Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: hydrant markers

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1

    Default hydrant markers

    Our fire association feels it necessary to have hydrant markers. But there seems to be many pros and cons to each type (flags, reflectors on the road, painted symbols on the road).

    What I would like are your opinions on what I have listed above or another way of tagging a hydrant.

    Weather is a factor were I live. We get snow. Lately a lot of snow.

    Thank you


  2. #2
    Forum Member backdraft663's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Cincinnati Ohio Area
    Posts
    865

    Default

    Some towns around here have a little fiberglass pole on top of the hydrants, they have reflective trim wrapped around them, there good for when you get alot of snow and cover them up, and also when there is brush hiding them.

    Also if your buddy buddy with the road department you can get the reflectors in the prosperous areas (in front of the plug) a different color, you know the reflectors between the yellow lines, I think somewhere around here they use a blue reflector for the hydrants.
    Ryan

    I.A.C.O.J. Probie

    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing which you think you cannot do. -Eleanor Roosevelt

    Lets not forget those lost on 9-11-01

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber EFD840's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Eclectic (no, NOT electric), Alabama
    Posts
    1,510

    Default

    We've always put blue reflectors in the road. The problems are 1) they eventually get busted or knocked off and 2) whenever the road is paved, you gotta do them all over again.

    I just recently noticed that another department in the county has started putting amber reflectors around the barrel of the hydrant just above the caps. Each reflector is about 1" high by 6" long. They appear to basically wrap the circumference of the hydrant with these things, leaving a small gap between each reflector. I haven't got a close look at them to see how they're attached, but I can say they are VERY effective.

  4. #4
    Early Adopter cozmosis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,921

    Default

    We were able to get large sheets of reflective paper from our Public Works department. It's the same stuff they make signs out of... reflective (blue) on one side and sticky on the other. We cut it into rectangles and placed them on each plug. They are fairly effective.

    Personally, I would like to paint the caps a reflective gray/silver. I've seen paint that looks matte in the day and reflects at night... which is along the lines of what would probably look/work best.

  5. #5
    Forum Member fftrainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 1999
    Location
    Northern, NJ
    Posts
    889

    Default

    We use the fiberglass sticks. They work great in the snow, and we have actually started leaving them on all year rather than taking them on and off. We have found that with the reflective markings on them they make the hydrant easier to find in the middle of the night or in a bad rain storm, etc.

    The only thing we have to do is stand with the marker bent down between your legs (no comments kids.... ) in order to spin the wrench to open the hydrant. Other than that, they have been worth the time and money to get them and install them.

  6. #6
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,570

    Default

    We went for metal rods with reflective circles on the top. Hey, they were donated so we couldn't beat the cost. They suck. After 2 months, almost every one of them was bent in some interesting shape around the hydrant so they could not be seen anyway. I have seen the flexible fiberglass ones used and they seem to be much better. We also thought of putting striping on the hydrants themselves, problem is, when you are going down a block, you can't see the striping due to all the cars parked in the area.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  7. #7
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post

    Our hydrants are marked with metal poles, blue reflective striping...and locations are painted on the street. In addition, the fire desk transmits the 3 nearest hydrant locations by intersection...or address.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Our town reflective signs with a little picture of a hydrant..Clearly shows day or nite,rain or snow where the hydrants are

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    145

    Default

    double post sorry


    Our Town Has Reflective Signs..****

  10. #10
    Temporarily/No Longer Active Cellblock776's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    319

    Default

    We use the blue road reflectors here in our part of Louisiana. No snow here. Just lots and lots of rain.

  11. #11
    Senior Member hotboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Our hydrants are painted with a relective gray paint. All officers and and drives make a point to know where hydrants are located. We have location drills 1 once a month we have about 40 streets in our local and 2 of them have no hydrants so our preplan really is vital.
    If we don't do it nobody else will!!!!

  12. #12
    Forum Member 33motor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX.
    Posts
    422

    Default

    The blue reflectors are used here too, snow is not an issue for us. Also,don't bother looking for blue reflectors when you work in the poor section of town like I do... guess they must have started on the "nice" side of town and ran out before they got there.
    http://www.sanantoniofire.org

    IACOJ
    Got Crust?

    We lucky few, ... we band of brothers

  13. #13
    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Somewhere between genius and insanity!
    Posts
    13,554

    Default

    We have the metal rods with the reflective "paddle" at the top.

    Some of them do get vandalized by the little punks in the neighborhoods.. in that case, we don't replace the marker. We also have hydrant location on the tear sheet printout, so we have a location either way.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  14. #14
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,151

    Lightbulb

    Flags, stickers, signs, markers. They all have been use here. The blue markers, which is a standard color for the federal highways coloring system indicating water or drains are good. If you put them in like the lane markers, they will last until the road is repaved or torn up. Simply using something to stick them to the pavement will be short lived, as vehicles will loose them or the dreadied snow plow will scrape them off on the first snow pushing or plowing.

    Now, The best method, regardless of what color you paint your hydrants or plugs whichever. I've never seen a fire plug painted, since a fire plug in below ground and well, you know the story. Anyhow, all our hydrants in the city as well as the adjoining counties are all painted with high quility highway grade spec aluminum paint. The "ring portion" collar below the dome of the hydrant in also painted with high quility reflective paint. Two good coats is better than one. This can use obtain in various colors. This shows up very good when the apparatus is reaponding on the streets. The headlights, roto-rays, Mars Light or whatever you are using hits the stripes on the hydrants good. We have also used this paint to paint the edges on the running boards around the apparatus, giving a good reflective strip on a lower position.

    We have hydrants on 90% of each corner in the city. The rest are either on the alley or off the corners. Our drivers are also responsiable for knowing their hydrants in their first due district!

    Stay Safe and Well out there..

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Does anyone use the reflective bands? Which are a 2-4 inch band that wraps around the entire hydrant with the reflective color indicating the gpm rating of the hydrant. Obviously if the hydrant is covered in snow you cant see the band, but if the hydrants are shoveled out there shouldnt be a problem. These seem to work well at night time because you can see the band in every direction. This with painting caps for daytime operations seems to work well.

  16. #16
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,151

    Default

    Ummmm, I think I just said that. About painting the bands around the hydrant so it can be seen 360 degrees around the hydrant. Snow getting plowed on hydrants is a problem. If you know your hydrants, then simply digging it out shouldn't be a problem.

  17. #17
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    18

    Default

    I wasnt refering to actually painting a band, what i was refering to was an actual plastic band. Just wonderding how they withstand the elements.........Same principle just a different application

  18. #18
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,151

    Default

    Painting the "band" that is just below the dome of a hydrant, holds up very well. A once or two year reapplication helps too. We haven't had any problems with type of makings. Sure make the hydrant stand out.

  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    18

    Wink

    Thanks..............

  20. #20
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Gator Country
    Posts
    4,157

    Default

    The plastic bands, is this something your department came up with or can you buy them some place? If you can buy them, where???

    Dave

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts