Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber ffbam24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,482

    Question Apparatus Rolling Code 3

    Any suggestions/recommendations on when responding which rig should be first? (Aid Car or the Engine?)

    Trying to find any articles if they are out there too.

    I like to have my engine roll first then the aid car follows. Reasoning: The engine can't stop on a dime, so if the aid car is first and stops suddenly, the engine may not stop in time and rear-end the aid car.

    Any feedback or can anyone point me toward some articles?

    bam


  2. #2
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    7,857

    Question

    Bam,
    that post is really vague...........if you have a medical/EMS call why would not the aid car go first ? Second if your engine is that far up the aid cars whazoooooo then you have muvh bigger issues.More info please.
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  3. #3
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Gator Country
    Posts
    4,157

    Default

    Our SOP has always been to have the smaller unit follow the larger. So when our engine rolls with the DC, the chief follows. The engine is larger and has more emergency lights which makes it easier to see and it makes more noise (electronic & "Q" with dual air horns), all of which are better for clearing traffic.

    As far as I know, all the other area FD's have the same SOP.

    Dave

  4. #4
    Forum Member SCOOBY14B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Biggest, loudest, brightest first. Others 500' behind. If the second is "shadowing" it can be hit when driver pulls back out into traffic. Granted...500' can give a lot of distance to allow cars to sneak back in.

    One of our double houses has engine, squad, rescue, ladder and BC. A few shifts ago we were their along with half the battalion training. We got a working apt fire and had three engines, two ladders, rescue, squad, BC and div chief rolling. Talk about a rolling train.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    So Berwick, Me
    Posts
    111

    Default Re: Apparatus Rolling Code 3

    Originally posted by ffbam24
    The engine can't stop on a dime, so if the aid car is first and stops suddenly, the engine may not stop in time and rear-end the aid car.

    Than your engine driver, is either driving too fast or following too close.... There is no excuse of ANY KIND to rear end another vehicle with a fire truck... NEVER.

    -Nick

  6. #6
    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    5,213

    Default

    Ditto on the engine first, although I'm not quite sure what you're talking about for an Aide car.

    Also have to agree that if you are worried about apparatus getting rear ended by other apparatus, then you have some major driver's training issues that need to be addressed..........

  7. #7
    Forum Member kghemtp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    726

    Default

    Scooby makes a good point, as do others. An ambulance is much more maneuverable, which would be helpful when the driving public chooses to fall back into traffic after the first piece rolls by. Fortunately, the first truck has often caught the attention of drivers, so they have a greater likelihood of expecting another one.
    ~Kevin
    Firefighter/Paramedic
    --^v--^v--^v--^v--
    Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong
    Dennis Miller

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    566

    Default

    I've responded a few times to the airport for a plane emergency, had an aerial and a pumper behind the Chevy Tahoe used by the chief. Never had an issue with apparatus responding too close together and never had an issue with people pulling in between the apparatus. If people can't here and see the apparatus responding, either you need to get your emergency sound systems checked, or they need some hearing aides and glasses.

  9. #9
    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    5,213

    Default

    Originally posted by 42VTExplorer
    If people can't here and see the apparatus responding, either you need to get your emergency sound systems checked, or they need some hearing aides and glasses.
    Either you haven't responded in apparatus a whole lot or the peopl in your area are totally different than those in the rrest of the US, because that is a common problem all over. You can have all the lights and sirens in the world, and you will still have people that don't pay attention and know you are there........

  10. #10
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Gator Country
    Posts
    4,157

    Talking

    Try living in FLA, where the majority of drivers have hearing aids, glasses AND have trouble seeing over the steering wheel.

    Dave

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    481

    Default

    You mean like the driver who pulled in front of me code 3 in our tender, then suddenly slowed to pull into a driveway? He must think that 2,000 gal of H2O is light weight! I tried every tone on the siren, plus the air horn, I even tried the PA system!

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber ffbam24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,482

    Default

    All very good points.
    Unfortunately there are a few cowboys and freelancers here who rush to beat anybody and everybody out of the barn. (Yes! A very big issue.)

    Now we haven't had an actual "issue", but I have raised my concern and was looking to see if there is any documentation to support those concerns to make these individuals possibly slowdown and take a look.

    I'll have to see if our elusive SOP's address this. If not, they should.

    To clarify, our aid car and engine will both respond code 3 to say CPR or an MVA. Most other calls one will respond code red and the other will shadow it code yellow.

  13. #13
    Forum Member firespec35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Milford MI USA
    Posts
    213

    Default

    Ok either I haven't had enough caffine yet or I'm missing something. What is an aid car. Is your dept using a caprice or crown vic as a firstline medical response unit or is it just another name for your squad, rescue, medic etc...
    Never Forget 9-11-01!!!!!!
    There wasn't just 343, the other 73 rescue workers deserve to be remembered too!!!!

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    481

    Default

    Also, what the heck is 'code yellow'?
    Code 3 - red lights and siren
    Code 2 - red lights only (rarely used any more)
    Code 1 - No lights or siren, as fast as traffic/road conditions allow at (not above) the speed limit.

    27 years in Law Enforcement (Both Coasts & the Southern Border), 3 years FF, never heard of 'code yellow'.

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber ffbam24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,482

    Cool Wow! Okay, gather round for some quick training.

    An Aid Car is very much a ambulance or medic chasis, used to respond and at times transport a BLS (Basic Life Support) patient. And in rare occasion a ALS (Advanced Life Support) patient with a Paramedic riding providing patient care with the assistance of a BLS-trained FF/EMT.

    This whole Code Red/Yellow thing you about have figured out.

    Code 3 : Lights and Sirens : Code Red
    Code 1 : NO lights or sirens. Traveling with traffic flow. : Code Yellow

    These are probably Pacific NW specific terms. More agency specific due to the confusion on these.


  16. #16
    Forum Member firespec35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Milford MI USA
    Posts
    213

    Default

    Ok I'm not nutz. We had a dept out here that was split from PSO down to the PD disbanded and fire being part time with shifts and they ran a firsline medical (MFR) unit from a repainted cop car for a while till they bought a squad type vehicle.
    Never Forget 9-11-01!!!!!!
    There wasn't just 343, the other 73 rescue workers deserve to be remembered too!!!!

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I actually have a dispute going on in my Co.

    My "Senior" team per say like to say they are responding:

    Class 1 - Lights/Sirens and the Whoopie Cushion

    Class 3 - If Normal

    -----------------------------------------

    I have said time and time again it's the reverse (and no I purposley left is class instead of code because in PA they use code 3 as something else i.e. DOA on board.)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts