1. #1
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    Default The Inverted 'V' Chevron Pattern

    A Missouri firefighter writes;

    "We spend alot of time handling vehicle crashes. How are the chevrons working out on the rear of Plano's and McKinney's apparatus? I am trying to talk our truck committee into utilizing a reflective chevron pattern, but am meeting resistance."

    My Reply:
    NFPA's latest revision to Standard #1901 has the chevron panel recommended in the Appendix. That is typically the first step in getting something moved into the full Standard with the next revision.

    The lime-green & red, retro-reflective, inverted 'V' chevron pattern is the most effective step you can take towards improving visibility of the rear of your vehicles under all operating conditions.

    I believe that vehicles and apparatus in the near future will be built with smooth rear panels instead of the common treadplate design just so this reflective material can be applied.

    In addition, consider reflective tape material added to the side running boards, the edges of a compartment shelving, and the edges of all one-piece compartment doors. That way, the outline of your apparatus will be readily reflected and identified from the sides when compartment doors are open at an incident scene.
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
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    Here are the actual specifications for rear inverted 'V' pattern chevron reflective striping design shown in the University of Extrication "Safe Parking" series...........

    Plano (TX) Fire Department Apparatus Graphics

    Striping and lettering shall be provided by:
    The Grafix Shoppe.
    Contact: Shawn Donovan, Eagan MN, 612-683-9665.

    The sides of the apparatus above compartments shall have a signboard painted red to match the body. Plano Fire Rescue shall be applied on the signboard using white 3M scotch light letters with a black outline or shadow. White “diamonds” with either a black outline or shadow, shall be on both sides of Plano Fire Rescue.

    The apparatus shall have a 6” white stripe around the vehicle. There shall be a 1” gold stripe approximately 1” above the white stripe, and a 1” gold stripe approximately 1” below the white stripe. The white stripe shall begin to “fade” to red at the front edge of the rear cab door and be completely red by the point on the body where the stripe turns to run vertically.

    www.planofire.org shall be placed on front cab doors in center of white stripe. www.planofire.org shall be in red letters either printed directly on stripe, or in red scotch light.

    The gold ISO Class 1 emblems that are placed on the rear cab doors shall be approximately 16” wide.

    All materials used in the striping, lettering and emblems shall be 3M.

    The back of the apparatus shall have a barricade pattern with 6” red stripes on a lime-yellow background. The back of the apparatus that will have the barricade pattern shall be smooth aluminum painted red to match the vehicle. The lime-yellow sheets go on the red painted surface, and the 6” red stripes go over the lime-yellow.

    Contact for 3M Lime-Yellow: Rollie Bible, 3M Traffic Control Materials Division, St. Paul MN, 651-733-3590. Specs for the barricade pattern materials are as follows.

    Lime-yellow background material: Scotchlite Diamond Grade Fluorescent LDP Reflective Sheeting – 3963.

    Red 6-inch diagonal stripes: Scotchlite Electronic Cutable Film – 1172 – Red.

    Optional treatments for the rear barricade pattern: 1160 Protective Overlay Film. (This is like putting Teflon over the reflective film; it makes it easier to clean.) 880i (ink) clear edge seal. (This keeps dirt out of the first row of cells at the edge of the sheeting.)
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
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    Sometimes I wanna hit my computer Here's the photo
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    NYS FF1/AEMT-CC
    IAEP Local 152
    "You stopped being in charge when I showed up"

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    Default Re: The Inverted 'V' Chevron Pattern

    Originally posted by rmoore
    NFPA's latest revision to Standard #1901 has the chevron panel recommended in the Appendix. That is typically the first step in getting something moved into the full Standard with the next revision.

    The lime-green & red, retro-reflective, inverted 'V' chevron pattern is the most effective step you can take towards improving visibility of the rear of your vehicles under all operating conditions.
    Ron, is the photo illustration above the design you refer to in your 2nd post? Can these stripes be applied like the ordinary roll on reflective striping? Or must it be ordered as a whole sheet?

    Thanks.
    Remember, it IS as bad as you think and they ARE out to get you!

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    The Lime-Green that you see is actually large sheets applied first to the metal of the apparatus. The red reflective stripes are the same type of 3M material applied over top of the base green color.

    The entire red and green pattern is retro-reflective.

    Here's a series of images of both the red & lime-green design and the red & white pattern. Both are effective but the red/lime-green is remarkably visible under all conditions.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
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    Here's a better look at the inverted Chevron pattern on the back of med units. You can also put it on the inside of the rear doors so if they are left open at a scene, they add to the chevron pattern rather than obstruct it.
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    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
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    Because the base material is retro-reflective, everything 'glows' when lights shine upon it at night or in conditions of limited visibility.
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    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
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    If lime-green isn't your thing, the chevron can be completed with reflective red and white. It's just not as effective but much better than the rear of a standard-issue ambulance.
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    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
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