Thread: Photography

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    Ok i got a quick question... im using my digital camera (Kodak cx6330) and i was wondering what the best setting for using it at a night time fire would be?

    also, I feel kinda bad using the flash (is that a problem if i use it... is it distracting?) but if it isnt, i dont know what setting would work best.

    for the flash settings (my problem) there is night time setting, but it has a few diferent flash settings (fill flash, auto, red eye)


    anything helps
    I havent failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work.

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    I'm not the best photographer, but I'm okay with a digital camera and I try to help you here. I wouldn't think you would need to worry about red eye unless you are taken pictures of people posing, as far as the flash, if you have enough lighting, don't use it. Its really just a matter of what you think will work best. The great thing about digitial cameras is that you can preview your photos and delete them, so use the preview setting or whatever its called on your camera. Go to www.wvrc24.com and go to the Recent Calls section for the pictures I've taken!
    Proud to be IACOJ!
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    Thanks!
    I havent failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work.

    - Thomas Edison

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    In the Auto setting, the camera's electronics will decide if flash is needed. The Fill Flash setting will enable the flash to reduce shadows on your subject during daylight photography. The Red Eye Reduction is a feature which reduces or eliminates the reflection of the flash in the eyes of your subject. (You've probably seen photos where the eyeballs have red dots appearing in the image.)

    If you are taking photos at a fire with sufficient light from the flames or "on scene" lighting, you may not need a flash. However, if you are taking photos of firefighters, equipment or objects that are not well lit, use of the flash is suggested. Think about what "effect" you want to establish in the photo.

    For example, if you are composing a photo with flames in the background, and firefighters in the foreground....you have two options. With no flash, the firefighters will probably be silouetted against the glow of the flames. With flash, they will be illuminated against the glow of the flames. Each photo will have distinctly different dramatic effects.

    Again....the Auto setting will make the decision for you, but may result in light where you may not want it. Take some sample photos; experiment with your camera and view the results on the display. The great thing about digital...is the ability to delete what you do not want.

    I'm still shooting film...using a Nikon F5 and a Nikon N8008. I'm just about ready to make the move to digital...and may do that this year.

    Enjoy...
    NJ
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    Can't help you with the digital, but as a film photographer I always set it in manual and adjust the flash accordingly. Like Ed I am contemplating at least a partial switch to digital.
    "I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

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    From my experience with digitals I have found that the flash is strong, but tends not to be strong enough for "long" shots. This also tends to be an issue with film as well. I have always shot my night pic's with flash on full manual, unless it was a close in shot, or there wasa ton of light. If your camera supports it, use an external flash with some balls to get enough light. You may have to play a round with it quite a bit, and you may find that sometimes its like shooting a picture of a black hole...there ain't never gonna be enough light.

    Dave

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    I took some diferent ones the other day a a fire. i got one that came out okay. YAY!!!

    thanks for your help... ill get 2 ant the next one i promise
    I havent failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work.

    - Thomas Edison

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    You will really need an external flash. The flashes built into cameras is enough to light up the reflective stripes and nothing more. Get an external flash and set it to full power. Set the camera to ASA 400, the shutter speed to 1/60 of a second and the aperature to 4.0 or 5.6.

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    i'm no camera man but always thought flash is only good for 10 feet .. think what u need is a tripod and open up the lens..

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