1. #1
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    Default 2.2, 3.0, 4.5 Fifty Series?

    Can anyone explain the difference in the Scott 2.2, 3.0, & 4.5 in the Fifty series SCBA? I see all kinds of options available with these, but nowhere do I see what the difference in each style is (whats different between 2.2 & 3.0, etc)???? I'm confused........

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    While I'm no expert on packs, I can tell ya that the numbers are just the size of the bottles. What are the varying options for each size?
    ~Kevin
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    Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong
    Dennis Miller

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    I see now - 2.2 = 2216 PSI and so on. Thanks for help!

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    Correct.
    2.2 = 2216 psi
    3.0 = 3000 psi
    4.5 = 4500 psi

    My job operates 2.2's and 4.5's. 2.2 cylinders are aluminum and 4.5's are carbon spun.

    Very nice!

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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    mark440 is correct --

    2.2 = 2216 psi
    3.0 = 3000 psi
    4.5 = 4500 psi


    These are the pressures that bottles operate at. But there is another thing to take into consideration - the capacity of the cylinder.

    The capacity of the cylinder - in cubic feet of air - denotes how long the cylinder will typically last.

    Also remember this -

    If you take 20 cubic feet of air and compress it to 2216psi. It will take up a larger space than if you compress it to 4500psi.

    One advantage of the 4500psi cylinders is that they provide more air - in a smaller package.
    Marc

    "In Omnia Paratus"

    Member - IACOJ
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    -- The opinions presented here are my own; and are not those of any organization that I belong to, or work for.

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    The air pack 50 has a different backpack then say an older 4.5. The nice thing about SCOTT is many options can be switched from pack to pack. For example you can get an air pack 50 with everything that a NXG has except for the quick connect.
    That is the one thing that makes scott better is you can have a twenty year old pack and use the AV3000 mask if you wanted.

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    Talking

    Another thing to consider is that the 2.2 weighs a lot more than 4.5. I went from a dept that used only 2.2 to a dept that uses only 4.5 and what a difference it makes on your back. Hell I can hardly tell the 4.5 is on my back. And I can wear a pack twice as long now because of the difference.

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    I don't know what styles of bottles you guys are using, but my job recently switched just a single engine company to 4.5's, the new bottles are a tad larger and heavier then the 2.2's.
    While I'm more then happy to have then extra time for the weight trade off... there is a difference.

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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    Mark, it sounds like that engine got 1 hour 4.5s instead of the 1/2 hour 4.5s. You are correct if you got the 1 hour high pressure packs then the cylinders are about the same size or larger than the 1/2 hour 2.2 cylinders. But you can cut cylinder size almost in half by doubling the pressure of the air volume needed for a 1/2 hour cylinder.
    Shawn M. Cecula
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    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

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    The 30 minute 2.2 and 4.5's hold 45ft3 of air.

    The 30 minute 3.0 cylinder holds 59ft3 of air.

    The actual volume of the interior space of a 30 minute cylinder:
    2.2 - 523in3.
    3.0 - 515in3.
    4.5 - 283in3.

    A 60 minute carbon cylinder has 27in3 more interior volume than a 30 minute 2.2.
    Last edited by ScottCook; 02-27-2004 at 08:38 AM.
    www.gvfd.org

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    Originally posted by ScottCook
    The 30 minute 2.2 and 4.5's hold 45ft3 of air.

    The 30 minute 3.0 cylinder holds 59ft3 of air.

    The actual volume of the interior space of a 30 minute cylinder:
    2.2 - 523in3.
    3.0 - 515in3.
    4.5 - 283in3.

    A 60 minute carbon cylinder has 27in3 more interior volume than a 30 minute 2.2.
    And there you have it!
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

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    I went to Scott's website because I was curious about comments being made regarding the weight of the cylinders. Here is the information from their site:

    2216 Aluminum cylinder 21 pounds
    2216 Carbon cylinder 9.4 pounds
    3000 Carbon cylinder 12.8 pounds
    4500 Carbon cylinder 30 minutes 9.4 pounds
    4500 Carbon cylinder 45 minutes 13.6 pounds
    4500 Carbon cylinder 60 minutes 16.6 pounds

    Now unless my vision is flawed if you choose a 30 minute cylinder in Carbon the weight is exactly the same for 2216 and 4500. The weight difference only is a factor if you choose an aluminum cylinder or 3000 psi in low pressure or if you choose 45 or 60 minute in 4500 psi.

    If you intend to stick entirely with 30 minute cylinders there is no advantage other than a smaller profile in going to 4500 psi. If you intend to go to 45 minute or 60 minute cylinders then the 4500 psi makes sense. My decision in this area was weighted by what my neighbors use and the majority use 2216 cylinders.

    FyredUp

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    Most excellent information you've all provided. I had no clue about all this... except for the actual use I've got out of them.
    It is very interesting.

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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