequences before we did something," she muses in an interview.

    Ultimately, her twins put her on the path she took.

    "I didn't know until I looked into my children's eyes and knew their lives were not going to be about Bob's death," Hutchison says. "Anger is such a dead end. If I'd chosen to be angry, I couldn't have given Sam and Emma a life."

    By spring of 1998, she had left Squamish for her old hometown Victoria. Her decision wasn't just to reach resolution through geography.

    "I watched a lot of people get so consumed -- they never got over it. I'm not saying I got over it. He will always have a place in my heart."

    Her presence made once-close friends uncomfortable. Some would sob on seeing her. Others would cross the street to avoid her. "I was a powerful reminder that Bob was gone -- they had to live and work in that community."

    She has been judged so harshly for how she dealt with the family tragedy -- particularly for her early marriage to Victoria lawyer Mike Hutchison -- that she now refuses to judge anyone else's actions.

    Within days of the killing, Hutchison and many others knew the suspects' names. But the town's code of silence stonewalled their arrests for nearly five years.

    Hutchison had told the RCMP that she wanted to meet Alridge. Initially, she did this via a taped message played to him before his confession.

    "I said he needed to know something about Bob -- he'd never met him -- the man he'd killed. He needed to know something about myself and my children."

    Their first face-to-face meeting came the morning-after in a two-chair room at the Squamish RCMP office. The man escorted into the room wore no shoes and was shorter than average with a soccer player's build. He brought a letter of apology.

    "He sits down, and he starts to cry," recalls Hutchison, who kept handing him Kleenex. "I'm telling him it's okay now. He'll get help."

    After leaving the room, she passed the television system set up to monitor their encounter. It was still broadcasting. "I could see him in the room by himself, and he was sobbing, that's when I lost it."

    They met again last October in Matsqui where Alridge had almost "a twinkle in his eye" that wasn't there before. He's taking self-help programs along with an autobody course in prison.

    Hutchison showed him her school presentation. She wanted him involved. He wrote -- and re-wrote -- the letter she now reads aloud. Once on day-parole, she wants him there.

    "I think it would be more powerful if he comes with me."

    Alridge is a part of her life, but not so much that she would ever have him over for Christmas. "I wouldn't call him a friend. He's someone whose life became linked to mine."

    Nonetheless, she envisions a positive future for him: "I think he'll get a job in an autobody shop, marry his girlfriend, have a child and lead a very grateful existence.

    "He doesn't have to win the Nobel Prize," she says. But if he helps to raise "a happy, caring child," Bob McIntosh's early death will not end up a complete waste.

    © Copyright 2004 Times Colonist (Victoria)
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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